13 found
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  1.  85
    Psychological Investigations: The Private Language Argument and Inferences in Contemporary Cognitive Science.C. D. Meyers & Sara Waller - 2009 - Synthese 171 (1):135-156.
    Some of the methods for data collection in experimental psychology, as well as many of the inferences from observed behavior or image scanning, are based on the implicit premise that language use can be linked, via the meaning of words, to specific subjective states. Wittgenstein’s well known private language argument (PLA), however, calls into question the legitimacy of such inferences. According to a strong interpretation of PLA, all of the elements of a language must be publicly available. Thus the meaning (...)
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  2. Moral Duty, Individual Responsibility, and Sweatshop Exploitation.C. D. Meyers - 2007 - Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (4):620–626.
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  3.  25
    Why It is Morally Good to Eat (Certain Kinds of) Meat.C. D. Meyers - 2013 - Southwest Philosophy Review 29 (1):119-126.
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  4.  27
    Nature, Virtue, and the Nature of Virtue.C. D. Meyers - 2010 - Southwest Philosophy Review 26 (1):109-117.
    Most of the philosophical work written on environmental issues focuses on notions such as rights, consequences, duties, etc. And most of the theoretical philosophy done in environmental ethics focuses on questions of whether animals, plants, or ecosystems have inherent value or moral standing independently of their usefulness to humans. A character-based approach has been largely neglected (despite a few important works). In this paper, I consider what a plausible environmental virtue ethics would look like. Specifically, I argue (pace Sandler) that (...)
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  5.  45
    Defending Moral Realism From Empirical Evidence of Disagreement.C. D. Meyers - 2013 - Social Theory and Practice 39 (3):373-396.
    Recently, empirically minded philosophers have employed evidence of widespread, fundamental moral disagreement to argue against moral realism. I argue that the empirical evidence does not refute realism because the disagreement is consistent with certain pluralistic versions of moral realism that posit a set of pro tanto normative principles. Others have appealed to pluralism in defense of moral realism but have used pluralism to attack the empirically based approach to ethical theory. Although I argue that the empirical argument against moral realism (...)
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  6.  23
    Why (Most) Rational People Must Disapprove of the Invasion of Iraq.C. D. Meyers - 2006 - Social Theory and Practice 32 (2):249-268.
  7.  92
    The Virtue of Cold-Heartedness.C. D. Meyers - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 138 (2):233 - 244.
    I defend a strong version of the Kantian claim that actions done solely from duty have moral worth by (1) considering pure cases of acting from duty, (2) showing that love and sympathy, unlike a sense of duty, can often lead us to do the wrong thing, (3) carefully distinguishing moral from non-moral virtues, and (4) by distinguishing pathological sympathy from practical sympathy. Not only is acting purely from a sense of duty superior to acting from love and sympathetic feelings, (...)
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  8.  24
    Automatic Behavior and Moral Agency: Defending the Concept of Personhood From Empirically Based Skepticism.C. D. Meyers - 2015 - Acta Analytica 30 (2):193-209.
    Empirical evidence indicates that much of human behavior is unconscious and automatic. This has led some philosophers to be skeptical of responsible agency or personhood in the moral sense. I present two arguments defending agency from these skeptical concerns. My first argument, the “margin of error” argument, is that the empirical evidence is consistent with the possibility that our automatic behavior deviates only slightly from what we would do if we were in full conscious control. Responsible agency requires only that (...)
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  9.  31
    Brains, Trolleys, and Intuitions: Defending Deontology From the Greene/Singer Argument.C. D. Meyers - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (4):466-486.
    Joshua Greene and Peter Singer argue, on the basis of empirical evidence, that deontological moral judgments result from emotional reactions while dispassionate reasoning leads to consequentialist judgments. Given that there are good reasons to doubt these emotionally driven intuitions, they argue that we should reject Kantian ethics. I argue that the evidence does not support the claim that consequentialism is inherently more reason-based or less emotion-based than Kantian ethics. This is partly because the experiments employ a functional definition of ‘deontological’ (...)
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  10.  24
    Neuroenhancement in Reflective Equilibrium: A Qualified Kantian Defense of Enhancing in Scholarship and Science.C. D. Meyers - 2014 - Neuroethics 7 (3):287-298.
    Cognitive neuroenhancement involves the use of medical interventions to improve normal cognitive functioning such as memory, focus, concentration, or willpower. In this paper I give a Kantian argument defending the use of CNE in science, scholarly research, and creative fields. Kant’s universal law formulation of the categorical imperative shows why enhancement is morally wrong in the familiar contexts of sports or competitive games. This argument, however, does not apply to the use of CNE in higher education, scholarly or scientific research, (...)
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  11.  24
    Hobbes and the Rationality of Self-Preservation: Grounding Morality on the Desires We Should Have.C. D. Meyers - 2013 - The European Legacy 18 (3):269-286.
    In deriving his moral code, Hobbes does not appeal to any mind-independent good, natural human telos, or innate human sympathies. Instead he assumes a subjectivist theory of value and an egoistic theory of human motivation. Some critics, however, doubt that his laws of nature can be constructed from such scant material. Hobbes ultimately justifies the acceptance of moral laws by the fact that they promote self-preservation. But, as Hobbes himself acknowledges, not everyone prefers survival over natural liberty. In this essay (...)
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  12.  20
    Transferability of Duty and the Agent-Relative / Agent-Neutral Distinction.C. D. Meyers - 2007 - Southwest Philosophy Review 23 (1):199-206.
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  13. Why Rational People Must Disapprove of the Invasion of Iraq.C. D. Meyers - 2006 - Social Theory and Practice 32 (2):249-268.
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