Results for 'C. Emily Durbin'

991 found
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  1.  22
    Temperamental fearfulness in childhood and the serotonin transporter promoter region polymorphism: a multimethod association study.E. P. Hayden, L. R. Dougherty, B. Maloney, C. Emily Durbin, T. M. Olino, J. I. Nurnberger Jr, D. K. Lahiri & D. N. Klein - 2007 - Psychiatr Genet 17:135-42.
    OBJECTIVES: Early-emerging, temperamental differences in fear-related traits may be a heritable vulnerability factor for anxiety disorders. Previous research indicates that the serotonin transporter promoter region polymorphism is a candidate gene for such traits. METHODS: Associations between 5-HTTLPR genotype and indices of fearful child temperament, derived from maternal report and standardized laboratory observations, were examined in a community sample of 95 preschool-aged children. RESULTS: Children with one or more long alleles of the 5-HTTLPR gene were rated as significantly more nervous during (...)
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  2.  36
    Cognitive and temperamental vulnerability to depression: Longitudinal associations with regional cortical activity.Elizabeth P. Hayden, Stewart A. Shankman, Thomas M. Olino, C. Emily Durbin, Craig E. Tenke, Gerard E. Bruder & Daniel N. Klein - 2008 - Cognition and Emotion 22 (7):1415-1428.
  3. Experiments, Simulations, and Epistemic Privilege.Emily C. Parke - 2014 - Philosophy of Science 81 (4):516-536.
    Experiments are commonly thought to have epistemic privilege over simulations. Two ideas underpin this belief: first, experiments generate greater inferential power than simulations, and second, simulations cannot surprise us the way experiments can. In this article I argue that neither of these claims is true of experiments versus simulations in general. We should give up the common practice of resting in-principle judgments about the epistemic value of cases of scientific inquiry on whether we classify those cases as experiments or simulations, (...)
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  4. "That's Above My Paygrade": Woke Excuses for Ignorance.Emily C. R. Tilton - forthcoming - Philosophers' Imprint.
    Standpoint theorists have long been clear that marginalization does not make better understanding a given. They have been less clear, though, that social dominance does not make ignorance a given. Indeed, many standpoint theorists have implicitly committed themselves to what I call the strong epistemic disadvantage thesis. According to this thesis, there are strong, substantive limits on what the socially dominant can know about oppression that they do not personally experience. I argue that this thesis is not just implausible but (...)
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  5. Rape Myths, Catastrophe, and Credibility.Emily C. R. Tilton - 2022 - Episteme:1-17.
    There is an undeniable tendency to dismiss women’s sexual assault allegations out of hand. However, this tendency is not monolithic—allegations that black men have raped white women are often met with deadly seriousness. I argue that contemporary rape culture is characterized by the interplay between rape myths that minimize rape, and myths that catastrophize rape. Together, these two sets of rape myths distort the epistemic resources that people use when assessing rape allegations. These distortions result in the unjust exoneration of (...)
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  6. Not What I Agreed To: Content and Consent.Emily C. R. Tilton & Jonathan Ichikawa - 2021 - Ethics 132 (1):127–154.
    Deception sometimes results in nonconsensual sex. A recent body of literature diagnoses such violations as invalidating consent: the agreement is not morally transformative, which is why the sexual contact is a rights violation. We pursue a different explanation for the wrongs in question: there is valid consent, but it is not consent to the sex act that happened. Semantic conventions play a key role in distinguishing deceptions that result in nonconsensual sex (like stealth condom removal) from those that don’t (like (...)
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  7. Evidentialism and belief polarization.Emily C. McWilliams - 2021 - Synthese 198 (8):7165-7196.
    Belief polarization occurs when subjects who disagree about some matter of fact are exposed to a mixed body of evidence that bears on that dispute. While we might expect mutual exposure to common evidence to mitigate disagreement, since the evidence available to subjects comes to consist increasingly of items they have in common, this is not what happens. The subjects’ initial disagreement becomes more pronounced because each person increases confidence in her antecedent belief. Kelly aims to identify the mechanisms that (...)
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  8.  30
    Developmental change in numerical estimation.Emily B. Slusser, Rachel T. Santiago & Hilary C. Barth - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (1):193.
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  9.  93
    Evidentialism and Epistemic Duties to Inquire.Emily C. McWilliams - 2023 - Philosophical Quarterly 73 (4):965-982.
    Are there epistemic duties to inquire? The idea enjoys intuitive support. However, prominent evidentialists argue that our only epistemic duty is to believe well (i.e., to have doxastically justified beliefs), and doing so does not require inquiry. Against this, I argue that evidentialists are plausibly committed to the idea that if we have epistemic duties to believe well, then we have epistemic duties to inquire. This is because on plausible evidentialist views of evidence possession (i.e., views that result in plausible (...)
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  10.  40
    Seeking consent for research with indigenous communities: a systematic review.Emily F. M. Fitzpatrick, Alexandra L. C. Martiniuk, Heather D’Antoine, June Oscar, Maureen Carter & Elizabeth J. Elliott - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):65.
    BackgroundWhen conducting research with Indigenous populations consent should be sought from both individual participants and the local community. We aimed to search and summarise the literature about methods for seeking consent for research with Indigenous populations.MethodsA systematic literature search was conducted for articles that describe or evaluate the process of seeking informed consent for research with Indigenous participants. Guidelines for ethical research and for seeking consent with Indigenous people are also included in our review.ResultsOf 1447 articles found 1391 were excluded (...)
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  11. Emily Cheng with Robert C. Morgan.Emily Cheng, Robert C. Morgan, Gerry Snyder, Michael St John & Ted Flaxman - 1996 - Mass Productions.
     
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  12.  27
    The seductive allure is a reductive allure: People prefer scientific explanations that contain logically irrelevant reductive information.Emily J. Hopkins, Deena Skolnick Weisberg & Jordan C. V. Taylor - 2016 - Cognition 155 (C):67-76.
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  13.  37
    Rousseau, Social Alienation, and the Possibility of Generative Critique: A Review Essay.Emily C. Nacol - 2009 - CLR James Journal 15 (1):228-234.
  14.  14
    The Infidel and the Professor: David Hume, Adam Smith, and the Friendship that Shaped Modern Thought.Emily C. Nacol - 2019 - Contemporary Political Theory 18 (4):270-273.
  15.  79
    The picture talk project: Aboriginal community input on consent for research.Emily F. M. Fitzpatrick, Gaynor Macdonald, Alexandra L. C. Martiniuk, June Oscar, Heather D’Antoine, Maureen Carter, Tom Lawford & Elizabeth J. Elliott - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):12.
    The consent and community engagement process for research with Indigenous communities is rarely evaluated. Research protocols are not always collaborative, inclusive or culturally respectful. If participants do not trust or understand the research, selection bias may occur in recruitment, affecting study results potentially denying participants the opportunity to provide more knowledge and greater understanding about their community. Poorly informed consent can also harm the individual participant and the community as a whole. Invited by local Aboriginal community leaders of the Fitzroy (...)
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  16.  3
    Voter emotional responses and voting behaviour in the 2020 US presidential election.Heather C. Lench, Leslie Fernandez, Noah Reed, Emily Raibley, Linda J. Levine & Kiki Salsedo - forthcoming - Cognition and Emotion.
    Political polarisation in the United States offers opportunities to explore how beliefs about candidates – that they could save or destroy American society – impact people’s thoughts, feelings, and behaviour. Participants forecast their future emotional responses to the contentious 2020 U.S. presidential election, and reported their actual responses after the election outcome. Stronger beliefs about candidates were associated with forecasts of greater emotion in response to the election, but the strength of this relationship differed based on candidate preference. Trump supporters’ (...)
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  17.  15
    Testimonial Withdrawal and The Ontology of Testimonial Injustice.Emily C. McWilliams - 2024 - Southwest Philosophy Review 40 (1):115-126.
    Concepts like testimonial injustice (Fricker, 2007) and testimonial violence (Dotson, 2011) articulate that marginalized epistemic agents are unjustly undermined as testifiers when dominant agents cannot or will not hear, understand, or believe their testimony. This paper turns attention away from these constraints on uptake, and towards pragmatic, social, and political constraints on how dominant audiences receive and react to testimony. I argue that these constraints can also be sources of testimonial injustice and epistemic violence. Specifically, I explore a kind of (...)
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  18.  19
    Going big by going small: Trade-offs in microbiome explanations of cancer.Emily C. Parke & Anya Plutynski - 2023 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 97 (C):101-110.
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  19.  11
    Christopher Marlowe in Context.Emily C. Bartels & Emma Smith (eds.) - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    A contemporary of William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson, Christopher Marlowe was one of the most influential early modern dramatists, whose life and mysterious death have long been the subject of critical and popular speculation. This collection sets Marlowe's plays and poems in their historical context, exploring his world and his wider cultural influence. Chapters by leading international scholars discuss both his major and lesser-known works. Divided into three sections, 'Marlowe's works', 'Marlowe's world', and 'Marlowe's reception', the book ranges from Marlowe's (...)
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  20.  18
    Expanding insurance coverage for in vitro fertilisation with preimplantation genetic testing: putting the cart before the horse.Emily C. Lisi - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (3):202-204.
    Madison Kilbride recently argued that insurance ) should cover in vitro fertilisation with preimplantation genetic testing services for couples at high risk of having a child affected with a genetic condition. She argues that IVF-PGT meets CMS’s definition of ‘medically necessary care’, where such care includes ‘services or supplies needed to diagnose or treat an illness, injury, condition, disease or its symptoms’. Kilbride argues that IVF-PGT satisfies this definition in two ways: as a diagnostic tool and as a treatment. Contradicting (...)
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  21.  29
    Ethics review of studies during public health emergencies - the experience of the WHO ethics review committee during the Ebola virus disease epidemic.Emilie Alirol, Annette C. Kuesel, Maria Magdalena Guraiib, Vânia Dela Fuente-Núñez, Abha Saxena & Melba F. Gomes - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):43.
    Between 2013 and 2016, West Africa experienced the largest ever outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease. In the absence of registered treatments or vaccines to control this lethal disease, the World Health Organization coordinated and supported research to expedite identification of interventions that could control the outbreak and improve future control efforts. Consequently, the World Health Organization Research Ethics Review Committee was heavily involved in reviews and ethics discussions. It reviewed 24 new and 22 amended protocols for research studies including interventional (...)
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  22.  9
    Abortion: The New Ruling.Emily C. Moore, Harold Edgar, Karen A. Lebacqz & Daniel Callahan - 1973 - Hastings Center Report 3 (2):4.
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  23.  15
    Flies from meat and wasps from trees: Reevaluating Francesco Redi’s spontaneous generation experiments.Emily C. Parke - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 45:34-42.
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  24.  47
    What could arsenic bacteria teach us about life?Emily C. Parke - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (2):205-218.
    In this paper, I discuss the recent discovery of alleged arsenic bacteria in Mono Lake, California, and the ensuing debate in the scientific community about the validity and significance of these results. By situating this case in the broader context of projects that search for anomalous life forms, I examine the methodology and upshots of challenging biochemical constraints on living things. I distinguish between a narrower and a broader sense in which we might challenge or change our knowledge of life (...)
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  25.  23
    Fiscal equivalence: Principle and predation in the public administration of justice.Emily C. Skarbek - 2021 - Social Philosophy and Policy 38 (1):244-265.
    Fiscal equivalence in the public administration of justice requires local police and courts to be financed exclusively by the populations that benefit from their services. Within a polycentric framework, broad based taxation to achieve fiscal equivalence is a desirable principle of public finance because it conceptually allows for the provision of justice to be determined by constituent’s preferences, and increases the political accountability of service providers to constituents. However, the overproduction of justice services can readily occur when the benefits of (...)
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  26.  24
    The Neuroanatomical Basis of Two Subcomponents of Rumination: A VBM Study.Emily L. L. Sin, R. Shao, Xiujuan Geng, Valda Cho & Tatia M. C. Lee - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  27.  53
    Flies from meat and wasps from trees: Reevaluating Francesco Redi’s spontaneous generation experiments.Emily C. Parke - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 45 (1):34-42.
    Francesco Redi’s seventeenth-century experiments on insect generation are regarded as a key contribution to the downfall of belief in spontaneous generation. Scholars praise Redi for his experiments demonstrating that meat does not generate insects, but condemn him for his claim elsewhere that trees can generate wasps and gallflies. He has been charged with rejecting spontaneous generation only to change his mind and accept it, and in the process, with failing as a rigorous experimental philosopher. In this paper I defend Redi (...)
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  28.  36
    Ameliorative Inquiry in Epistemology.Emily C. McWilliams - 2022 - In David Bordonaba Plou, Víctor Fernández Castro & José Ramón Torices (eds.), The Political Turn in Analytic Philosophy: Reflections on Social Injustice and Oppression. Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 151-172.
    Recently, some work in feminist epistemology has received more uptake from mainstream western analytic epistemology than it had in the past. There has been recognition of the importance of topics like epistemic injustice, standpoint epistemology, and epistemologies of ignorance, for instance. But these discussions are often seen as orthogonal to core epistemic theorizing - they have not received uptake as fundamental contestations of the ways we understand epistemic value, or core normative epistemic concepts. I suggest that one reasons for this (...)
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  29.  7
    Caregiver Report of Executive Functioning in Adolescent Females With Anorexia Nervosa or Autism Spectrum Disorder.C. Alix Timko, John D. Herrington, Anushua Bhattacharya, Emily S. Kuschner & Benjamin E. Yerys - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Current literature suggesting a shared endophenotype between individuals with anorexia nervosa and autism spectrum disorder related to executive functioning has several limitations: performance-based instead of ecologically valid measures of set-shifting are used, lack of comparisons between same-sex groups, and reliance on adult samples only. This was the first study directly comparing female youth with ASD to female youth with AN using an ecologically valid measure of EF. A secondary data analysis combined caregiver-reported EF on the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive (...)
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  30.  13
    On what we may infer from artistic and scientific representations of time.C. Bourne & Emily Caddick Bourne - unknown
    We consider the extent to which artistic and scientific representations can give us knowledge of how things are or could be. Focusing on representations of time, we take two case studies: simultaneity and temporal order; time-travel to the past. We analyse relevant scientific representations – from Special Theory of Relativity and General Theory of Relativity – alongside relevant artistic representations – fictions which are non-committal about temporal order, and time-travel stories. In all the cases, we argue, drawing reliable conclusions from (...)
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  31.  17
    Announcing the Winner of the Holmes Rolston, III Early Career Essay Prize.Emily Brady & Eugene C. Hargrove - 2011 - Environmental Ethics 33 (3):228-228.
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  32. Just Ecological Integrity: The Ethics of Maintaining Planetary Life.Steven C. Rockefeller, Ana Isla, Terisa E. Turner, Paul T. Durbin, Eunice Blavascumas, Sonia Ftacnikova, Luis Alberto Camargo, Vicky Castillo, Garrick E. Louiis, Luna M. Magpili, Janos I. Toth, William E. Rees, Don Brown, Patricia H. Werhane, Mary A. Hamilton & Imre Lazar - 2002 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Just Ecological Integrity presents a collection of revised and expanded essays originating from the international conference "Connecting Environmental Ethics, Ecological Integrity, and Health in the New Millennium" held in San Jose, Costa Rica in June 2000. It is a cooperative venture of the Global Ecological Integrity Project and the Earth Charter Initiative.
     
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  33.  64
    Self-Control, Injunctive Norms, and Descriptive Norms Predict Engagement in Plagiarism in a Theory of Planned Behavior Model.Guy J. Curtis, Emily Cowcher, Brady R. Greene, Kiata Rundle, Megan Paull & Melissa C. Davis - 2018 - Journal of Academic Ethics 16 (3):225-239.
    The Theory of Planned Behavior predicts that a combination of attitudes, perceived norms, and perceived behavioral control predict intentions, and that intentions ultimately predict behavior. Previous studies have found that the TPB can predict students’ engagement in plagiarism. Furthermore, the General Theory of Crime suggests that self-control is particularly important in predicting engagement in unethical behavior such as plagiarism. In Study 1, we incorporated self-control in a TPB model and tested whether norms, attitudes, and self-control predicted intention to plagiarize and (...)
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  34.  19
    Erratum to: Ethics review of studies during public health emergencies - the experience of the WHO ethics review committee during the Ebola virus disease epidemic.Emilie Alirol, Annette C. Kuesel, Maria Magdalena Guraiib, Vânia de la Fuente-Núñez, Abha Saxena & Melba F. Gomes - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):45.
    Background Between 2013 and 2016, West Africa experienced the largest ever outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease. In the absence of registered treatments or vaccines to control this lethal disease, the World Health Organization coordinated and supported research to expedite identification of interventions that could control the outbreak and improve future control efforts. Consequently, the World Health Organization Research Ethics Review Committee was heavily involved in reviews and ethics discussions. It reviewed 24 new and 22 amended protocols for research studies including (...)
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  35.  11
    Relational Memory at Short and Long Delays in Individuals With Moderate-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.Emily L. Morrow, Michael R. Dulas, Neal J. Cohen & Melissa C. Duff - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
  36.  27
    Perinatal iron deficiency and neurocognitive development.Emily C. Radlowski & Rodney W. Johnson - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  37. How causal are microbiomes? A comparison with the H elicobacter pylori explanation of ulcers.Kate E. Lynch, Emily C. Parke & Maureen A. O’Malley - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (6):62.
    Human microbiome research makes causal connections between entire microbial communities and a wide array of traits that range from physiological diseases to psychological states. To evaluate these causal claims, we first examine a well-known single-microbe causal explanation: of Helicobacter pylori causing ulcers. This apparently straightforward causal explanation is not so simple, however. It does not achieve a key explanatory standard in microbiology, of Koch’s postulates, which rely on manipulations of single-microorganism cultures to infer causal relationships to disease. When Koch’s postulates (...)
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  38.  16
    Task decomposition: a framework for comparing diverse training models in human brain plasticity studies.Emily B. J. Coffey & Sibylle C. Herholz - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  39.  8
    Are Older Adults Less Embodied? A Review of Age Effects through the Lens of Embodied Cognition.Matthew C. Costello & Emily K. Bloesch - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  40.  11
    Improving dissemination of study results: perspectives of individuals with cystic fibrosis.Emily Christofides, Karla Stroud, Diana Elizabeth Tullis & Kieran C. O’Doherty - 2019 - Research Ethics 15 (3-4):1-14.
    The practice of communicating research findings to participants has been identified as important in the research ethics literature, but little research has examined empirically how this occurs and...
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  41.  52
    How causal are microbiomes? A comparison with the Helicobacter pylori explanation of ulcers.Kate E. Lynch, Emily C. Parke & Maureen A. O’Malley - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (6):62.
    Human microbiome research makes causal connections between entire microbial communities and a wide array of traits that range from physiological diseases to psychological states. To evaluate these causal claims, we first examine a well-known single-microbe causal explanation: of Helicobacter pylori causing ulcers. This apparently straightforward causal explanation is not so simple, however. It does not achieve a key explanatory standard in microbiology, of Koch’s postulates, which rely on manipulations of single-microorganism cultures to infer causal relationships to disease. When Koch’s postulates (...)
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  42.  36
    Striving for clarity about the “Lamarckian” nature of CRISPR-Cas systems.Sam Woolley, Emily C. Parke, David Kelley, Anthony M. Poole & Austen R. D. Ganley - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (1):11.
    Koonin argues that CRISPR-Cas systems present the best-known case in point for Lamarckian evolution because they satisfy his proposed criteria for the specific inheritance of acquired adaptive characteristics. We see two interrelated issues with Koonin’s characterization of CRISPR-Cas systems as Lamarckian. First, at times he appears to confuse an account of the CRISPR-Cas system with an account of the mechanism it employs. We argue there is no evidence for the CRISPR-Cas system being “Lamarckian” in any sense. Second, it is unclear (...)
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  43.  47
    How causal are microbiomes? A comparison with the Helicobacter pylori explanation of ulcers.Kate E. Lynch, Emily C. Parke & Maureen A. O’Malley - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (6):62.
    Human microbiome research makes causal connections between entire microbial communities and a wide array of traits that range from physiological diseases to psychological states. To evaluate these causal claims, we first examine a well-known single-microbe causal explanation: of Helicobacter pylori causing ulcers. This apparently straightforward causal explanation is not so simple, however. It does not achieve a key explanatory standard in microbiology, of Koch’s postulates, which rely on manipulations of single-microorganism cultures to infer causal relationships to disease. When Koch’s postulates (...)
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  44.  12
    Laura Ephraim. Who Speaks for Nature? On the Politics of Science. 189 pp., notes, bibl., index. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2018. $45 . ISBN 9780812249811. [REVIEW]Emily C. Nacol - 2019 - Isis 110 (1):143-144.
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  45.  21
    The Infidel and the Professor: David Hume, Adam Smith, and the Friendship that Shaped Modern Thought. [REVIEW]Emily C. Nacol - 2019 - Contemporary Political Theory 18 (4):270-273.
    In The Infidel and the Professor: David Hume, Adam Smith, and the Friendship That Shaped Modern Thought, Dennis Rasmussen reminds us that ‘Hume believed that “the first Quality of an Historian is to be true & impartial; the next to be interesting”’ (p. 72). Rasmussen meets both criteria in his history of the friendship of Hume and Smith, two luminaries of the Scottish Enlightenment. The Infidel and the Professor lays out the facts carefully, showing both the depth of Hume and (...)
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  46.  29
    Toward a Standardized Test of Fearful Temperament in Primates: A Sensitive Alternative to the Human Intruder Task for Laboratory-Housed Rhesus Macaques.Emily J. Bethell, Lauren C. Cassidy, Ralf R. Brockhausen & Dana Pfefferle - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  47.  31
    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Health Behavior Change: A Contextually-Driven Approach.Chun-Qing Zhang, Emily Leeming, Patrick Smith, Pak-Kwong Chung, Martin S. Hagger & Steven C. Hayes - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
  48. Derrida and Feminism: Recasting the Question of Woman.Ellen Feder, Mary C. Rawlinson & Emily Zakin (eds.) - 1997 - New York: Routledge.
    The first-ever compilation of articles that highlights the intersection of Derridean and feminist theories--a work that represents the extensive and diverse response feminist theorists have had to Derrida, particularly to the issues of gender, identity, and the construction of the subject.
  49.  14
    Modeling Character: Servant Leaders, Incivility and Patient Outcomes.Mitchell J. Neubert, Emily M. Hunter & Remy C. Tolentino - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (1):261-278.
    Persistent and pervasive rudeness and lack of respect are unfortunately common in workplaces today. The deleterious effects of this incivility at work may be even worse than previously demonstrated, impacting not only employee victims but also trickling down to those who employees contact. However, we propose that leaders who prioritize their followers’ needs above their own, also known as servant leaders, may be a critical preventative mechanism to reduce group-level incivility through promoting a virtuous climate. Applying social learning theory and (...)
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  50.  99
    The perverse effects of competition on scientists' work and relationships.Melissa S. Anderson, Emily A. Ronning, Raymond De Vries & Brian C. Martinson - 2007 - Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (4):437-461.
    Competition among scientists for funding, positions and prestige, among other things, is often seen as a salutary driving force in U.S. science. Its effects on scientists, their work and their relationships are seldom considered. Focus-group discussions with 51 mid- and early-career scientists, on which this study is based, reveal a dark side of competition in science. According to these scientists, competition contributes to strategic game-playing in science, a decline in free and open sharing of information and methods, sabotage of others’ (...)
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