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C. Gannon [3]Charles E. Gannon [1]Craig Gannon [1]
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Ciara Daly-Gannon
Nottingham University
  1.  8
    Palliative Opioid Use, Palliative Sedation and Euthanasia: Reaffirming the Distinction.Guy Schofield, Idris Baker, Rachel Bullock, Hannah Clare, Paul Clark, Derek Willis, Craig Gannon & Rob George - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2018-105256.
    We read with interest the extended essay published from Riisfeldt and are encouraged by an empirical ethics article which attempts to ground theory and its claims in the real world. However, such attempts also have real-world consequences. We are concerned to read the paper’s conclusion that clinical evidence weakens the distinction between euthanasia and normal palliative care prescribing. This is important. Globally, the most significant barrier to adequate symptom control in people with life-limiting illness is poor access to opioid analgesia. (...)
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  2.  56
    Elements of an Engaged Clinical Ethics: A Qualitative Analysis of Hospice Clinical Ethics Committee Discussions.G. Hunt, C. Gannon & A. Gallagher - 2012 - Clinical Ethics 7 (4):175-182.
    Social, legal and health-care changes have created an increasing need for ethical review within end-of-life care. Multiprofessional clinical ethics committees (CECs) are increasingly supporting decision-making in hospitals and hospices. This paper reports findings from an analysis of formal summaries from CEC meetings, of one UK hospice, spanning four years. Using qualitative content analysis, five themes were identified: timeliness of decision-making, holistic care, contextual openness, values diversity and consensual understanding. The elements of an engaged clinical ethics in a hospice context is (...)
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  3.  20
    A Request for Hospice Admission From Hospital to Withdraw Ventilation.C. Gannon - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (7):383-384.
    A request to admit a hospital inpatient with motor neurone disease to the hospice generated unusual unease. Significantly, withdrawal of ventilation had already been planned. The presumption that ventilation would be withdrawn after transfer presented a dilemma. Should the hospice accept the admission? If so, should the hospice staff stop the ventilation, and then when and how? Debate centred on the continuity of best interests and the logistics of withdrawing ventilation. The factors making the request contentious identified competing interests within (...)
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  4.  1
    Contrasting Schwartz Rounds with Clinical Ethics: Three Perspectives on Their Potential to Impact on End-of-Life Care.C. Gannon - 2014 - Nursing Ethics 21 (5):621-623.
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