Results for 'C. I. Chukwu'

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  1.  78
    Book Review:Symbolic Logic C. I. Lewis, C. H. Langford. [REVIEW]W. C. C. - 1952 - Philosophy of Science 19 (2):180-.
  2.  57
    Notes on the Text of Aeschylus. By E. S. Hoernle, I.C.S., Former Scholar of New College, Oxford. Crown 8vo. Pp. 100. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1921. 4s. 6d. [REVIEW]C. C. - 1922 - The Classical Review 36 (7-8):189-189.
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  3.  56
    Ancient Corinth, with a Topographical Sketch of the Corinthia. Part I: From the Earliest Times to 404 B. C.M. C. & J. G. O'Neill - 1930 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 50:371.
  4. Rule Forever: Featuring Niccolo Machiavelli's the Prince and the First Decade of Tito Livy.C. I. Chukwu - 1993 - Chiecs Publishers.
     
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  5.  22
    Why I Am Not a Christian, and Other Essays on Religion and Related Subjects. [REVIEW]L. C. - 1958 - Review of Metaphysics 11 (4):696-696.
    Arguing that religion is both false and harmful, Russell asserts the prerogative of the scientific intelligence over dogma, faith and custom. The editor has written and appended an account of how Russell was excluded from teaching at the City College of New York.--C. L.
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  6.  7
    Lewis Carroll’s Symbolic Logic: Part I and Part Ii. [REVIEW]F. K. C. - 1978 - Review of Metaphysics 31 (3):472-473.
    Professor Bartley makes a valuable contribution to the learning of logic, to the study of the history of logic, and to the study of British literature by presenting, in effect, a fifth edition of Lewis Carroll’s Symbolic Logic Part I, together with a critical reconstruction from galley proofs of the hitherto unpublished Part II. In his introduction, William W. Bartley tells of his detective work from 1959-1977 in uncovering and piecing together most of what Lewis Carroll intended to publish as (...)
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  7.  5
    Greek Into Arabic: Essays on Islamic Philosophy, Oriental Studies I. [REVIEW]E. B. C. - 1963 - Review of Metaphysics 16 (3):588-588.
    "The more we learn about the history of mankind, the more we realize that there is no spontaneous generation in history but only a continuous shaping of new 'Forms' out of existing 'Matter.' Islamic philosophy is an interesting example of this process which constitutes the continuity of human civilization." Walzer concludes that Islamic thought, based on too narrow a concept of reason, failed where Greek philosophy had failed before it.--C. E. B.
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  8.  37
    Hans Reichenbach's and C.I. Lewis's Kantian Philosophies of Science.Paul L. Franco - forthcoming - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A.
    Recent work in the history of philosophy of science details the Kantianism of philosophers often thought opposed to one another, e.g., Hans Reichenbach, C.I. Lewis, Rudolf Carnap, and Thomas Kuhn. Historians of philosophy of science in the last two decades have been particularly interested in the Kantianism of Reichenbach, Carnap, and Kuhn, and more recently, of Lewis. While recent historical work focuses on recovering the threatened-to-be-forgotten Kantian themes of early twentieth-century philosophy of science, we should not elide the differences between (...)
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  9.  71
    Ai, Me and Lewis (Abelian Implication, Material Equivalence and C I Lewis 1920).Robert K. Meyer - 2008 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 37 (2):169 - 181.
    C I Lewis showed up Down Under in 2005, in e-mails initiated by Allen Hazen of Melbourne. Their topic was the system Hazen called FL (a Funny Logic), axiomatized in passing in Lewis 1921. I show that FL is the system MEN of material equivalence with negation. But negation plays no special role in MEN. Symbolizing equivalence with → and defining ∼A inferentially as A→f, the theorems of MEN are just those of the underlying theory ME of pure material equivalence. (...)
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  10. Mind as Conceptual Structure: On Ethical Theory of C. I. Lewis’s Conceptual Pragmatism.Cheongho Lee - 2017 - Journal of Ethics 1 (113):73-89.
    Clarence I. Lewis (1883-1964) delineated the structure of mind based on his “conceptual pragmatism.” Human mind grounds itself on the ongoing dynamic interaction of relational processes, which is essentially mediated and structural. Lewis’s pragmatism anchors itself on the theory of knowledge that has the triadic structure of the given or immediate data, interpretation, and the concept. Lewis takes the a priori given as a starting point of meaningful experience. The interpretative work of mind is the mediator of the a priori (...)
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  11. Can We Trust Our Memories? C. I. Lewis's Coherence Argument.T. Shogenji & E. J. Olsson - 2004 - Synthese 142 (1):21-41.
    In this paper we examine C. I. Lewis's view on the roleof coherence – what he calls ''congruence'' – in thejustification of beliefs based on memory ortestimony. Lewis has two main theses on the subject. His negativethesis states that coherence of independent items ofevidence has no impact on the probability of a conclusionunless each item has some credibility of its own. Thepositive thesis says, roughly speaking, that coherenceof independently obtained items of evidence – such asconverging memories or testimonies – raises (...)
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  12. C. I. Lewis: History and Philosophy of Logic.John Corcoran - 2006 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (1):1-9.
    C. I. Lewis (I883-I964) was the first major figure in history and philosophy of logic—-a field that has come to be recognized as a separate specialty after years of work by Ivor Grattan-Guinness and others (Dawson 2003, 257).Lewis was among the earliest to accept the challenges offered by this field; he was the first who had the philosophical and mathematical talent, the philosophical, logical, and historical background, and the patience and dedication to objectivity needed to excel. He was blessed with (...)
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  13.  19
    C. I. Lewis: The Last Great Pragmatist.Murray G. Murphey - 2005 - State University of New York Press.
    An intellectual biography of the American philosopher C. I. Lewis.
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  14.  19
    C. I. Lewis in Focus: The Pulse of Pragmatism.Sandra B. Rosenthal - 2007 - Indiana University Press.
    C. I. Lewis was one of the most important thinkers of his generation. In this book, Sandra B. Rosenthal explores Lewis’s philosophical vision, and links his thought to the traditions of classical American pragmatism. Tracing Lewis’s influences, she explains the central concepts informing his thinking and how he developed a unique and practical vision of the human experience. She shows how Lewis contributed to the enrichment and expansion of pragmatism, opening new paths of constructive dialogue with other traditions. This book (...)
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  15.  70
    C. I. Lewis on Possible Worlds.Igor Sedlar - 2009 - History and Philosophy of Logic 30 (3):283-291.
    This article opposes a view widely accepted in studies concerning the history of modal logic, according to which (i) the approach of C. I. Lewis towards constructing modern modal logic was purely syntactical (i.e. limited to the construction of axiomatic systems S1-S5 of propositional modal logic), and (ii) the notion of a possible world was incorporated into modern logic and philosophy mainly by authors such as Rudolf Carnap and Saul Kripke. The article presents Lewis' definition of a possible world, and (...)
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  16. How to Be a Pragmatist: C. I. Lewis and Humean Skepticism.John Greco - 2006 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (1):24-31.
    Murray G. Murphey’s masterful treatment of C. I. Lewis’s philosophy leaves two things amply clear: first, that Lewis struggled with skeptical arguments from Hume throughout his career; and second, that Lewis never adequately resolved the problems raised by those arguments. In this paper I will consider Lewis’s approach to Hume’s skepticism in Mind and the World Order (MWO) and in An Analysis of Knowledge and Valuation (AKV), and I will argue that Lewis’s reply to Hume in these works did not (...)
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  17.  17
    Review of Pragmatism in Transition: Contemporary Perspectives on C.I. Lewis Ed. By Peter Olen and Carl Sachs. [REVIEW]Paul L. Franco - 2018 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 54 (2):273-280.
    In this review, I talk about the essays dealing with C.I. Lewis's place in the history of analytic philosophy and the history of philosophy of science.
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  18.  28
    C. I. Lewis, Kant, and the Reflective Method of Philosophy.Gabriele Gava - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (2):315-335.
    ABSTRACTIf it seems unquestionable that C. I. Lewis is a Kantian in important respects, it is more difficult to determine what, if anything, is original about his Kantianism. For it might be argued that Lewis’ Kantianism simply reflects an approach to the a priori which was very common in the first half of the twentieth century, namely, the effort to make the a priori relative. In this paper, I will argue that Lewis’ Kantianism does present original features. The latter can (...)
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  19.  42
    C. I. Lewis’s Theory of Meaning and Theory of Value. [REVIEW]B. R. S. - 1978 - Review of Metaphysics 32 (1):158-158.
    This examination of C. I. Lewis’s theory of meaning and theory of value argues that while Lewis’s own statement of the connection between them is inadequate, a way can be shown which allows for a connection between the two. The amount of space devoted to this endeavor is even briefer than the length of the book indicates, for the last nineteen pages consist of an appendix on Quine’s theory of meaning, and there are numbered but blank pages between chapters. The (...)
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  20.  22
    C. I. Lewis and the Benacerraf Problem.Bob Fischer - 2018 - Episteme 15 (2):154-165.
    Realists about modality offer an attractive semantics for modal discourse in terms of possible worlds, but standard accounts of the worlds—as properties, propositions, or causally-isolated concreta—invoke entities with which we can’t interact. If realism is true, how can we know anything about modal matters? Let's call this "the Benacerraf Problem." I suggest that C. I. Lewis has an intriguing answer to it. Given that we’re willing to disentangle some of Lewis’s insights from his phenomenalism, we can take the following line. (...)
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  21.  21
    Josiah Royce and C.I. Lewis: Teacher and Student with Many Shared Affinities.Jacquelyn Ann K. Kegley - 2016 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (2):220.
    In this centennial year of the death of Josiah Royce it is appropriate to explore the lines of influence between Royce as a teacher and one of his students, C.I. Lewis. First, Lewis himself acknowledged an affinity between his ‘conceptual pragmatism’ and Royce’s ‘absolute pragmatism’. Secondly, Lewis also acknowledged Royce’s influence in terms of his explorations of alternative logics. Thirdly, Lewis was called the “most influential American thinker of his generation” and a link between the philosophers of the classic period (...)
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  22.  48
    C.I. Lewis and the Issue of Phenomenalism.Robert L. Greenwood - 1985 - Philosophy Research Archives 11:441-452.
    According to the received view, the philosophy of C.I. Lewis is a form of phenomenalism. The first part of this paper is an argument designed to show that Lewis does not support one of the necessary conditions for ontological phenomenalism; namely, the sense-datum theory. The secondpart is an argument designed to show that Lewis’ theory is incompatible with linguistic phenomenalism, a view according to which there is an equivalence of meaning between physical object statements and sense-data statements. The argument is (...)
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  23.  8
    Stoickie pojęcie oznaki według I. Dąmbskiej a C.S. Peirce'a koncepcja znaczenia.Piotr Janik - 2009 - In Jerzy Perzanowski & Piotr Janik (eds.), Rozum-Serce-Smak. Ignatianum, Wydawnictwo WAM. pp. 119-130.
    Publikacja składa się z dwu zasadniczych części, z których pierwsza zawiera rozprawy poświęcone twórczości Izydory Dąmbskiej, zaś druga - jej pracy własne, publikowane poprzednio w „Kwartalniku Filozoficznym". Tom otwiera wiersz Zbigniewa Herberta „Potęga smaku" dedykowany przez poetę tej wybitnej uczonej, który to utwór dobrze oddaje, w warstwie ideowej, wartości bliskie Dąmbskiej.
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  24.  24
    Reason and Desire in C. I. Lewis.Eric B. Dayton - 1975 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 11 (4):289 - 304.
    In this paper c i lewis's theory of practical reason is discussed. the purpose is to explicate the role which value experience plays in the thinking of a rational agent who is attempting to determine imperatives of action. lewis, who vehemently opposed noncognitivism in ethics, believed that the objectivity of ethics could be shown to be the result of the logical demands of consistency upon the deliberative consciousness of an active self-determining agent. rightness, for lewis, was not primarily a moral (...)
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  25.  52
    C. I. Lewis and the Outlines of Aesthetic Experience.Paisley Nathan Livingston - 2004 - British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (4):378-392.
    The current essay describes aspects of C. I. Lewis’s rarely cited contributions to aesthetics, focusing primarily on the conception of aesthetic experience developed in An Analysis of Knowledge and Valuation. Lewis characterized aesthetic value as a proper subset of inherent value, which he understood as the power to occasion intrinsically valued experiences. He distinguished aesthetic experiences from experiences more generally in terms of eight conditions. Roughly, he proposed that aesthetic experiences have a highly positive, preponderantly intrinsic value realized through contemplation, (...)
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  26.  52
    C. I. Lewis in Focus: The Pulse of Pragmatism (Review).Melissa Bergeron - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):pp. 651-652.
    While C. I. Lewis’s most celebrated logical innovation is by no means neglected, strict implication features in Rosenthal’s discussion in a fashion parallel, one comes to understand, to its role in his broader philosophical efforts, viz., as one component of a much more ambitious philosophical enterprise. Were one pressed to apply a label to Lewis’s broader project, “epistemological” is perhaps the most fitting term, with his accomplishments in logic paving the way to this broader effort. As with Lewis, Rosenthal sets (...)
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  27.  44
    Peirce’s Summum Bonum and the Ethical Views of C. I. Lewis and John Dewey.Morton White - 1999 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (4):1029-1037.
    I am primarily concerned here with C. I. Lewis’s suggestion in a letter to me that some admitted defects in his ethical views might be removed by appealing to Peirce’s views on the summum bonum, which Peirce identified as the evolutionary process whereby the universe becomes more and more orderly. Since Lewis held in his published writings that what is morally obligatory can never be determined by empirical facts alone, I argue that since the alleged growing orderliness of the universe (...)
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  28.  11
    Peirce's Summum Bonum and the Ethical Views of C. I. Lewis and John Dewey.Morton White - 1999 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 59 (4):1029-1037.
    I am primarily concerned here with C. I. Lewis's suggestion in a letter to me that some admitted defects in his ethical views might be removed by appealing to Peirce's views on the summum bonum, which Peirce identified as the evolutionary process whereby the universe becomes more and more orderly. Since Lewis held in his published writings that what is morally obligatory can never be determined by empirical facts alone, I argue that since the alleged growing orderliness of the universe (...)
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  29.  11
    Peirce’s Summum Bonum and the Ethical Views of C. I. Lewis and John Dewey.Morton White - 1999 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (4):1029-1037.
    I am primarily concerned here with C. I. Lewis’s suggestion in a letter to me that some admitted defects in his ethical views might be removed by appealing to Peirce’s views on the summum bonum, which Peirce identified as the evolutionary process whereby the universe becomes more and more orderly. Since Lewis held in his published writings that what is morally obligatory can never be determined by empirical facts alone, I argue that since the alleged growing orderliness of the universe (...)
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  30.  22
    A Naturalistic Theory of Justice: Critical Commentary on, and Selected Readings From, C. I. Lewis' Ethics.Vincent Luizzi - 1984 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 20 (1):81-85.
    This book is designed to acquaint the reader with C.I. Lewis' ethics by providing critical commentary on Lewis' work in addition to reprinting some of Lewis' writings in ethics. The commentary is not meant to be a substitute for the complete work in ethics that Lewis was preparing before his death but merely a systematic study of some central aspects of his thought in ethics.
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  31.  13
    Editor's Introduction to C.I. Lewis and C.H. Langford 'A Note on Strict Implication'.Edwin Mares - 2014 - History and Philosophy of Logic 35 (1):1-6.
    The article ‘A Note on Strict Implication’ was submitted for publication by C.I. Lewis and C.H. Langford but withdrawn in proof. The paper is, according to notes and letters by both Lewis and Langford, largely by Lewis. It constitutes an early attempt by Lewis to give meanings for the modal connectives using abstract objects. To be necessary, for example, is for a statement to have the same intension as a truth-functional tautology. This theory prefigures the view of Lewis's 1946 book, (...)
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  32.  9
    Notes by C. I. Lewis on Empirical Knowledge, Phenomenology, and Related Topics.Fernando R. Molina - 1980 - Philosophy Research Archives 6:427-442.
    The C. I. Lewis Collection at Special Collections, Stanford University, contains papers and letters which update or expand upon topics discussed by C. I. Lewis during his professional career. This edition of Lewis' reflections on topics related to empirical knowledge and phenomenology is intended to make those materials readily available to scholars and philosophers interested in the philosophy of C. I. Lewis or in those topics represented here.
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  33.  8
    Peirce and C. I. Lewis on Quale.Joanna Szelegieniec & Szymon Nowak - 2014 - Polish Journal of Philosophy 8 (2):43-62.
    The debates about qualia are common in contemporary analytical philosophy, especially in the area of philosophy of mind or epistemology. Notwithstanding the significance of this notion in present-day investigations, there still appears to be a lack of agreement over how to understand the term “quale”. Due to this fact, our goal is to shed light on the concept of quale as it entered the modern history of philosophy. Strictly speaking, our concern shall be devoted to the American pragmatist philosophy of (...)
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  34.  7
    C.I. Lewis and the Outlines of Aesthetic Experience.Paisley Nathan Livingston - unknown
    The current essay describes aspects of C. I. Lewis’s rarely cited contributions to aesthetics, focusing primarily on the conception of aesthetic experience developed in An Analysis of Knowledge and Valuation. Lewis characterized aesthetic value as a proper subset of inherent value, which he understood as the power to occasion intrinsically valued experiences. He distinguished aesthetic experiences from experiences more generally in terms of eight conditions. Roughly, he proposed that aesthetic experiences have a highly positive, preponderantly intrinsic value realized through contemplation, (...)
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  35. A History of Philosophy in America : From the St. Louis Hegelians Through C. I. Lewis.E. Flower & M. G. Murphey - 1977 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    This volume is part two of a two-volume set. It may be purchased separately or in conjunction with volume one. Vol. II: From the St. Louis Hegelians through C. I. Lewis. and G. H. Mead.
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  36. C.I. Lewis’s Conceptual Pragmatism: The a Priori and the Given.Quentin Kammer, Jean-Philippe Narboux & Henri Wagner (eds.) - 2018 - Routledge.
    This edited collection explores the philosophy of Clarence Irving Lewis through two major concepts that are integral to his conceptual pragmatism: the a priori and the given. The relation between these two elements of knowledge form the core of Lewis’s masterpiece _Mind and the World-Order_. While Lewis’s conceptual pragmatism is directed against any conception of the _a priori_ as constraining the mind and experience, it also emphasizes the inalterability and the unavoidability of the given that remains the same through any (...)
     
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  37. «Doing Without Concepts: An Interpretation Of C. I. Lewis' Action-Oriented Foundationalism».Robert Stufflebeam - 1996 - Sorites 6:4-20.
    C. I. Lewis' action-oriented notion of cognition is consistent with a minimally representational picture of mind. I aim to show why. Toward this end, I explore some of the tensions between Lewis' theory of knowledge and his theory of mind. At face value, the former renders the latter implausible. Among other problems, no agent could act if she were required to entertain the myriad beliefs that Lewis claims figures in the guidance of action. But rather than abandon Lewis' story, I (...)
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  38. Qumran: Correnti Del Pensiero Giudaico (Iii A.C.-I D.C).Giovanni Ibba - 2007 - Carocci.
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  39.  13
    On Eth. Nic. I. C. 5.C. M. Mulvany - 1921 - Classical Quarterly 15 (2):85-98.
    In E.N. I. c. 5 Aristotle is considering divers views as to what constitutes Eudaimonia. He told us in c. 4, 2–3 that there are many conflicting opinions on the subject. The Many identify Happiness with some palpable good, such as pleasure, wealth, honour, but the Wise identify it with something beyond the Many, while [Plato] denied it to be any specific good at all. Of all these views we should consider such as have many adherents or are considered to (...)
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  40.  53
    C. I. Lewis.Susan Haack - 1985 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 19:215-238.
    Lewis's account of the role of sensory experience in empirical knowledge rests on the theses: (1) that one's apprehension of what is given in sensory experience is certain; (2) that unless there were such certain apprehension of the given, No knowledge would be possible; (3) that justification of one's other justified empirical beliefs always derives from one's apprehension of the given. I show that all three theses are false. That they are false provides further motivation for the theory of justification (...)
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  41. Geração Simples E Matéria Prima Em G.C. I.David Charles & Luis Fontes - 2003 - Cadernos de História E Filosofia da Ciência 13 (2).
    At the end of I.3, 319a29ff, Aristotle asks a series of questions. This difficult and condensed passage, whose translation is controversial at some points, raises two questions: what is what is not without qualification? and is the matter of earth and fire the same or different? In this essay, I shall focus on the second question.
     
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  42.  34
    C. I. Lewis: Susan Haack.Susan Haack - 1985 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 19:215-238.
    Lewis, according to Kuklick, was ‘a private person’, of ‘unsparing honesty and … utter dedication to the rational pursuit of truth’. He was, Kuklick continues, ‘equally uncompromising in what he expected of his readers, and as a result wrote for and lectured to a tiny group of scholars’. I hope that—since I occasionally find myself borrowing from him and frequently find myself arguing with him—I may count myself as one of the ‘tiny group of scholars’ for whom Lewis wrote. And (...)
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  43.  14
    Victoria Paz Sánchez García, El pragmatismo conceptualista de C.I. Lewis. Una revisión crítica, Secretaría de Desarrollo Institucional-Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, 2015, 249 pp. [REVIEW]Livio Mattarollo - 2017 - Dianoia 62 (79):240-244.
    Resumen: Esta nota crítica analiza la perspectiva que Martha Nussbaum presenta sobre la emoción de la ira en su último libro Anger and Forgiveness. Resentment, Generosity, Justice. Para ello sitúo esta obra en el contexto del proyecto filosófico de la autora y señalo algunos cambios y continuidades en su análisis de la ira; después reviso a la luz de este nuevo libro algunas de las críticas que, centradas en la reivindicación de la ira, ha recibido su propuesta de una cultura (...)
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  44.  37
    J.J. Caerols Perez: Sacra via (I. a.c.-I d.C.). Estudio de las fuentes escritas. (Series Maior.) Madrid: Ediciones Clasicas, 1995. [REVIEW]C. Smith - 1996 - The Classical Review 46 (1):135-137.
  45.  24
    The Philosophy of C. I. Lewis. Ed. Paul A. Schilpp.Lee C. Rice - 1970 - Modern Schoolman 47 (3):360-361.
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  46.  26
    Mind and Matter In Ryle, Ayer, and C. I. Lewis.Charles Hartshorne - 1971 - Idealistic Studies 1 (1):13-32.
    Idealism in the 'social' sense in which i accept it is defended against the three writers mentioned. topics dealt with include mind as spatial, sensation as species of feeling, 'direct intuition', singulars vs. crowds, the body as society, participation as universal principle. it is held that ryle, ayer, and lewis overlook the direct participations which alone give experience access to a world and indeed alone enable it to be experience at all.
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  47.  23
    C. I. Lewis and Dayton on Pragmatic Contradiction.Jeffrey E. Foss - 1981 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 17 (2):153 - 157.
    Dayton's account of lewis' pragmatic contradiction seriously misconstrues this key concept by analyzing it in terms of logical contradiction. this order of analysis is explicitly rejected by lewis as the reverse of the proper order in which the pragmatic concept is foundational to logic and epistemology. i outline a correct account of pragmatic contradiction. then lewis' application of the idea to moral skepticism and the liar paradox is reconsidered, and is seen to vindicate his claim that both skeptic and liar (...)
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  48.  15
    Values and Imperatives. By C. I. Lewis, Edited by John Lange. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1969. Pp. XV, 201, $7.50., The Moral Life. By Oliver A. Johnson. London: George Allen and Unwin Ltd., 1969. Pp. 107, 25s., And le Probleme de la Verite En Morale Et En Droit. By George Kalinowski. Paris: Emmanuel Vitte, 1967. Pp. 287. [REVIEW]I. Jenkins - 1971 - American Journal of Jurisprudence 16 (1):302-318.
  49.  17
    C. I. Lewis and the Similetic Use of Language.A. L. Herman - 1973 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 33 (3):349-365.
    THE PAPER ATTEMPTS TO RESCUE LEWIS'S DOCTRINE OF\nEXPRESSIVE LANGUAGE FROM THE SLOUGH INTO WHICH IT HAS\nLATELY BEEN FLUNG. THE PAPER DOES FOUR THINGS: PART I\nRECALLS LEWIS'S DOCTRINE OF EXPRESSIVE STATEMENTS\n('EXPRESSIVES'); PART II STATES THE VARIOUS CRITICISMS THAT\nHAVE BEEN SENT AGAINST THEM TOGETHER WITH CRITICISMS OF\nLEWIS'S CLAIMS THAT EXPRESSIVES WERE BOTH EMPIRICAL AND\nCERTAIN AND THAT THEY COULD SERVE AS ATOMS FOR HIS\nMOLECULAR 'TERMINATING JUDGMENTS', PART III DEMONSTRATES\nTHAT LEWIS'S EXPRESSIVES ARE REALLY SIMILES, SHARING ALL\nTHE PROPERTIES ATTRIBUTED TO SIMILES INCLUDING BEING\nCERTAIN, IN A (...)
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  50.  14
    C. I. Lewis' Analysis of Knowledge and Valuation.C. J. Ducasse - 1948 - Philosophical Review 57 (3):260-280.
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