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Christian Ineichen [5]C. Ineichen [4]
  1.  14
    Deflating the “DBS Causes Personality Changes” Bubble.Frederic Gilbert, J. N. M. Viaña & C. Ineichen - forthcoming - Neuroethics.
    The idea that deep brain stimulation induces changes to personality, identity, agency, authenticity, autonomy and self is so deeply entrenched within neuroethics discourses that it has become an unchallenged narrative. In this article, we critically assess evidence about putative effects of DBS on PIAAAS. We conducted a literature review of more than 1535 articles to investigate the prevalence of scientific evidence regarding these potential DBS-induced changes. While we observed an increase in the number of publications in theoretical neuroethics that mention (...)
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  2.  7
    Correction To: Deflating the “DBS Causes Personality Changes” Bubble.Frederic Gilbert, J. N. M. Viaña & C. Ineichen - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-1.
    Owing to an oversight, we noted that the acknowledgement section was missing from the original published version of this paper.
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  3.  11
    Ethical Focal Points in the International Practice of Deep Brain Stimulation.Markus Christen, Christian Ineichen, Merlin Bittlinger, Hans-Werner Bothe & Sabine Müller - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 5 (4):65-80.
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  4.  27
    How “Moral” Are the Principles of Biomedical Ethics? – a Cross-Domain Evaluation of the Common Morality Hypothesis.Markus Christen, Christian Ineichen & Carmen Tanner - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):47.
    The principles of biomedical ethics – autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice – are of paradigmatic importance for framing ethical problems in medicine and for teaching ethics to medical students and professionals. In order to underline this significance, Tom L. Beauchamp and James F. Childress base the principles in the common morality, i.e. they claim that the principles represent basic moral values shared by all persons committed to morality and are thus grounded in human moral psychology. We empirically investigated the relationship (...)
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  5.  9
    Correction To: Deflating the “DBS Causes Personality Changes” Bubble.Frederic Gilbert, J. N. M. Viaña & C. Ineichen - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-1.
    The article Deflating the "DBS causes personality changes" bubble, written by Frederic Gilbert, J. N. M. Viaña and C. Ineichen, was originally published electronically on the publisher’s internet portal on 19 June 2018 without open access.
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  6.  24
    Measuring Value Sensitivity in Medicine.Christian Ineichen, Markus Christen & Carmen Tanner - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):5.
    BackgroundValue sensitivity – the ability to recognize value-related issues when they arise in practice – is an indispensable competence for medical practitioners to enter decision-making processes related to ethical questions. However, the psychological competence of value sensitivity is seldom an explicit subject in the training of medical professionals. In this contribution, we outline the traditional concept of moral sensitivity in medicine and its revised form conceptualized as value sensitivity and we propose an instrument that measures value sensitivity.MethodsWe developed an instrument (...)
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  7.  6
    Deflating the Deep Brain Stimulation Causes Personality Changes Bubble: The Authors Reply.Frederic Gilbert, John Noel M. Viana & C. Ineichen - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-12.
    To conclude that there is enough or not enough evidence demonstrating that deep brain stimulation causes unintended postoperative personality changes is an epistemic problem that should be answered on the basis of established, replicable, and valid data. If prospective DBS recipients delay or refuse to be implanted because they are afraid of suffering from personality changes following DBS, and their fears are based on unsubstantiated claims made in the neuroethics literature, then researchers making these claims bear great responsibility for prospective (...)
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  8.  3
    Understanding the Effects and Adverse Reactions of Deep Brain Stimulation: Is It Time for a Paradigm Shift Toward a Focus on Heterogenous Biophysical Tissue Properties Instead of Electrode Design Only?Christian Ineichen, Naomi Ruth Shepherd & Oǧuzkan Sürücü - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.