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C. Metcalfe [3]Chris E. Metcalfe [2]
  1.  8
    The Stakeholder Corporation.Chris E. Metcalfe - 1998 - Business Ethics 7 (1):30–36.
    The stakeholder debate continues unabated in Britain in various arenas of public life and activity. “While recognising the societal holism of the stakeholder concept this article concentrates on the debate at a business level, discussing whether stakeholding is ethical, attainable, or even appropriate to business corporations”. The author is completing his MBA at London Business School and has a background of consulting in organisational and IT analysis.
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  2.  7
    The Stakeholder Corporation.Chris E. Metcalfe - 1998 - Business Ethics: A European Review 7 (1):30-36.
  3.  31
    Low Risk Research Using Routinely Collected Identifiable Health Information Without Informed Consent: Encounters with the Patient Information Advisory Group.C. Metcalfe, R. M. Martin, S. Noble, J. A. Lane, F. C. Hamdy, D. E. Neal & J. L. Donovan - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (1):37-40.
    Current UK legislation is impacting upon the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of medical record-based research aimed at benefiting the NHS and the public heath. Whereas previous commentators have focused on the Data Protection Act 1998, the Health and Social Care Act 2001 is the key legislation for public health researchers wishing to access medical records without written consent. The Act requires researchers to apply to the Patient Information Advisory Group for permission to access medical records without written permission. We present a (...)
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  4.  8
    Low Risk Research Using Routinely Collected Identifiable Health Information Without Informed Consent: Encounters with the Patient Information Advisory Group.C. Metcalfe, R. M. Martin, S. Noble, J. A. Lane, F. C. Hamdy & J. L. de NealDonovan - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (1):37-40.
    Current UK legislation is impacting upon the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of medical record-based research aimed at benefiting the NHS and the public heath. Whereas previous commentators have focused on the Data Protection Act 1998, the Health and Social Care Act 2001 is the key legislation for public health researchers wishing to access medical records without written consent. The Act requires researchers to apply to the Patient Information Advisory Group for permission to access medical records without written permission. We present a (...)
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