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Charles D. Tarlton [11]C. Tarlton [3]Charles Tarlton [2]
  1.  17
    Historicity, Meaning, and Revisionism in the Study of Political Thought.Charles D. Tarlton - 1973 - History and Theory 12 (3):307-328.
    J. G. A. Pocock, Quentin Skinner, and John Dunn try to introduce historicity into the study of political thought. Believing that meaning is relational, they attempt to build cognitive contexts in which to fit events. Yet, their structural focus is often either ill-defined or overly simplified. They claim that if any statement is fixed into its proper context, the context will help to explain it. But the historical context is not always clearly understood itself; this is acting under the "illusion (...)
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  2.  51
    The Despotical Doctrine of Hobbes, Part I: The Liberalization of Leviathan.C. Tarlton - 2001 - History of Political Thought 22 (4):587-618.
    At least from Bentham's time, the dominant interpretive approaches to Hobbes's Leviathan have tended to soften and blur the despotic message of that book. Writers of otherwise very different persuasions and pursuing very different intellectual agendas have sought to soften the way Hobbes's political theory has been understood. In the effort to insulate and preserve obviously valuable aspects of that theory, the elements of tyranny so significant to the text of Leviathan have been ignored, distorted, obscured and denied. The upshot (...)
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  3.  76
    Does Chapter 5 of Locke's Second Treatise, ‘of PROPERTY,’ Deconstruct Itself?Charles D. Tarlton - 2006 - Philosophy 81 (1):107-127.
    Chapter 5 of John Locke's Second Treatise, ‘Of Property,” is a text that undermines itself, stammering to an unresolved and irresolvable conclusion because the structure of conditions upon which most of its moral argument about private property is based cannot be stretched to encompass the sudden twist Locke tries to make at the end. The moral conditions by which Locke defines a virtuous private possession within God's gift of the world to all mankind in common resist being extended to include (...)
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  4.  5
    Rehabilitating Hobbes: Obligation, Anti-Fascism and the Myth of a ‘Taylor Thesis’.C. Tarlton - 1998 - History of Political Thought 19 (3):407-438.
    A.E. Taylor's 1938 essay, ‘The Ethical Doctrine of Hobbes’, was widely and for a long time thought to provide the basis of a deontological interpretation of Hobbes that was so distinctive and compelling that it came to constitute the basis of a ‘Taylor thesis’, an analytical construct long prominent in Hobbes Studies. But, the ‘Taylor thesis’ was a myth. First, Taylor's essay of 1938 were, in reality thin, and not well-argued; neither did they stimulate any contemporary response at all from (...)
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  5.  49
    Levitating Leviathan: Glosses on a Theme in Hobbes.Charles D. Tarlton - 1977 - Ethics 88 (1):1-19.
  6.  20
    “Azioni in Modo L’Una Dall’Altra”: Action for Action's Sake in Machiavelli's The Prince : [Political Action, Machiavelli, Virtù and Fortuna, The Prince, Political Causality].Charles D. Tarlton - 2003 - History of European Ideas 29 (2):123-140.
    It has come to be increasingly recognized that The Prince fails to offer a viable and practical guide to successful political action. Violent force provides Machiavelli's theory with the only even tentative form of purposive action he can theoretically sustain. In violence, elements of the action itself seem to appear as consequences, thus restoring a semblance of connection between deliberate action and outcomes. As a result, successful political action becomes less a question of examples and precepts than a matter of (...)
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  7.  5
    Books in Review.Charles D. Tarlton - 1988 - Political Theory 16 (2):335-339.
  8.  25
    Idealism and the Higher Morality Versus Democracy: Using Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morals to Revisit Bradley's Ethical Studies.Charles D. Tarlton - 2005 - Theory and Event 8 (4).
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  9. Maria J. Falco, Ed., Feminist Interpretations of Machiavelli. [REVIEW]Charles Tarlton - 2005 - Philosophy in Review 25:351-354.
  10.  47
    Political Desire and the Idea of Murder in Machiavelli's the Prince.Charles D. Tarlton - 2002 - Philosophy 77 (1):39-66.
    Machiavelli's much advertised science of politics turns out, in the long run, to falter. Machiavelli's various stratagems for controlling political outcomes are workable a small percentage of the time at best. Unpredictability works continually against the theory of practical action. A large part of Machiavelli's adaptation to this deficiency is to turn at many crucial moments, to the unambiguous and startling clarity of murder as a political instrument. It is this central position of murder that helps to account for worrying (...)
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  11.  38
    Reason and History in Locke's Second Treatise.Charles D. Tarlton - 2004 - Philosophy 79 (2):247-279.
    The idea of an original contract is, ironically, inherently narrative in form; although tautological in essence, it nevertheless portrays events occurring in sequence. In response to Filmer's provocations that the idea of an original contract lacks historical veracity, Locke tries and repeatedly fails to establish a direct historical substantiation of his position in the early chapters of the Second Treatise. The most important of these various miscalculations concern the role of consent in his account of the origins of government, the (...)
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  12.  34
    Race and Racism in Modern Philosophy by Andrew Valls (Ed.) Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 2005, Pp. 193.Charles D. Tarlton - 2007 - Philosophy 82 (1):183-187.
  13.  3
    Race and Racism in Modern Philosophy. [REVIEW]Charles Tarlton - 2007 - Philosophy 82 (1):183-187.
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  14. Silvia J. Falco, Ed., Femmist Interpretations of Machiavelli Reviewed By.Charles D. Tarlton - 2005 - Philosophy in Review 25 (5):351-354.
     
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  15.  35
    ‘To Avoyd the Present Stroke of Death:’ Despotical Dominion, Force, and Legitimacy in Hobbe's Leviathan.Charles D. Tarlton - 1999 - Philosophy 74 (2):221-245.
    The logic of Leviathan is formally made to derive commonwealth and the rights of sovereignty (the obligations of subjects, read the other way around) from an elaborate process beginning in the physiology of human perception and passions, through language and reason, into the state of nature (the war of all against all) and, finally, under the direction of the laws of nature, to a collective and formal resignation of all their natural rights to create an absolute sovereign. This process of (...)
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  16. The Despotical Doctrine of Hobbes, Part Ii: Aspects of the Textual Substructure of Tyranny in Leviathan.C. Tarlton - 2002 - History of Political Thought 23 (1):62-89.
    Part I having argued that the history of the modern reception of Hobbes's Leviathan shows a pattern of distortion in the reading of its despotical character, Part II tries to reveal more clearly the ways in which Hobbes's political theory was a doctrine of tyranny. To this end, the essay uses Lockean political liberty as a negative heuristic to help reveal the oppressive principles in Leviathan, explores the conception of ‘arbitration’ in Hobbes to see how the utter surrender of liberty (...)
     
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