Order:
Disambiguations
Christopher Viger [14]Christopher D. Viger [6]C. Viger [3]Christopher David Viger [2]
See also
Christopher Viger
University of Western Ontario
  1. Frame Problem.C. Viger - 2006 - In Keith Brown (ed.), Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. Elsevier. pp. 610--613.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2. Is the Aim of Perception to Provide Accurate Representations? A Case for the 'No' Side.Christopher D. Viger - 2006 - In Robert J. Stainton (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Cognitive Science. Malden MA: Blackwell.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3.  14
    The Acquired Language of Thought Hypothesis: A Theory of Symbol Grounding.Christopher Viger - 2007 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 8 (1):125-142.
  4.  89
    St. Anselm's Ontological Argument Succumbs to Russell's Paradox.Christopher Viger - 2002 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 52 (3):123-128.
  5. Learning to Think: A Response to the Language of Thought Argument for Innateness.Christopher Viger - 2005 - Mind and Language 20 (3):313-25.
    Jerry Fodor's argument for an innate language of thought continues to be a hurdle for researchers arguing that natural languages provide us with richer conceptual systems than our innate cognitive resources. I argue that because the logical/formal terms of natural languages are given a usetheory of meaning, unlike predicates, logical/formal terms might be learned without a mediating internal representation. In that case, our innate representational system might have less logical structure than a natural language, making it possible that we augment (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  6.  34
    The Acquired Language of Thought Hypothesis.Christopher Viger - 2007 - Interaction Studies 8 (1):125-142.
    I present the symbol grounding problem in the larger context of a materialist theory of content and then present two problems for causal, teleo-functional accounts of content. This leads to a distinction between two kinds of mental representations: presentations and symbols; only the latter are cognitive. Based on Milner and Goodale’s dual route model of vision, I posit the existence of precise interfaces between cognitive systems that are activated during object recognition. Interfaces are constructed as a child learns, and is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  7.  48
    Where Do Dennett's Stances Stand? Explaining Our Kinds of Minds.Christopher D. Viger - 2000 - In Andrew Brook, Don Ross & David L. Thompson (eds.), Dennett's Philosophy: A Comprehensive Assessment. MIT Press.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8.  89
    Sort-of Symbols?Daniel C. Dennett & Christopher D. Viger - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):613-613.
    Barsalou's elision of the personal and sub-personal levels tends to conceal the fact that he is, at best, providing the “specs” but not yet a model for his hypothesized perceptual symbols.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9.  86
    Locking on to the Language of Thought.Christopher David Viger - 2001 - Philosophical Psychology 14 (2):203-215.
    I demonstrate that locking on, a key notion in Jerry Fodor's most recent theory of content, supplemented informational atomism (SIA), is cashed out in terms of asymmetric dependence, the central notion in his earlier theory of content. I use this result to argue that SIA is incompatible with the language of thought hypothesis because the constraints on the causal relations into which symbols can enter imposed by the theory of content preclude the causal relations needed between symbols for them to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  98
    Review of Jerry A. Fodor's Concepts: Where Cognitive Science Went Wrong[REVIEW]Robert J. Stainton & Christopher D. Viger - 2000 - Synthese 123 (1):131-151.
  11.  7
    Presentations and Symbols: What Cognition Requires for Representationalism.Christopher Viger - 2006 - ProtoSociology 22:40-59.
    I consider how several results from cognitive science bear on the nature of representation and how representations might be structured. Distinguishing two notions of representation, presentations, which are cases of direct sensing, and symbols, which stand in for something else, I argue that only symbols pose a philosophical problem for naturalizing content. What is required is an account of how one thing can stand in for another. Milner and Goodale’s dual route model of vision offers a model for this ‘stand-in’ (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  21
    Introduction.Maite Ezcurdia, Robert J. Stainton & Christopher Viger - 2004 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (Supplement):7-13.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  39
    The Possibility of Subisomorphic Experiential Differences.Christopher D. Viger - 1999 - Brain and Behavioral Sciences 22 (6):975-975.
    Palmer=s main intuition pump, the Acolor machine, @ greatly underestimates the complexity of a system isomorphic in color experience to humans. The neuroscientific picture of this complexity makes clear that the brain actively produces our experiences by processes that science can investigate, thereby supporting functionalism and leaving no (color) room for a passive observer to witness subisomorphic experiential differences.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  3
    Review of Concepts by Jerry Fodor. [REVIEW]R. J. Stainton & C. Viger - 2000 - Synthese 123 (1):131-51.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  6
    The Possibility of Subisomorphic Experiential Differences.Christopher D. Viger - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (6):975-975.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16.  33
    Is Hirsch or Wilson Confused? A Commentary on "The Pitfalls of Heritability ".Daniel Dennett & Christopher Viger - unknown
    In "The pitfalls of heritability," a review of Edward O. Wilson’s Consilience Times Literary Supplement, Feb 12, 1999, p33], Jerry Hirsch claims to have convicted Wilson of a "confusion about genetic similarity and difference." In his book, Wilson claims that if we assume that "a mere one thousand genes out of the fifty to a hundred thousand genes in the human genome were to exist in two forms in the population," the probability of any two humans--excluding identical siblings--having the same (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. New Essays in the Philosophy of Language of Mind.Maite Ezcurida, Robert J. Stainton & Christopher Viger (eds.) - 2005 - University of Calgary Press.
    This volume contains fourteen essays discussing recent issues in the philosophy of language and the philosophy of mind. The collection is arranged into three sections: one on language, one on the intersection of language and mind, and a final section on mind. The topics include the context-sensitivity of semantics, anaphora, proper names, the nature of understanding, folk psychology and the Theory of Mind, self-awareness, the structure of the human mind and the extent to which it is modular, among others.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  24
    Compositionality, Context, and Semantic Values: Essays in Honor of Ernie Lepore.Robert Stainton & Christopher Viger (eds.) - 2008 - Springer.
  19. Essays in Honour of Ernie Lepore.Robert J. Stainton & Christopher Viger - unknown
    I met Ernie in 1965 on the wrestling mats of our high school in North Bergen, New Jersey, a township on top of the plateau overlooking Hoboken and across the Hudson River from Manhattan. Hoboken then was still the Hoboken of Elia Kazan’s “On the Waterfront” (1954).1 Even though the Hudson was less than a mile across at that point, it was a wide spiritual divide. We were Jersey boys, not New Yorkers. Ernie was as ambitious as I was about (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  57
    New Essays in Philosophy of Language and Mind, Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 30.R. Stanton, M. Ezcurdia & C. Viger (eds.) - 2004 - University of Calgary Press.
  21. Andrew Brook and Kathleen Akins, Eds. Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement. [REVIEW]Christopher Viger - 2008 - Philosophy in Review 28 (3):173-176.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Joseph S. Catalano, Thinking Matter: Consciousness From Aristotle to Putnam and Sartre Reviewed By.Christopher Viger - 2001 - Philosophy in Review 21 (2):98-100.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Peter Carruthers and Andrew Chamberlain, Eds., Evolution and the Human Mind: Modularity, Language and Meta-Cognition Reviewed By.Christopher Viger - 2001 - Philosophy in Review 21 (5):325-327.
  24.  3
    The Philosopher’s Paradox.Christopher Viger, Carl Hoefer & Daniel Viger - 2019 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 34 (3):407-421.
    We offer a novel argument for one-boxing in Newcomb’s Problem. The intentional states of a rational person are psychologically coherent across time, and rational decisions are made against this backdrop. We compare this coherence constraint with a golf swing, which to be effective must include a follow-through after the ball is in flight. Decisions, like golf swings, are extended processes, and their coherence with other psychological states of a player in the Newcomb scenario links her choice with the way she (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark