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Catherine Wilson [174]Curtis Wilson [39]Colin Wilson [29]C. Wilson [9]
Charlotte Wilson [8]Christopher Wilson [4]Craig Wilson [3]Camille M. Wilson [3]

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Catherine Wilson
CUNY Graduate Center
Catherine Wilson
The Graduate Center, CUNY
Conor Mayo-Wilson
University of Washington
3 more
  1.  73
    Grounding Conceptual Knowledge in Modality-Specific Systems.Lawrence W. Barsalou, W. Kyle Simmons, Aron K. Barbey & Christine D. Wilson - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):84-91.
  2.  25
    Learning Phonology With Substantive Bias: An Experimental and Computational Study of Velar Palatalization.Colin Wilson - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (5):945-982.
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  3. Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory.Sandra Lee Bartky, Paul Benson, Sue Campbell, Claudia Card, Robin S. Dillon, Jean Harvey, Karen Jones, Charles W. Mills, James Lindemann Nelson, Margaret Urban Walker, Rebecca Whisnant & Catherine Wilson - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Moral psychology studies the features of cognition, judgement, perception and emotion that make human beings capable of moral action. Perspectives from feminist and race theory immensely enrich moral psychology. Writers who take these perspectives ask questions about mind, feeling, and action in contexts of social difference and unequal power and opportunity. These essays by a distinguished international cast of philosophers explore moral psychology as it connects to social life, scientific studies, and literature.
     
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  4.  92
    Epicureanism at the Origins of Modernity.Catherine Wilson - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    This landmark study examines the role played by the rediscovery of the writings of the ancient atomists, Epicurus and Lucretius, in the articulation of the major philosophical systems of the seventeenth century, and, more broadly, their influence on the evolution of natural science and moral and political philosophy. The target of sustained and trenchant philosophical criticism by Cicero, and of opprobrium by the Christian Fathers of the early Church, for its unflinching commitment to the absence of divine supervision and the (...)
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  5.  19
    Political Connections and Industrial Pollution: Evidence Based on State Ownership and Environmental Levies in China.Min Maung, Craig Wilson & Xiaobo Tang - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (4):649-659.
    We investigate how state involvement in the ownership of non-listed entrepreneurial firms affects pollution fees levied by national and provincial governments in China. While the national government sets minimum environmental standards, provincial governments can enact requirements that exceed these minimums, and they are largely responsible for enforcing even the national standards, so environmental levies can measure concessions that provinces make to encourage development and employment. Furthermore, state ownership is a good proxy for a firm’s political connections, which can influence the (...)
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  6.  21
    Perceptual Acquaintance From Descartes to Reid. [REVIEW]Catherine Wilson - 1986 - Philosophical Review 95 (1):105.
  7. Cognitive Biases, Linguistic Universals, and Constraint‐Based Grammar Learning.Jennifer Culbertson, Paul Smolensky & Colin Wilson - 2013 - Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (3):392-424.
    According to classical arguments, language learning is both facilitated and constrained by cognitive biases. These biases are reflected in linguistic typology—the distribution of linguistic patterns across the world's languages—and can be probed with artificial grammar experiments on child and adult learners. Beginning with a widely successful approach to typology (Optimality Theory), and adapting techniques from computational approaches to statistical learning, we develop a Bayesian model of cognitive biases and show that it accounts for the detailed pattern of results of artificial (...)
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  8. The Invisible World: Early Modern Philosophy and the Invention of the Microscope.Catherine Wilson - 1995 - Journal of the History of Biology 29 (3):466-468.
     
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  9. Fostering Community Life and Human Civility in Academic Departments Through Covenant Practice.Carol A. Mullen, Silvia C. Bettez & Camille M. Wilson - 2011 - Educational Studies: Journal of the American Educational Studies Association 47 (3):280-305.
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  10. Moral Progress Without Moral Realism.Catherine Wilson - 2010 - Philosophical Papers 39 (1):97-116.
    This paper argues that we can acknowledge the existence of moral truths and moral progress without being committed to moral realism. Rather than defending this claim through the more familiar route of the attempted analysis of the ontological commitments of moral claims, I show how moral belief change for the better shares certain features with theoretical progress in the natural sciences. Proponents of the better theory are able to convince their peers that it is formally and empirically superior to its (...)
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  11.  7
    Ethics Briefing.Charlotte Wilson, Ruth Campbell, Veronica English, Rebecca Mussell, Julian C. Sheather & Sophie Brannan - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (8):566-568.
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  12. Leibniz's Metaphysics.Catherine Wilson - 1989 - Princeton Up.
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  13. Lucretius and the History of Science.Monte Ransome Johnson & Catherine Wilson - 2007 - In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.
    An overview of the influence of Lucretius poem On the Nature of Things (De Rerum Natura) on the renaissance and scientific revolution of the seventeenth century, and an examination of its continuing influence over physical atomism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
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  14. Epicureanism: A Very Short Introduction.Catherine Wilson - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Epicureanism is commonly associated with a carefree view of life and the pursuit of pleasures, particularly the pleasures of the table. However it was a complex and distinctive system of philosophy that emphasized simplicity and moderation, and considered nature to consist of atoms and the void. Epicureanism is a school of thought whose legacy continues to reverberate today.In this Very Short Introduction, Catherine Wilson explains the key ideas of the School, comparing them with those of the rival Stoics and with (...)
     
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  15. On Some Alledged Limitations to Moral Endeavor.Catherine Wilson - 1993 - Journal of Philosophy 90 (6):275-289.
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  16.  17
    Consciousness as a Biological Phenomenon.Catherine Wilson - 2018 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 25:71-87.
    Reversing centuries of methodological caution and skepticism, philosophers have begun to explore the possibility that experience in some form is widely distributed in the universe. It has been proposed that consciousness may pertain to machines, rocks, elementary particles, and perhaps the universe itself. This paper shows why philosophers have good reason to suppose that experiences are widely distributed in living nature, including worms and insects, but why panpsychism extending to non-living nature is an implausible doctrine.
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  17.  8
    Ethics Briefing.Charlotte Wilson, Veronica English, Julian C. Sheather, Ruth Campbell, Olivia Lines & Sophie Brannan - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (2):147-148.
    The British Medical Association and Royal College of Physicians have published new guidance, endorsed by the General Medical Council, on decision-making about clinically assisted nutrition and hydration and adults who lack capacity to consent. The development of the guidance follows a series of legal cases which has created confusion about the precise circumstances in which an application to the court is required before CANH is withdrawn which has culminated with the decision of the Supreme Court in National Health Service Trust (...)
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  18.  18
    Building Bridges: Knowledge Production, Publication and Use. Commentary on Tonelli (2006), Integrating Evidence Into Clinical Practice: An Alternative to Evidence‐Based Approaches.Rene Geanellos & Chris Wilson - 2006 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (3):299-305.
  19. V—Moral Truth: Observational or Theoretical?Catherine Wilson - 2011 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (1pt1):97-114.
    Moral properties are widely held to be response‐dependent properties of actions, situations, events and persons. There is controversy as to whether the putative response‐dependence of these properties nullifies any truth‐claims for moral judgements, or rather supports them. The present paper argues that moral judgements are more profitably compared with theoretical judgements in the natural sciences than with the judgements of immediate sense‐perception. The notion of moral truth is dependent on the notion of moral knowledge, which in turn is best understood (...)
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  20. Kontinuität Und Mechanismus: Zur Philosophie des Jungen Leibniz in Ihrem Ideengeschichtlichen Kontext. [REVIEW]Richard Arthur, Christia Mercer, Justin Smith & Catherine Wilson - 1997 - The Leibniz Review 7:25-64.
  21. Descartes and Cartesianism: Essays in Honour of Desmond Clarke.Stephen Gaukroger & Catherine Wilson (eds.) - 2017 - Oxford University Press.
    This collection of original essays deals with Cartesian themes and problems, especially as these arise in connection with Cartesian natural science and the theory of perception, agency, mentality, divinity, and the passions. It focuses in particular on Desmond Clarke's important contributions to these aspects of Descartes's writings.
     
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  22. The Moral Epistemology of Locke's Essay.Catherine Wilson - 2007 - In Lex Newman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Locke's "Essay Concerning Human Understanding". Cambridge University Press.
  23.  3
    The Importance of Lexical Verbs in the Acquisition of Spatial Prepositions: The Case of in and On.Kristen Johannes, Colin Wilson & Barbara Landau - 2016 - Cognition 157:174-189.
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  24. Descartes's Meditations: An Introduction.Catherine Wilson - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this introduction to a classic philosophical text, Catherine Wilson examines the arguments of Descartes' famous Meditations, the book which launched modern philosophy. Drawing on the reinterpretations of Descartes' thought of the past twenty-five years, she shows how Descartes constructs a theory of the mind, the body, nature, and God from a premise of radical uncertainty. She discusses in detail the historical context of Descartes' writings and their relationship to early modern science, and at the same time she introduces concepts (...)
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  25.  23
    Phosphatidylinositol‐4‐Phosphate: The Golgi and Beyond.Maria A. De Matteis, Cathal Wilson & Giovanni D'Angelo - 2013 - Bioessays 35 (7):612-622.
  26.  76
    Two Opponents of Material Atomism.Catherine Wilson - 2007 - In P. Phemister & S. Brown (eds.), Leibniz and the English-Speaking World. Springer. pp. 35--50.
  27.  71
    The Cambridge Companion to Malebranche. [REVIEW]Catherine Wilson & Steven Nadler - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (1):108.
    The French philosopher and theologian Nicholas Malebranche was one of the most important thinkers of the early modern period. A bold and unorthodox thinker, he tried to synthesize the new philosophy of Descartes with the religious Platonism of St. Augustine. This is the first collection of essays to address Malebranche's thought comprehensively and systematically. There are chapters devoted to Malebranche's metaphysics, his doctrine of the soul, his epistemology, the celebrated debate with Arnauld, his philosophical method, his occasionalism and theory of (...)
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  28.  64
    Love of God and Love of Creatures: The Masham-Astell Debate.Catherine Wilson - 2004 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 21 (3):281 - 298.
  29.  84
    Plenitude and Compossibility in Leibniz.Catherine Wilson - 2000 - The Leibniz Review 10:1-20.
    Leibniz entertained the idea that, as a set of “striving possibles” competes for existence, the largest and most perfect world comes into being. The paper proposes 8 criteria for a Leibniz-world. It argues that a) there is no algorithm e.g., one involving pairwise compossibility-testing that can produce even possible Leibniz-worlds; b) individual substances presuppose completed worlds; c) the uniqueness of the actual world is a matter of theological preference, not an outcome of the assembly-process; and d) Goedel’s theorem implies that (...)
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  30.  13
    Towards a Thinking and Practice of Sexual Difference: Putting the Practice of Relationship at the Centre.Caroline Wilson - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (2):202-215.
    This article seeks to open up a discussion of issues relating to the significance of sexual difference, the thinking and politics emerging from it and how it might affect educational philosophy. It briefly examines the initial work of Luce Irigaray, which has become quite influential in parts of the English speaking world, particularly focussing on the idea that there are implications for our educational objectives if gender equality were to be put in question as one of the underlying paradigms with (...)
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  31.  82
    Literature and Knowledge.Catherine Wilson - 1983 - Philosophy 58 (226):489 - 496.
    There is probably no subject in the philosophy of art which has prompted more impassioned theorizing than the question of the ‘cognitive value’ of works of art. ‘In the end’, one influential critic has stated, ‘I do not distinguish between science and art except as regards method. Both provide us with a view of reality and both are indispensable to a complete understanding of the universe.’ If a man is not prepared to distinguish between science and art one may well (...)
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  32. The Relationship Between Social Networking Site Use and the Internalization of a Thin Ideal in Females: A Meta-Analytic Review.John Mingoia, Amanda D. Hutchinson, Carlene Wilson & David H. Gleaves - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  33.  28
    Another Darwinian Aesthetics.Catherine Wilson - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (3):237-252.
    I offer a Darwinian perspective on the existence of aesthetic interests, tastes, preferences, and productions. It is distinguished from the approaches of Denis Dutton and Geoffrey Miller, drawing instead on Richard O. Prum's notion of biotic artworlds. The relevance of neuroaesthetics to the philosophy of art is defended.
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  34. Descartes and the Corporeal Mind: Some Implications of the Regius Affair.Catherine Wilson - 2000 - In John Schuster, Stephen Gaukroger & John Sutton (eds.), Descartes' Natural Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 659--79.
     
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  35.  26
    Managing Expectations: Locke on the Material Mind and Moral Mediocrity.Catherine Wilson - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:127-146.
    Locke's insistence on the limits of knowledge and the ‘mediocrity’ of our epistemological equipment is well understood; it is rightly seen as integrated with his causal theory of ideas and his theory of judgment. Less attention has been paid to the mediocrity theme as it arises in his theory of moral agency. Locke sees definite limits to human willpower. This is in keeping with post-Puritan theology with its new emphasis on divine mercy as opposed to divine justice and recrimination. It (...)
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  36.  87
    Darwin and Nietzsche.Catherine Wilson - 2013 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (2):354-370.
  37.  24
    Hume and Vital Materialism.Catherine Wilson - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (5):1002-1021.
    ABSTRACTHume was not a philosopher famed for what are sometimes called ‘ontological commitments'. Nevertheless, few contemporary scholars doubt that Hume was an atheist, and the present essay tenders the view that Hume was favourably disposed to the 'vital materialism' of post-Newtonian natural philosophers in England, Scotland and France. Both internalist arguments, collating passages from a range of Hume's works, and externalist arguments, reviewing the likely sources of his knowledge of ancient materialism and his association with his materialistic contemporaries are employed.
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  38.  43
    The Doors of Perception and the Artist Within.Catherine Wilson - 2015 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 89 (1):1-20.
    This paper discusses the significance for the philosophy of perception and aesthetics of certain productions of the ‘offline brain’. These are experienced in hypnagogic and other trance states, and in disease- or drug-induced hallucination. They bear a similarity to other visual patterns in nature, and reappear in human artistry, especially of the craft type. The reasons behind these resonances are explored, along with the question why we are disposed to find geometrical complexity and ‘supercolouration’ beautiful. The paper concludes with a (...)
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  39.  19
    13 The Reception of Leibniz in the Eighteenth Century.Catherine Wilson - 1995 - In Nicholas Jolley (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Leibniz. Cambridge University Press. pp. 442.
  40.  21
    Plenitude and Compossibility in Leibniz.Catherine Wilson - 2000 - The Leibniz Review 10:1-20.
    Leibniz entertained the idea that, as a set of “striving possibles” competes for existence, the largest and most perfect world comes into being. The paper proposes 8 criteria for a Leibniz-world. It argues that a) there is no algorithm e.g., one involving pairwise compossibility-testing that can produce even possible Leibniz-worlds; b) individual substances presuppose completed worlds; c) the uniqueness of the actual world is a matter of theological preference, not an outcome of the assembly-process; and d) Goedel’s theorem implies that (...)
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  41. 'Compossibility, Expression, Accommodation'.Catherine Wilson - 2005 - In Donald Rutherford J. A. Cover (ed.), Leibniz: Nature and Freedom. Oxford University Press. pp. 108--20.
     
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  42.  20
    Newton and Some Philosophers on Kepler's "Laws".Curtis Wilson - 1974 - Journal of the History of Ideas 35 (2):231.
  43. Leibniz.Catherine Wilson - 2001
     
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  44. Leibnizian Optimism.Catherine Wilson - 1983 - Journal of Philosophy 80 (11):765-783.
  45.  32
    Phenomenology as a Mystical Discipline.Colin Wilson - 2006 - Philosophy Now 56:15-19.
  46. De Ipsa Natura: Leibniz on Substance, Force and Activity.Catherine Wilson - 1987 - Studia Leibnitiana 19:148.
     
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  47.  48
    Mach, Musil, and Modernism.Catherine Wilson - 2014 - The Monist 97 (1):138-155.
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  48.  76
    Margaret Dauler Wilson: A Life in Philosophy.Catherine Wilson - 1999 - The Leibniz Review 9:1-15.
    Margaret Wilson, who died last year, has been described as the most eminent English-language historian of early modern philosophy of her generation. She was President of the Leibniz Society of North America for four years, from 1986 to 1990. Within this organization she is remembered both for her contributions to Leibniz-studies and for her attention to and support of younger researchers and her governing role in the Society. Her Harvard Ph.D. dissertation on “Leibniz’s Doctrine of Necessary Truth,” written under the (...)
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  49.  64
    Leibniz and Atomism.Catherine Wilson - 1982 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 13 (3):175.
  50.  62
    Grief and the Poet.C. Wilson - 2013 - British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):77-91.
    Poetry, drama and the novel present readers and viewers with emotionally significant situations that they often experience as moving, and their being so moved is one of the principal motivations for engaging with fictions. If emotions are considered as action-prompting beliefs about the environment, the appetite for sad or frightening drama and literature is difficult to explain, insofar nothing tragic or frightening is actually happening to the reader, and people do not normally enjoy being sad or frightened. The paper argues (...)
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