Results for 'COVID-19'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
  1. COVID-19: Against a Lockdown Approach.Steven R. Kraaijeveld - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (2):195-212.
    Governments around the world have faced the challenge of how to respond to the recent outbreak of a novel coronavirus disease. Some have reacted by greatly restricting the freedom of citizens, while others have opted for less drastic policies. In this paper, I draw a parallel with vaccination ethics to conceptualize two distinct approaches to COVID-19 that I call altruistic and lockdown. Given that the individual measures necessary to limit the spread of the virus can in principle be achieved (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2. COVID-19 Vaccination Should Not Be Mandatory for Health and Social Care Workers.Daniel Rodger & Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2022 - The New Bioethics 28 (1):27-39.
    A COVID-19 vaccine mandate is being introduced for health and social care workers in England, and those refusing to comply will either be redeployed or have their employment terminated. We argue th...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  14
    Politicizing COVID-19 Vaccines in the Press: A Critical Discourse Analysis.Ali Haif Abbas - 2022 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 35 (3):1167-1185.
    Undoubtedly and unfortunately, COVID-19 pandemic has been politicized in media see Abbas, Rui Zhang. Although vaccines play a crucial role in eliminating the pandemic, they have been politicized by media. This article aims to show how COVID-19 vaccines are politicized in the press. The article collects some selected reports on vaccines taken from American and Chinese media. The reports are analyzed according to an analytical framework suggested by the researcher. The framework and data collection and description are clearly (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  46
    Covid‐19: Ethical Challenges for Nurses.Georgina Morley, Christine Grady, Joan McCarthy & Connie M. Ulrich - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (3):35-39.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  5.  30
    COVID-19 Vaccination Status Should Not Be Used in Triage Tie-Breaking.Olivia Schuman, Joelle Robertson-Preidler & Trevor M. Bibler - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics:1-3.
    This article discusses the triage response to the COVID-19 delta variant surge of 2021. One issue that distinguishes the delta wave from earlier surges is that by the time it became the predominant strain in the USA in July 2021, safe and effective vaccines against COVID-19 had been available for all US adults for several months. We consider whether healthcare professionals and triage committees would have been justified in prioritising patients with COVID-19 who are vaccinated above those (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. The Covid-19 Pandemic and the Bounds of Grief.Louise Richardson, Matthew Ratcliffe, Becky Millar & Eleanor Byrne - 2021 - Think 20 (57):89-101.
    ABSTRACTThis article addresses the question of whether certain experiences that originate in causes other than bereavement are properly termed ‘grief’. To do so, we focus on widespread experiences of grief that have been reported during the Covid-19 pandemic. We consider two potential objections to a more permissive use of the term: grief is, by definition, a response to a death; grief is subject to certain norms that apply only to the case of bereavement. Having shown that these objections are (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7.  99
    Against COVID‐19 Vaccination of Healthy Children.Steven R. Kraaijeveld, Rachel Gur-Arie & Euzebiusz Jamrozik - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (6):687-698.
  8.  15
    COVID-19 and its Challenges for the Healthcare System in Pakistan.Atiqa Khalid & Sana Ali - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 12 (4):551-564.
    This article aims to highlight the healthcare issues raised by COVID-19 in Pakistan’s scenario. Initially, Pakistan lacked “standard operating procedures,” and the government had to ship testing kits from China and Japan. Moreover, due to violations of the lockdown and standard operating procedures (SOPs), the rapidly increasing number of cases created a burden on the healthcare system. More and more, this pandemic and its impact have grown. As vaccine development has not been successful yet, “herd immunity” can only be (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  9.  35
    COVID-19: Where is the National Ethical Guidance?Richard Huxtable - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-3.
    BackgroundAs the COVID-19 pandemic develops, healthcare professionals are looking for support with, and guidance to inform, the difficult decisions they face. In the absence of an authoritative national steer in England, professional bodies and local organisations have been developing and disseminating their own ethical guidance. Questions inevitably arise, some of which are particularly pressing during the pandemic, as events are unfolding quickly and the field is becoming crowded. My central question here is: which professional ethical guidance should the professional (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  10.  31
    COVID-19 Pandemic: A Litmus Test of Trust in the Health System.Vijayaprasad Gopichandran, Sudharshini Subramaniam & Maria Jusler Kalsingh - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 12 (2):213-221.
    The pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV2 novel coronavirus is creating a global crisis. There is a global ambience of uncertainty and anxiety. In addition, nations have imposed strict and restrictive public health measures including lockdowns. In this heightened time of vulnerability, public cooperation to preventive measures depends on trust and confidence in the health system. Trust is the optimistic acceptance of the vulnerability in the belief that the health system has best intentions. On the other hand, confidence is assessed based (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  11.  13
    COVID-19 and Beyond: The Ethical Challenges of Resetting Health Services During and After Public Health Emergencies.Paul Baines, Heather Draper, Anna Chiumento, Sara Fovargue & Lucy Frith - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (11):715-716.
    COVID-19 continues to dominate 2020 and is likely to be a feature of our lives for some time to come. Given this, how should health systems respond ethically to the persistent challenges of responding to the ongoing impact of the pandemic? Relatedly, what ethical values should underpin the resetting of health services after the initial wave, knowing that local spikes and further waves now seem inevitable? In this editorial, we outline some of the ethical challenges confronting those running health (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  12.  39
    COVID-19 as the Underlying Cause of Death: Disentangling Facts and Values.Maria Cristina Amoretti & Elisabetta Lalumera - 2021 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 43 (1):1-4.
    In the ongoing pandemic, death statistics influence people’s feelings and government policy. But when does COVID-19 qualify as the cause of death? As philosophers of medicine interested in conceptual clarification, we address the question by analyzing the World Health Organization’s rules for the certification of death. We show that for COVID-19, WHO rules take into account both facts and values.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  13.  6
    COVID-19 Confinement and Health Risk Behaviors in Spain.Rubén López-Bueno, Joaquín Calatayud, José Casaña, José A. Casajús, Lee Smith, Mark A. Tully, Lars L. Andersen & Guillermo F. López-Sánchez - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    The World Health Organization has declared a world pandemic due to COVID-19. In response, most affected countries have enacted measures involving compulsory confinement and restrictions on free movement, which likely influence citizens' lifestyles. This study investigates changes in health risk behaviors with duration of confinement. An online cross-sectional survey served to collect data about the Spanish adult population regarding health behaviors during the first 3 weeks of confinement. A large sample of participants from all Spanish regions completed the survey. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  14.  28
    COVID-19 and Contact Tracing Apps: Ethical Challenges for a Social Experiment on a Global Scale.Federica Lucivero, Nina Hallowell, Stephanie Johnson, Barbara Prainsack, Gabrielle Samuel & Tamar Sharon - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (4):835-839.
    Mobile applications are increasingly regarded as important tools for an integrated strategy of infection containment in post-lockdown societies around the globe. This paper discusses a number of questions that should be addressed when assessing the ethical challenges of mobile applications for digital contact-tracing of COVID-19: Which safeguards should be designed in the technology? Who should access data? What is a legitimate role for “Big Tech” companies in the development and implementation of these systems? How should cultural and behavioural issues (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  15.  35
    Covid-19 and the Onlineification of Research: Kick-Starting a Dialogue on Responsible Online Research and Innovation (RoRI).R. Braun, Vincent Blok, A. Loeber & U. Wunderle - 2020 - Journal of Responsible Innovation 3 (7):680-688.
    The COVID-19 crisis opened up discussions on using online tools and platforms for academic work, e.g. for research (management) events that were originally designed as face-to-face interactions. As social scientists working in the domain of responsible research and innovation (RRI), we draft this paper to open up a dialogue on Responsible online Research and Innovation (RoRI), and deliberate particular socioethical opportunities and challenges of the onlineification in collaborative theoretical and empirical research. An RRI-inspired ‘going online’ approach would mean, we (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. COVID-19, Gender Inequality, and the Responsibility of the State.Nikki Fortier - 2020 - International Journal of Wellbeing 3 (10):77-93.
    Previous research has shown that women are disproportionately negatively affected by a variety of socio-economic hardships, many of which COVID-19 is making worse. In particular, because of gender roles, and because women’s jobs tend to be given lower priority than men’s (since they are more likely to be part-time, lower-income, and less secure), women assume the obligations of increased caregiving needs at a much higher rate. This unfairly renders women especially susceptible to short- and long-term economic insecurity and decreases (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  44
    The COVID-19 Pandemic: Healthcare Crisis Leadership as Ethics Communication.Matti Häyry - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):42-50.
    Governmental reactions to crises like the COVID-19 pandemic can be seen as ethics communication. Governments can contain the disease and thereby mitigate the detrimental public health impact; allow the virus to spread to reach herd immunity; test, track, isolate, and treat; and suppress the disease regionally. An observation of Sweden and Finland showed a difference in feasible ways to communicate the chosen policy to the citizenry. Sweden assumed the herd immunity strategy and backed it up with health utilitarian arguments. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  18.  15
    COVID-19 is Spatial: Ensuring That Mobile Big Data is Used for Social Good.Tuuli Toivonen, Matthew Zook, Olle Järv & Age Poom - 2020 - Big Data and Society 7 (2).
    The mobility restrictions related to COVID-19 pandemic have resulted in the biggest disruption to individual mobilities in modern times. The crisis is clearly spatial in nature, and examining the geographical aspect is important in understanding the broad implications of the pandemic. The avalanche of mobile Big Data makes it possible to study the spatial effects of the crisis with spatiotemporal detail at the national and global scales. However, the current crisis also highlights serious limitations in the readiness to take (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  19.  22
    Covid-19 and the Accelerating Smart Home.Robyn Dowling & Sophia Maalsen - 2020 - Big Data and Society 7 (2).
    Home, digital technologies and data are intersecting in new ways as responses to the COVID-19 pandemic emerge. We consider the data practices associated with COVID-19 responses and their implications for housing and home through two overarching themes: the notion of home as a private space, and digital technology and surveillance in the home. We show that although home has never been private, the rapid adoption and acceptance of technologies in the home for quarantine, work and study, enabled by (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  20.  15
    COVID-19, Moral Conflict, Distress, and Dying Alone.Lisa K. Anderson-Shaw & Fred A. Zar - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (4):777-782.
    COVID-19 has truly affected most of the world over the past many months, perhaps more than any other event in recent history. In the wake of this pandemic are patients, family members, and various types of care providers, all of whom share different levels of moral distress. Moral conflict occurs in disputes when individuals or groups have differences over, or are unable to translate to each other, deeply held beliefs, knowledge, and values. Such conflicts can seriously affect healthcare providers (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  21. Responding to Covid‐19: How to Navigate a Public Health Emergency Legally and Ethically.Lawrence O. Gostin, Eric A. Friedman & Sarah A. Wetter - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (2):8-12.
  22. Ethical Guidelines for COVID-19 Tracing Apps.Jessica Morley, Josh Cowls, Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi - 2020 - Nature 582:29–⁠31.
    Technologies to rapidly alert people when they have been in contact with someone carrying the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 are part of a strategy to bring the pandemic under control. Currently, at least 47 contact-tracing apps are available globally. They are already in use in Australia, South Korea and Singapore, for instance. And many other governments are testing or considering them. Here we set out 16 questions to assess whether — and to what extent — a contact-tracing app is ethically justifiable.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  23.  3
    A COVID-19 State of Exception and the Bordering of Canada’s Immigration System: Assessing the Uneven Impacts on Refugees, Asylum Seekers and Migrant Workers.Zainab Abu Alrob & John Shields - 2022 - Studies in Social Justice 16 (1):54-77.
    Responses to COVID-19 have been characterized by rapid border closures that have transformed the pandemic from a crisis of health to a crisis of mobility. While Canada was quick to implement border restrictions for non-citizens like refugees and asylum seekers, exemptions were made for some migrant groups like temporary workers. The pandemic marked a departure from who is considered worthy of admission to Canada. In fact, the border through restricted and securitized measures has filtered desirable versus non-desirable migrants, creating (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  20
    Combatting Covid-19. Or, “All Persons Are Equal but Some Persons Are More Equal Than Others”?John Harris - forthcoming - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics:1-9.
    Vaccines, when available, will prove to be crucial in the fight against Covid-19. All societies will face acute dilemmas in allocating scarce lifesaving resources in the form of vaccines for Covid-19. The author proposes The Value of Lives Principle as a just and workable plan for equitable and efficient access. After describing what the principle entails, the author contrasts the advantage of this approach with other current proposals such as the Fair Priority Model.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  25.  24
    The COVID-19 Pandemic: A Month of Bioethics in Finland.Matti Häyry - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):114-122.
    The role of bioethicists amidst crises like the COVID-19 pandemic is not well defined. As professionals in the field, they should respond, but how? The observation of the early days of pandemic confinement in Finland showed that moral philosophers with limited experience in bioethics tended to apply their favorite theories to public decisions, with varying results. Medical ethicists were more likely to lend support to the public authorities by soothing or descriptive accounts of the solutions assumed. These are approaches (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  26.  8
    COVID-19: Another Look at Solidarity.Matti Häyry - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (2):256-262.
    Is there such a thing as corona solidarity? Does voluntary mutual aid solve the problems caused by COVID-19? I argue that the answer to the first question is “yes” and to the second “no.” Not that the answer to the second question could not, in an ideal world, be “yes,” too. It is just that in this world of global capitalism and everybody looking out for themselves, the kind of communal warmth celebrated by the media either does not actually (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  27.  7
    COVID-19 Knowledge, Risk Perception, and Precautionary Behavior Among Nigerians: A Moderated Mediation Approach.Steven K. Iorfa, Iboro F. A. Ottu, Rotimi Oguntayo, Olusola Ayandele, Samson O. Kolawole, Joshua C. Gandi, Abdullahi L. Dangiwa & Peter O. Olapegba - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11:566773.
    The novel coronavirus has not only brought along disruptions to daily socio-economic activities, but sickness and deaths due to its high contagion. With no widely acceptable pharmaceutical cure, the best form of prevention may be precautionary measures which will guide against infections and curb the spread of the disease. This study explored the relationship between COVID-19 knowledge, risk perception, and precautionary behavior among Nigerians. The study also sought to determine whether this relationship differed for men and women. A web-based (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  28.  3
    COVID-19 Place Confinement, Pro-Social, Pro-Environmental Behaviors, and Residents’ Wellbeing: A New Conceptual Framework.Haywantee Ramkissoon - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  29.  14
    COVID-19: Africa’s Relation with Epidemics and Some Imperative Ethics Considerations of the Moment.Godfrey B. Tangwa & Nchangwi Syntia Munung - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (3-4):1-11.
    COVID-19 is a very complex pandemic. It has affected individuals, different countries and regions of the world equally in some senses and differently in other senses. While sub-Saharan Africa has weathered a range of outbreaks of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, the manner in which the COVID-19 pandemic has evolved necessitates some observations, remarks and conclusions from our own situated observation point. Compared to previous epidemics/pandemics, many African countries have displayed a sense of solidarity in the face of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30. COVID-19–Related Trajectories of Psychological Health of Acute Care Healthcare Professionals: A 12-Month Longitudinal Observational Study. [REVIEW]Sandra Abegglen, Robert Greif, Alexander Fuchs & Joana Berger-Estilita - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    The COVID-19 pandemic hit healthcare professionals hard, potentially leading to mental health deterioration. This longitudinal study investigated the 1-year evolution of psychological health of acute care HCPs during the COVID-19 pandemic and explored possible differences between high and low resilient HCPs. From April 2020 to April 2021, a convenience sample of 520 multinational HCPs completed an online survey every 3 months, up to five times. We used mixed linear models to examine the association between resilience and the variation (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  65
    Trolleys, Triage and Covid-19: The Role of Psychological Realism in Sacrificial Dilemmas.Markus Kneer & Ivar R. Hannikainen - 2022 - Cognition and Emotion 36 (1):137-153.
    At the height of the Covid-19 pandemic, frontline medical professionals at intensive care units around the world faced gruesome decisions about how to ration life-saving medical resources. These events provided a unique lens through which to understand how the public reasons about real-world dilemmas involving trade-offs between human lives. In three studies (total N = 2298), we examined people’s moral attitudes toward the triage of acute coronavirus patients, and found elevated support for utilitarian triage policies. These utilitarian tendencies did (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32. Carbon Pricing and COVID-19.Kian Mintz-Woo, Francis Dennig, Hongxun Liu & Thomas Schinko - 2021 - Climate Policy 21 (10):1272-1280.
    A question arising from the COVID-19 crisis is whether the merits of cases for climate policies have been affected. This article focuses on carbon pricing, in the form of either carbon taxes or emissions trading. It discusses the extent to which relative costs and benefits of introducing carbon pricing may have changed in the context of COVID-19, during both the crisis and the recovery period to follow. In several ways, the case for introducing a carbon price is stronger (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  33. Post-COVID-19: Education and Thai Society in Digital Era.Pattamawadee Sankheangaew - unknown
    The article entitled “Post-COVID-19: Education and Thai Society in Digital Era” has two objectives: 1) to study digital technology 2) to study the living life in Thailand in the digital era after COVID-19 pandemics. According to the study, it was found that the new digitized service is a service process on digital platforms such as ordering food, hailing a taxi, and online trading. It is a service called via smartphone. The information is used digitally. Public relations, digital marketing, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  7
    COVID-19 and Biomedical Experts: When Epistemic Authority is (Probably) Not Enough.Pietro Pietrini, Andrea Lavazza & Mirko Farina - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (1):135-142.
    This critical essay evaluates the potential integration of distinct kinds of expertise in policymaking, especially during situations of critical emergencies, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. This article relies on two case studies: herd immunity and restricted access to ventilators for disabled people. These case studies are discussed as examples of experts’ recommendations that have not been widely accepted, though they were made within the boundaries of expert epistemic authority. While the fundamental contribution of biomedical experts in devising public health (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  35.  2
    COVID-19 Related Knowledge and Mental Health: Case of Croatia.Marko Galić, Luka Mustapić, Ana Šimunić, Leon Sić & Sabrina Cipolletta - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Background and Aims: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to radical and unexpected changes in everyday life, and it is plausible that people’s psychophysical health has been affected. This study examined the relationship between COVID-19 related knowledge and mental health in a Croatian sample of participants.MethodsAn online survey was conducted from March 18 until March 23, 2020, and a total of 1244 participant responses were collected. Measures included eight questions regarding biological features of the virus, symptoms, and prevention, the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36.  32
    COVID-19 Vaccination and the Right to Take Risks.Pei-hua Huang - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics (8):534-537.
    The rare but severe cerebral venous thrombosis occurring in some AstraZeneca vaccine recipients has prompted some governments to suspend part of their COVID-19 vaccination programmes. Such suspensions have faced various challenges from both scientific and ethical angles. Most of the criticisms against such suspensions follow a consequentialist approach, arguing that the suspension will lead to more harm than benefits. In this paper, I propose a rights-based argument against the suspension of the vaccine rollouts amid this highly time-sensitive combat of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  22
    COVID-19 and Compulsory Vaccination: An Acceptable Form of Coercion?James E. Hurford - 2021 - The New Bioethics 28 (1):4-26.
    The paper considers whether the British Government could make receiving a COVID-19 vaccine effectively legally mandatory. After considering the position in English law, it considers the ethical pos...
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  8
    Covid 19, Disability, and the Ethics of Distributing Scarce Resources.James B. Gould - 2020 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 26 (1):38-68.
    The Covid-19 pandemic provides a real-world context for evaluating the fairness of disability-based rationing of scarce medical resources. I discuss three situations clinicians may face: rationing based on disability itself; rationing based on inevitable disability-related comorbidities; and rationing based on preventable disability-related comorbidities. I defend three conclusions. First, in a just distribution, extraneous factors do not influence a person’s share. This rules out rationing based on disability alone, where no comorbidities decrease a person’s capacity to benefit from treatment. Second, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39.  6
    COVID-19 Shows the Need to Make Church More Flexible.Jerry Pillay - 2020 - Transformation: An International Journal of Holistic Mission Studies 37 (4):266-275.
    The COVID-19 challenge is unprecedented. It has caused enormous trauma, disrupted economies, social life, mass transportation, work and employment, supply chains, leisure, sport, international relations, academic programmes; literally everything. Churches and religious communities have not been spared; they have been severely affected and, in all likelihood, permanently transformed by the pandemic. The pre-COVID-19 world is gone, replaced by a ‘new normal’. The new landscape calls for both resilience and adaptation, embracing new ways of doing things and of being (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40.  27
    The COVID-19 Pandemic: New Concerns and Connections Between eHealth and Digital Inequalities.Aneka Khilnani, Jeremy Schulz & Laura Robinson - 2020 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 18 (3):393-403.
    Purpose Telemedicine has been advancing for decades and is more indispensable than ever in this unprecedented time of the COVID-19 pandemic. As shown, eHealth appears to be effective for routine management of chronic conditions that require extensive and repeated interactions with healthcare professionals, as well as the monitoring of symptoms and diagnostics. Yet much needs to be done to alleviate digital inequalities that stand in the way of making the benefits of eHealth accessible to all. The purpose of this (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  41.  13
    Voluntary COVID-19 Vaccination of Children: A Social Responsibility.Margherita Brusa & Yechiel Michael Barilan - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (8):543-546.
    Nearly 400 million adults have been vaccinated against COVID-19. Children have been excluded from the vaccination programmes owing to their lower vulnerability to COVID-19 and to the special protections that apply to children’s exposure to new biological products. WHO guidelines and national laws focus on medical safety in the process of vaccine approval, and on national security in the process of emergency authorisation. Because children suffer much from social distancing, it is argued that the harms from containment measures (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42.  35
    Freedom, Security, and the COVID-19 Pandemic.Josette Anna Maria Daemen - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-21.
    Freedom and security are often portrayed as things that have to be traded off against one another, but this view does not capture the full complexity of the freedom-security relationship. Rather, there seem to be four different ways in which freedom and security connect to each other: freedom can come at the cost of security, security can come at the cost of freedom, freedom can work to the benefit of security, and security can work to the benefit of freedom. This (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  48
    COVID – 19: A Critical Ontology of the Present1.Moulay Driss El Maarouf, Taieb Belghazi & Farouk El Maarouf - 2020 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 53 (1):71-89.
    COVID-19 has crowned1 a number of other disasters, causing panic to click into place and horror to becom...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  82
    COVID-19 and Justice.John McMillan - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (10):639-640.
    John Rawls begins a Theory of Justice with the observation that 'Justice is the first virtue of social institutions, as truth is of systems of thought… Each person possesses an inviolability founded on justice that even the welfare of society as a whole cannot override'1. The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in lock-downs, the restriction of liberties, debate about the right to refuse medical treatment and many other changes to the everyday behaviour of persons. The justice issues it raises are (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  12
    Covid-19 and Feminism in the Global South: Challenges, Initiatives and Dilemmas.Nadje Al-Ali - 2020 - European Journal of Women's Studies 27 (4):333-347.
    The article addresses the gendered implications of Covid-19 in the Global South by paying attention to the intersectional pre-existing inequalities that have given rise to specific risks and vulnerabilities. It explores various aspects of the pandemic-induced ‘crisis of social reproduction’ that affects women as the main caregivers as well as addressing the drastic increase of various forms of gender-based violence. Both, in addition to growing poverty and severely limited access to resources and health services, are particularly devastating in marginalized (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  46. COVID-19 and Healthcare Professionals: The Principle of the Common Good.Randy A. Tudy - 2020 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 30 (4):170-174.
    COVID-19 pandemic has claimed thousands of lives around the world. Among the casualties are doctors, nurses, and other health care professionals. Those who defy the danger of death and continue to render their services have to deal with psychological and mental stress due to the lack of protective measures and equipment, the overwhelming number of patients, and the experience of discrimination. In fact, some left their job. In this paper, I will argue that the motivation of health care professionals (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47.  31
    The COVID-19 pandemic: a case for epistemic pluralism in public health policy.Simon Lohse & Karim Bschir - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (4):1-5.
    This paper uses the example of the COVID-19 pandemic to analyse the danger associated with insufficient epistemic pluralism in evidence-based public health policy. Drawing on certain elements in Paul Feyerabend’s political philosophy of science, it discusses reasons for implementing more pluralism as well as challenges to be tackled on the way forward.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  48.  17
    COVID-19 Pandemic, the Scarcity of Medical Resources, Community-Centred Medicine and Discrimination Against Persons with Disabilities.Nicola Panocchia, Viola D'ambrosio, Serafino Corti, Eluisa Lo Presti, Marco Bertelli, Maria Luisa Scattoni & Filippo Ghelma - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (6):362-366.
    This research aims to examine access to medical treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic for people living with disabilities. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the practical and ethical problems of allocating limited medical resources such as intensive care unit beds and ventilators became critical. Although different countries have proposed different guidelines to manage this emergency, these proposed criteria do not sufficiently consider people living with disabilities. People living with disabilities are therefore at a higher risk of exclusion from medical treatments (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  49.  99
    COVID-19 Vaccine Boosters for All Adults: An Optimal U.S. Approach?Ameet Sarpatwari, Ankur Pandya, Emily P. Hyle & Govind Persad - 2022 - Annals of Internal Medicine 175 (2):280–282.
    By 20 October 2021, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had amended its Emergency Use Authorizations for immunocompetent adults who previously received the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. For the 2-dose Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines, the FDA permitted a single booster dose for adults aged 65 years or older and adults aged 18 to 64 years at high-risk for severe COVID-19 or at high risk for occupational or institutional COVID-19 exposure. For the single-dose (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  20
    COVID-19 Heralds a New Epistemology of Science for the Public Good.Manfred D. Laubichler, Peter Schlosser, Jürgen Renn, Federica Russo, Gerald Steiner, Eva Schernhammer, Carlo Jaeger & Guido Caniglia - 2021 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 43 (2):1-6.
    COVID-19 has revealed that science needs to learn how to better deal with the irreducible uncertainty that comes with global systemic risks as well as with the social responsibility of science towards the public good. Further developing the epistemological principles of new theories and experimental practices, alternative investigative pathways and communication, and diverse voices can be an important contribution of history and philosophy of science and of science studies to ongoing transformations of the scientific enterprise.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000