Results for 'Cameron Waldman'

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  1.  14
    Models of Consent to Return of Incidental Findings in Genomic Research.Paul S. Appelbaum, Erik Parens, Cameron R. Waldman, Robert Klitzman, Abby Fyer, Josue Martinez, W. Nicholson Price & Wendy K. Chung - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (4):22-32.
    Genomic research—including whole genome sequencing and whole exome sequencing—has a growing presence in contemporary biomedical investigation. The capacity of sequencing techniques to generate results that go beyond the primary aims of the research—historically referred to as “incidental findings”—has generated considerable discussion as to how this information should be handled—that is, whether incidental results should be returned, and if so, which ones.Federal regulations governing most human subjects research in the United States require the disclosure of “the procedures to be followed” in (...)
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  2.  7
    The Authors Reply.Paul S. Appelbaum, Wendy Chung, Abby J. Fyer, Robert L. Klitzman, Josue Martinez, Erik Parens, W. Nicholson Price & Cameron Waldman - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (1):4-4.
    Reply to a commentary by Felicitas Holzer and Ignacio Mastroleoon “Models of Consent to Return of Incidental Findings in Genomic Research.”.
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  3. Support for Full Disclosure Up Front.Felicitas Holzer & Ignacio Mastroleo - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (1):3-3.
    A commentary on “Models of Consent to Return of Incidental Findings in Genomic Research,” by Paul S. Appelbaum, Erik Parens, Cameron R. Waldman, Robert Klitzman, Abby Fyer, Josue Martinez, W. Nicholson Price II, and Wendy K. Chung, in the July‐August 2014 issue.
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  4.  11
    Governing algorithmic decisions: The role of decision importance and governance on perceived legitimacy of algorithmic decisions.Kirsten Martin & Ari Waldman - 2022 - Big Data and Society 9 (1).
    The algorithmic accountability literature to date has primarily focused on procedural tools to govern automated decision-making systems. That prescriptive literature elides a fundamentally empirical question: whether and under what circumstances, if any, is the use of algorithmic systems to make public policy decisions perceived as legitimate? The present study begins to answer this question. Using factorial vignette survey methodology, we explore the relative importance of the type of decision, the procedural governance, the input data used, and outcome errors on perceptions (...)
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  5.  19
    Conflict monitoring and cognitive control.Matthew M. Botvinick, Todd S. Braver, Deanna M. Barch, Cameron S. Carter & Jonathan D. Cohen - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (3):624-652.
  6.  5
    Power, approach, and inhibition.Dacher Keltner, Deborah H. Gruenfeld & Cameron Anderson - 2003 - Psychological Review 110 (2):265-284.
  7.  7
    Resting heart rate variability predicts self-reported difficulties in emotion regulation: a focus on different facets of emotion regulation.DeWayne P. Williams, Claudia Cash, Cameron Rankin, Anthony Bernardi, Julian Koenig & Julian F. Thayer - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  8.  26
    Free Will, Causality, and Neuroscience.Bernard Feltz, Marcus Missal & Andrew Cameron Sims (eds.) - 2019 - Leiden: Brill.
    This book aims to show that recent developments in neuroscience permit a defense of free will. Through language, human beings can escape strict biological determinism.
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  9.  5
    Discrimination and well-being amongst the homeless: the role of multiple group membership.Melissa Johnstone, Jolanda Jetten, Genevieve A. Dingle, Cameron Parsell & Zoe C. Walter - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  10.  11
    The Flight from God.Homo Viator: Introduction to a Metaphysic of Hope.James Collins, Max Picard, Gabriel Marcel, J. M. Cameron, M. Kuschnitzky & Emma Craufurd - 1953 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 13 (3):417.
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  11.  7
    The Florence Nightingale Effect: Organizational Identification Explains the Peculiar Link Between Others’ Suffering and Workplace Functioning in the Homelessness Sector.Laura J. Ferris, Jolanda Jetten, Melissa Johnstone, Elise Girdham, Cameron Parsell & Zoe C. Walter - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  12.  6
    What Picture Descriptions Can Reveal about Disordered Communication and the Brain.Oishi Kumiko, Agis Daniel, Oishi Kenichi, Posner Joey, Davis Cameron, Kim Eun, Sebastian Rajani, Tippett Donna & Hillis Argye - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  13.  10
    Neural correlates of longitudinal recovery of naming in stroke.Sebastian Rajani, Long Charltien, Purcell Jeremy, Race David, Davis Cameron, Posner Joseph & Hillis Argye - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  14.  12
    Talk Ain’t Cheap: Political CSR and the Challenges of Corporate Deliberation.Cameron Sabadoz & Abraham Singer - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (2):183-211.
    ABSTRACT:Deliberative democratic theory, commonly used to explore questions of “political” corporate social responsibility, has become prominent in the literature. This theory has been challenged previously for being overly sanguine about firm profit imperatives, but left unexamined is whether corporate contexts are appropriate contexts for deliberative theory in the first place. We explore this question using the case of Starbucks’ “Race Together” campaign to show that significant challenges exist to corporate deliberation, even in cases featuring genuinely committed firms. We return to (...)
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  15.  5
    Human Freedom after Darwin: A Critical Rationalist View (review).Theodore Waldman - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (1):136-137.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Journal of the History of Philosophy 41.1 (2003) 136-137 [Access article in PDF] John Watkins. Human Freedom after Darwin: A Critical Rationalist View. Chicago: Open Court Publishing, 1999. Pp. xi + 348. Cloth, $49.95. Paper, $24.95. John Watkins examines man's place in nature since Darwin. As a critical rationalist, using the methods of science, Watkins hopes to construct a world-view which challenges competing hypotheses and supports his own. He (...)
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  16.  5
    Abismo de rosas: uma metáfora vertiginosa?Berta Waldman - 1976 - Discurso 7 (7):239-244.
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  17.  4
    Epistemic Coherence.Paul Thagard, Chris Eliasmith, Paul Rusnock & Cameron Shelley - 2002 - In R. Elio (ed.), Common sense, reasoning, and rationality. Vancouver Studies in Cognitive Science (Vol. 11). Oxford University Press. pp. 104-131.
    Many contemporary philosophers favor coherence theories of knowledge (Bender 1989, BonJour 1985, Davidson 1986, Harman 1986, Lehrer 1990). But the nature of coherence is usually left vague, with no method provided for determining whether a belief should be accepted or rejected on the basis of its coherence or incoherence with other beliefs. Haack's (1993) explication of coherence relies largely on an analogy between epistemic justification and crossword puzzles. We show in this paper how epistemic coherence can be understood in terms (...)
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  18.  6
    Preparedness in cultural learning.Cameron Rouse Turner & Lachlan Douglas Walmsley - 2020 - Synthese 199 (1-2):81-100.
    It is clear throughout Cognitive Gadgets Heyes believes the development of cognitive capacities results from the interaction of genes and experience. However, she opposes cognitive instincts theorists to her own view that uniquely human capacities are cognitive gadgets. Instinct theorists believe that cognitive capacities are substantially produced by selection, with the environment playing a triggering role. Heyes’s position is that humans have similar general learning capacities to those present across taxa, and that sophisticated human cognition is substantially created by our (...)
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  19.  6
    Origins of the Legal Doctrine of Reasonable Doubt.Theodore Waldman - 1959 - Journal of the History of Ideas 20 (1/4):299.
  20.  9
    High court should not restrict access to puberty blockers for minors.Cameron Beattie - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (1):71-76.
    Gender dysphoria is a clinically significant incongruence between expressed gender and assigned gender, with rapidly growing prevalence among children. The UK High Court recently conducted a judicial review regarding the service provision at a youth-focussed gender identity clinic in Tavistock. The high court adjudged it ‘highly unlikely’ that under-13s, and ‘doubtful’ that 14–15 years old, can be competent to consent to puberty blocker therapy for GD. They based their reasoning on the limited evidence regarding efficacy, the likelihood of progressing to (...)
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  21.  42
    The Moving Spotlight: An Essay on Time and Ontology.Ross P. Cameron - 2015 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    Ross P. Cameron argues that the flow of time is a genuine feature of reality. He suggests that the best version of the A-Theory is a version of the Moving Spotlight view, according to which past and future beings are real, but there is nonetheless an objectively privileged present. Cameron argues that the Moving Spotlight theory should be viewed as having more in common with Presentism than with the B-Theory. Furthermore, it provides the best account of truthmakers for (...)
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  22.  10
    Multiple Analogies in Science and Philosophy.Cameron Shelley - 2003 - John Benjamins Publishing.
    A multiple analogy is a structured comparison in which several sources are likened to a target. In "Multiple analogies in science and philosophy," Shelley provides a thorough account of the cognitive representations and processes that participate in multiple analogy formation. Through analysis of real examples taken from the fields of evolutionary biology, archaeology, and Plato's "Republic," Shelley argues that multiple analogies are not simply concatenated single analogies but are instead the general form of analogical inference, of which single analogies are (...)
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  23.  19
    Are Algorithmic Decisions Legitimate? The Effect of Process and Outcomes on Perceptions of Legitimacy of AI Decisions.Kirsten Martin & Ari Waldman - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 183 (3):653-670.
    Firms use algorithms to make important business decisions. To date, the algorithmic accountability literature has elided a fundamentally empirical question important to business ethics and management: Under what circumstances, if any, are algorithmic decision-making systems considered legitimate? The present study begins to answer this question. Using factorial vignette survey methodology, we explore the impact of decision importance, governance, outcomes, and data inputs on perceptions of the legitimacy of algorithmic decisions made by firms. We find that many of the procedural governance (...)
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  24.  26
    Kinship intensity and the use of mental states in moral judgment across societies.Cameron M. Curtin, H. Clark Barrett, Alexander Bolyanatz, Alyssa N. Crittenden, Daniel Fessler, Simon Fitzpatrick, Michael Gurven, Martin Kanovsky, Stephen Laurence, Anne Pisor, Brooke Scelza, Stephen Stich, Chris von Rueden & Joseph Henrich - 2020 - Evolution and Human Behavior 41 (5):415-429.
    Decades of research conducted in Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, & Democratic (WEIRD) societies have led many scholars to conclude that the use of mental states in moral judgment is a human cognitive universal, perhaps an adaptive strategy for selecting optimal social partners from a large pool of candidates. However, recent work from a more diverse array of societies suggests there may be important variation in how much people rely on mental states, with people in some societies judging accidental harms just (...)
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  25. Deep learning: A philosophical introduction.Cameron Buckner - 2019 - Philosophy Compass 14 (10):e12625.
    Deep learning is currently the most prominent and widely successful method in artificial intelligence. Despite having played an active role in earlier artificial intelligence and neural network research, philosophers have been largely silent on this technology so far. This is remarkable, given that deep learning neural networks have blown past predicted upper limits on artificial intelligence performance—recognizing complex objects in natural photographs and defeating world champions in strategy games as complex as Go and chess—yet there remains no universally accepted explanation (...)
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  26.  28
    God exists at every world: response to Sheehy: ROSS P. CAMERON.Ross P. Cameron - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (1):95-100.
    Paul Sheehy has argued that the modal realist cannot satisfactorily allow for the necessity of God's existence. In this short paper I show that she can, and that Sheehy only sees a problem because he has failed to appreciate all the resources available to the modal realist. God may be an abstract existent outside spacetime or He may not be: but either way, there is no problem for the modal realist to admit that He exists at every concrete possible world.
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  27. There is a distinctively epistemic kind of blame.Cameron Boult - 2020 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 103 (3):518-534.
    Is there a distinctively epistemic kind of blame? It has become commonplace for epistemologists to talk about epistemic blame, and to rely on this notion for theoretical purposes. But not everyone is convinced. Some of the most compelling reasons for skepticism about epistemic blame focus on disanologies, or asymmetries, between the moral and epistemic domains. In this paper, I defend the idea that there is a distinctively epistemic kind of blame. I do so primarily by developing an account of the (...)
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  28. Empiricism without Magic: Transformational Abstraction in Deep Convolutional Neural Networks.Cameron Buckner - 2018 - Synthese (12):1-34.
    In artificial intelligence, recent research has demonstrated the remarkable potential of Deep Convolutional Neural Networks (DCNNs), which seem to exceed state-of-the-art performance in new domains weekly, especially on the sorts of very difficult perceptual discrimination tasks that skeptics thought would remain beyond the reach of artificial intelligence. However, it has proven difficult to explain why DCNNs perform so well. In philosophy of mind, empiricists have long suggested that complex cognition is based on information derived from sensory experience, often appealing to (...)
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  29. Epistemic blame.Cameron Boult - 2021 - Philosophy Compass 16 (8):e12762.
    This paper provides a critical overview of recent work on epistemic blame. The paper identifies key features of the concept of epistemic blame and discusses two ways of motivating the importance of this concept. Four different approaches to the nature of epistemic blame are examined. Central issues surrounding the ethics and value of epistemic blame are identified and briefly explored. In addition to providing an overview of the state of the art of this growing but controversial field, the paper highlights (...)
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  30.  7
    The Analogy Theory of Disanalogy: When Conclusions Collide.Cameron Shelley - 2002 - Metaphor and Symbol 17 (2):81-97.
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  31.  14
    Solipsism and the Self in Wittgenstein's Tractatus.Cameron Hessell - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):127-154.
    This paper aims to settle the question of what Ludwig Wittgenstein meant by "what solipsism means": This remark provides the key to the problem, how much truth there is in solipsism. For what solipsism means is quite correct; only it cannot be said, but makes itself manifest. The world is my world: this is manifest in the fact that the limits of language mean the limits of my world. 1 Throughout this paper, I will paraphrase "what solipsism means" simply as (...)
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  32.  14
    Commentary.Ric Waldman - 1995 - Business Ethics: The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility 9 (2):8-8.
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  33.  7
    Ethics, Changing Populations, and the Dental Profession.H. Barry Waldman, Marc Bernard Ackerman & Steven P. Perlman - 2015 - Ethics and Behavior 25 (3):271-278.
    This review emphasizes the worldwide and U.S. evolving population demographics and the need for the dental profession to exercise its professional and ethical duty to expand its traditional patient base to provide needed services.
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  34.  26
    A Defense of Hume's Dictum.Cameron Gibbs - 2019 - Dissertation, University of Massachusetts Amherst
    Is the world internally connected by a web of necessary connections or is everything loose and independent? Followers of David Hume accept the latter by upholding Hume’s Dictum, according to which there are no necessary connections between distinct existences. Roughly put, anything can coexist with anything else, and anything can fail to coexist with anything else. Hume put it like this: “There is no object which implies the existence of any other if we consider these objects in themselves.” Since Hume’s (...)
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  35. The significance of epistemic blame.Cameron Boult - 2021 - Erkenntnis 88 (2):807-828.
    One challenge in developing an account of the nature of epistemic blame is to explain what differentiates epistemic blame from mere negative epistemic evaluation. The challenge is to explain the difference, without invoking practices or behaviors that seem out of place in the epistemic domain. In this paper, I examine whether the most sophisticated recent account of the nature of epistemic blame—due to Jessica Brown—is up for the challenge. I argue that the account ultimately falls short, but does so in (...)
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  36.  9
    Thoughts on Alternative Designs for Clinical Trials for Ebola Treatment Research.Ronald Waldman & Phillip Nieburg - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (4):38-40.
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  37.  26
    The Relational Foundations of Epistemic Normativity.Cameron Boult - forthcoming - Philosophical Issues.
    Why comply with epistemic norms? In this paper, I argue that complying with epistemic norms, engaging in epistemically responsible conduct, and being epistemically trustworthy are constitutive elements of maintaining good epistemic relations with oneself and others. Good epistemic relations are in turn both instrumentally and finally valuable: they enable the kind of coordination and knowledge acquisition underpinning much of what we tend to associate with a flourishing human life; and just as good interpersonal relations with others can be good for (...)
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  38.  10
    The world is born from zero: understanding speculation and video games.Cameron Kunzelman - 2022 - Boston: De Gruyter Oldenbourg.
    The World is Born From Zero is an investigation into the relationship between video games and science fiction through the philosophy of speculation. Cameron Kunzelman argues that the video game medium is centered on the evaluation and production of possible futures by following video game studies, media philosophy, and science fiction studies to their furthest reaches. Claiming that the best way to understand games is through rigorous formal analysis of their aesthetic strategies and the cultural context those strategies emerge (...)
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  39.  6
    More Publics, More Problems: The Productive Interface between the Pragmatic Sociology of Critique and Deweyan Pragmatism.Cameron Owens, Andy Scerri & Meg Holden - 2013 - Contemporary Pragmatism 10 (2):1-24.
    We consider the prospect of a trans-Atlantic alliance for a social theory of critical pragmatism, seeking the specific value that French critical pragmatism can offer American pragmatists, and vice versa. We proceed through a discussion of the ontological and metho- dological keys to French critical pragmatism: the architecture of justification, the treatment of conflict in public disputes, the dynamics of argumentation, and the play of acts defined analytically as ‘test’ and ‘compromise’. At each level, we compare this approach to Deweyan (...)
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  40.  5
    The United States, Israel and the search for international order: socializing states.Cameron G. Thies - 2013 - New York, New York: Routledge.
    Improving structural theories of international politics -- Socializing states in the international system -- Socializing the United States: emergence to major member -- Socializing the United States: structural imperatives and great power status -- Socializing Israel: emergence to major member.
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  41.  8
    Atlas of the Islamic World since 1500.Marilyn R. Waldman & Francis Robinson - 1987 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 107 (4):802.
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  42.  5
    As partes do jogo.Berta Waldman & Alcir Pécora - 1980 - Discurso 12:99-112.
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  43.  3
    Treatment Innovation in Orthopedic Surgery: A Case Study from Hospital for Special Surgery.Seth A. Waldman, Joseph R. Schottenfeld & Abbe R. Gluck - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (2):238-240.
    Excessive prescribing of pain medications after surgery has contributed to the epidemic of opioid misuse and diversion in the United States. Pain specialists may be particularly well situated to address these issues. We describe an attempt to reverse the trend at an orthopedic surgical hospital by implementing a peri-operative assessment and treatment service which minimizes preoperative opioid use, when necessary implements addiction treatment, and encourages early tapering from opioids.
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  44. Epistemic normativity and the justification-excuse distinction.Cameron Boult - 2017 - Synthese 194 (10):4065-4081.
    The paper critically examines recent work on justifications and excuses in epistemology. I start with a discussion of Gerken’s claim that the “excuse maneuver” is ad hoc. Recent work from Timothy Williamson and Clayton Littlejohn provides resources to advance the debate. Focusing in particular on a key insight in Williamson’s view, I then consider an additional worry for the so-called excuse maneuver. I call it the “excuses are not enough” objection. Dealing with this objection generates pressure in two directions: one (...)
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  45. Standing to epistemically blame.Cameron Boult - 2021 - Synthese 199 (3-4):11355-11375.
    A plausible condition on having the standing to blame someone is that the target of blame's wrongdoing must in some sense be your “business”—the wrong must in some sense harm or affect you, or others close to you. This is known as the business condition on standing to blame. Many cases of epistemic blame discussed in the literature do not obviously involve examples of someone harming or affecting another. As such, not enough has been said about how an individual's epistemic (...)
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  46. Functional kinds: a skeptical look.Cameron Buckner - 2015 - Synthese 192 (12):3915-3942.
    The functionalist approach to kinds has suffered recently due to its association with law-based approaches to induction and explanation. Philosophers of science increasingly view nomological approaches as inappropriate for the special sciences like psychology and biology, which has led to a surge of interest in approaches to natural kinds that are more obviously compatible with mechanistic and model-based methods, especially homeostatic property cluster theory. But can the functionalist approach to kinds be weaned off its dependency on laws? Dan Weiskopf has (...)
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  47.  11
    Systems thinking and ethics in public health: a necessary and mutually beneficial partnership.Cameron D. Norman, Maxwell J. Smith & Diego S. Silva - 2018 - Monash Bioethics Review 36 (1-4):54-67.
    Systems thinking has emerged as a means of conceptualizing and addressing complex public health problems, thereby challenging more commonplace understanding of problems and corresponding solutions as straightforward explanations of cause and effect. Systems thinking tries to address the complexity of problems through qualitative and quantitative modeling based on a variety of systems theories, each with their own assumptions and, more importantly, implicit and unexamined values. To date, however, there has been little engagement between systems scientists and those working in bioethics (...)
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  48.  25
    “Currents of Hope”: Neurostimulation Techniques in U.S. and U.K. Print Media.Eric Racine, Sarah Waldman, Nicole Palmour, David Risse & Judy Illes - 2007 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (3):312-316.
    The application of neurostimulation techniques such as deep brain stimulation —often called a brain pacemaker for neurological conditions like Parkinson's disease —has generated “currents of hope.” Building on this hope, there is significant interest in applying neurostimulation to psychiatric disorders such as major depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. These emerging neurosurgical practices raise a number of important ethical and social questions in matters of resource allocation, informed consent for vulnerable populations, and commercialization of research.
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  49. Some Combinatorics of Imperfect Information.Peter Cameron & Wilfrid Hodges - 2001 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 66 (2):673-684.
     
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  50.  45
    Black Boxes or Unflattering Mirrors? Comparative Bias in the Science of Machine Behaviour.Cameron Buckner - 2023 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 74 (3):681-712.
    The last 5 years have seen a series of remarkable achievements in deep-neural-network-based artificial intelligence research, and some modellers have argued that their performance compares favourably to human cognition. Critics, however, have argued that processing in deep neural networks is unlike human cognition for four reasons: they are (i) data-hungry, (ii) brittle, and (iii) inscrutable black boxes that merely (iv) reward-hack rather than learn real solutions to problems. This article rebuts these criticisms by exposing comparative bias within them, in the (...)
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