Results for 'Can M. Alpaslan'

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  1.  50
    A Meta-Analytic Review of Ethical Leadership Outcomes and Moderators.Akanksha Bedi, Can M. Alpaslan & Sandy Green - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 139 (3):517-536.
    A growing body of research suggests that follower perceptions of ethical leadership are associated with beneficial follower outcomes. However, some empirical researchers have found contradictory results. In this study, we use social learning and social exchange theories to test the relationship between ethical leadership and follower work outcomes. Our results suggest that ethical leadership is related positively to numerous follower outcomes such as perceptions of leader interactional fairness and follower ethical behavior. Furthermore, we explore how ethical leadership relates to and (...)
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  2.  29
    Entanglement of a Single Spin-1 Object: An Example of Ubiquitous Entanglement. [REVIEW]Sinem Binicioǧlu, M. Ali Can, Alexander A. Klyachko & Alexander S. Shumovsky - 2007 - Foundations of Physics 37 (8):1253-1277.
    Using a single spin-1 object as an example, we discuss a recent approach to quantum entanglement. [A.A. Klyachko and A.S. Shumovsky, J. Phys: Conf. Series 36, 87 (2006), E-print quant-ph/0512213]. The key idea of the approach consists in presetting of basic observables in the very definition of quantum system. Specification of basic observables defines the dynamic symmetry of the system. Entangled states of the system are then interpreted as states with maximal amount of uncertainty of all basic observables. The approach (...)
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  3. Ought-Implies-Can: Erasmus Luther and R.M. Hare.Charles R. Pigden - 1990 - Sophia 29 (1):2-30.
    l. There is an antinomy in Hare's thought between Ought-Implies-Can and No-Indicatives-from-Imperatives. It cannot be resolved by drawing a distinction between implication and entailment. 2. Luther resolved this antinomy in the l6th century, but to understand his solution, we need to understand his problem. He thought the necessity of Divine foreknowledge removed contingency from human acts, thus making it impossible for sinners to do otherwise than sin. 3. Erasmus objected (on behalf of Free Will) that this violates Ought-Implies-Can which he (...)
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  4. Using a Rhetorical Framework to Predict Corruption.Can Alpaslan, Sandy Green & Ian Mitroff - 2008 - Electronic Journal of Business Ethics and Organization Studies 13 (2):5-11.
    The field of rhetoric provides unique frameworks and tools for understanding the role of language in moral reasoning and corruption. Drawing on a discursive understanding of the self, we focus on how the rhetoric of conversations constructs and shapes our moral reasoning and moral behavior. Using rhetorical appeals and a moral development framework, we construct three propositions that use variation in the rhetoric of conversations to identify and predict corruption. We discuss some of the implications of our model.
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  5.  39
    Can Democracy Promote the General Welfare?: JAMES M. BUCHANAN.James M. Buchanan - 1997 - Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (2):165-179.
    To commence any answer to the question “Can democracy promote the general welfare?” requires attention to the meaning of “general welfare.” If this term is drained of all significance by being defined as “whatever the political decision process determines it to be,” then there is no content to the question. The meaning of the term can be restored only by classifying possible outcomes of democratic political processes into two sets – those that are general in application over all citizens and (...)
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  6.  35
    Can Whether One Proposition Makes Sense Depend on the Truth of Another? : R.M. White.R. M. White - 1973 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 7:14-29.
    Wittgenstein's Tractatus contains a wide range of profound insights into the nature of logic and language – insights which will survive the particular theories of the Tractatus and seem to me to mark definitive and unassailable landmarks in our understanding of some of the deepest questions of philosophy. And yet alongside these insights there is a theory of the nature of the relation between language and reality which appears both to be impossible to work out in detail in a way (...)
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  7.  98
    Can Broad Consent Be Informed Consent?M. Sheehan - 2011 - Public Health Ethics 4 (3):226-235.
    In biobanks, a broader model of consent is often used and justified by a range of different strategies that make reference to the potential benefits brought by the research it will facilitate combined with the low level of risk involved (provided adequate measures are in place to protect privacy and confidentiality) or a questioning of the centrality of the notion of informed consent. Against this, it has been suggested that the lack of specific information about particular uses of the samples (...)
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  8.  13
    Can a Form of Life Be Wrong?: Lawrence M. Hinman.Lawrence M. Hinman - 1983 - Philosophy 58 (225):339-351.
    In recent years, a particular doctrine about forms of life has come to be associated with Wittgenstein's name by followers and critics of his philosophy alike. It is not a doctrine which Wittgenstein espoused or even, given his understanding of philosophy, one which he could have accepted; nor is it worthy of acceptance on its own merits. I shall here outline the standard interpretation of Wittgenstein's remarks on forms of life, consider the textual basis for such a reading of Wittgenstein, (...)
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  9.  49
    Can a Machine Think ? Automation Beyond Simulation.M. Beatrice Fazi - 2019 - AI and Society 34 (4):813-824.
    This article will rework the classical question ‘Can a machine think?’ into a more specific problem: ‘Can a machine think anything new?’ It will consider traditional computational tasks such as prediction and decision-making, so as to investigate whether the instrumentality of these operations can be understood in terms of the creation of novel thought. By addressing philosophical and technoscientific attempts to mechanise thought on the one hand, and the philosophical and cultural critique of these attempts on the other, I will (...)
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  10. I Can’T Believe I’M Stupid.Andy Egan & Adam Elga - 2005 - Philosophical Perspectives 19 (1):77–93.
    It is bad news to find out that one's cognitive or perceptual faculties are defective. Furthermore, it’s not always transparent how one ought to revise one's beliefs in light of such news. Two sorts of news should be distinguished. On the one hand, there is news that a faculty is unreliable -- that it doesn't track the truth particularly well. On the other hand, there is news that a faculty is anti-reliable -- that it tends to go positively wrong. These (...)
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  11.  16
    Can a Machine Think ? Automation Beyond Simulation.M. Beatrice Fazi - 2019 - AI and Society 34 (4):813-824.
    This article will rework the classical question ‘Can a machine think?’ into a more specific problem: ‘Can a machine think anything new?’ It will consider traditional computational tasks such as prediction and decision-making, so as to investigate whether the instrumentality of these operations can be understood in terms of the creation of novel thought. By addressing philosophical and technoscientific attempts to mechanise thought on the one hand, and the philosophical and cultural critique of these attempts on the other, I will (...)
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  12. What Can Cybernetics Learn From Design?C. M. Herr - 2016 - Constructivist Foundations 11 (3):583-585.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Design Research as a Variety of Second-Order Cybernetic Practice” by Ben Sweeting. Upshot: Based on Sweeting’s central question of what design can bring to cybernetics, this commentary extends and adds further depth to the target article. Aspects discussed include the nature of practice in relation to design, the introduction of designerly ways of acting and thinking through acting to cybernetics, and the re-introduction of material experimentation typical of early cybernetics.
     
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  13. Can Quantum Probability Provide a New Direction for Cognitive Modeling?Emmanuel M. Pothos & Jerome R. Busemeyer - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (3):255-274.
    Classical (Bayesian) probability (CP) theory has led to an influential research tradition for modeling cognitive processes. Cognitive scientists have been trained to work with CP principles for so long that it is hard even to imagine alternative ways to formalize probabilities. However, in physics, quantum probability (QP) theory has been the dominant probabilistic approach for nearly 100 years. Could QP theory provide us with any advantages in cognitive modeling as well? Note first that both CP and QP theory share the (...)
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  14. Can Automatic Calculating Machines Be Said to Think?M. H. A. Newman, Alan M. Turing, Geoffrey Jefferson, R. B. Braithwaite & S. Shieber - 2004 - In Stuart M. Shieber (ed.), The Turing Test: Verbal Behavior as the Hallmark of Intelligence. MIT Press.
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  15. How Far Can Sensorimotor Direct Realism Go?M. Mossio - 2016 - Constructivist Foundations 11 (2):287-289.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Sensorimotor Direct Realism: How We Enact Our World” by Michael Beaton. Upshot: The target article convincingly argues in favor of the idea that the sensorimotor account of perception provides a positive scientific context for direct realism. In some cases, however, perception and experience do not seem to fit easily with sensorimotor direct realism. This raises a question of scope that requires further elaboration.
     
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  16. I Ought, Therefore I Can.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 136 (2):167-216.
    I defend the following version of the ought-implies-can principle: (OIC) by virtue of conceptual necessity, an agent at a given time has an (objective, pro tanto) obligation to do only what the agent at that time has the ability and opportunity to do. In short, obligations correspond to ability plus opportunity. My argument has three premises: (1) obligations correspond to reasons for action; (2) reasons for action correspond to potential actions; (3) potential actions correspond to ability plus opportunity. In the (...)
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  17.  6
    “I’m afraid I can’t let you do that, Doctor”: meaningful disagreements with AI in medical contexts.Hendrik Kempt, Jan-Christoph Heilinger & Saskia K. Nagel - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-8.
    This paper explores the role and resolution of disagreements between physicians and their diagnostic AI-based decision support systems. With an ever-growing number of applications for these independently operating diagnostic tools, it becomes less and less clear what a physician ought to do in case their diagnosis is in faultless conflict with the results of the DSS. The consequences of such uncertainty can ultimately lead to effects detrimental to the intended purpose of such machines, e.g. by shifting the burden of proof (...)
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  18.  30
    Can a Latin Trinity Be Social? A Response to Scott M. Williams.William Hasker - 2018 - Faith and Philosophy 35 (3):356-366.
    Scott Williams’s Latin Social model of the Trinity holds that the trinitarian persons have between them a single set of divine mental powers and a single set of divine mental acts. He claims, nevertheless, that on his view the persons are able to use indexical pronouns such as “I.” This claim is examined and is found to be mistaken.
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  19.  24
    Can Quantum Theory and Special Relativity Peacefully Coexist?M. P. Seevinck - unknown
    This white paper aims to identify an open problem in 'Quantum Physics and the Nature of Reality' -namely whether quantum theory and special relativity are formally compatible-, to indicate what the underlying issues are, and put forward ideas about how the problem might be addressed.
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  20. The Reasons We Can Share: An Attack on the Distinction Between Agent-Relative and Agent-Neutral Values.Christine M. Korsgaard - 1993 - Social Philosophy and Policy 10 (1):24-51.
    To later generations, much of the moral philosophy of the twentieth century will look like a struggle to escape from utilitarianism. We seem to succeed in disproving one utilitarian doctrine, only to find ourselves caught in the grip of another. I believe that this is because a basic feature of the consequentialist outlook still pervades and distorts our thinking: the view that the business of morality is to bring something about . Too often, the rest of us have pitched our (...)
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  21. To What Extent Can Second-Order Cybernetics Be a Foundation for Psychology?M. Arnold-Cathalifaud & D. Thumala-Dockendorff - 2016 - Constructivist Foundations 11 (3):520-521.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Cybernetic Foundations for Psychology” by Bernard Scott. Upshot: Scott’s proposal is well-founded and opens interesting possibilities. We selected some critical aspects of his argumentation and discuss them in the context of the constructivist perspective. We highlight as Scott’s “blind spot” his statement - presented without further argument - of the need for a conceptual and theoretical unification of psychology from the perspective of second-order cybernetics. We find this especially worrisome as it is based on (...)
     
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  22.  25
    Can Valid Inferences Be Suppressed?Ruth M. J. Byrne - 1991 - Cognition 39 (1):71-78.
  23.  17
    Reference Without Referents.R. M. Sainsbury (ed.) - 2005 - Oxford, England and New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press UK.
    Reference is a central topic in philosophy of language, and has been the main focus of discussion about how language relates to the world. R. M. Sainsbury sets out a new approach to the concept, which promises to bring to an end some long-standing debates in semantic theory.There is a single category of referring expressions, all of which deserve essentially the same kind of semantic treatment. Included in this category are both singular and plural referring expressions, complex and non-complex referring (...)
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  24.  23
    Can the Ethical Best Practice of Shared Decision-Making Lead to Moral Distress?Trisha M. Prentice & Lynn Gillam - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (2):259-268.
    When healthcare professionals feel constrained from acting in a patient’s best interests, moral distress ensues. The resulting negative sequelae of burnout, poor retention rates, and ultimately poor patient care are well recognized across healthcare providers. Yet an appreciation of how particular disciplines, including physicians, come to be “constrained” in their actions is still lacking. This paper will examine how the application of shared decision-making may contribute to the experience of moral distress for physicians and why such distress may go under-recognized. (...)
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  25. Can a Theory-Laden Observation Test the Theory?A. Franklin, M. Anderson, D. Brock, S. Coleman, J. Downing, A. Gruvander, J. Lilly, J. Neal, D. Peterson, M. Price, R. Rice, L. Smith, S. Speirer & D. Toering - 1989 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 40 (2):229-231.
  26. Can History of Mathematics and Mathematics Education Coexist.M. Fried - 2001 - Science & Education 10 (4):391-408.
  27.  9
    “I’M Not Really 100% a Woman If I Can’T Have a Kid”: Infertility and the Intersection of Gender, Identity, and the Body.Ann V. Bell - 2019 - Gender and Society 33 (4):629-651.
    Despite establishing the gendered construction of infertility, most research on the subject has not examined how individuals with such reproductive difficulty negotiate their own sense of gender. I explore this gap through 58 interviews with women who are medically infertile and involuntarily childless. In studying how women achieve their gender, I reveal the importance of the body to such construction. For the participants, there is not just a motherhood mandate in the United States, but a fertility mandate—women are not just (...)
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  28.  29
    Can Arguments Address Concerns?M. Hayry - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (10):598-600.
    People have concerns, and ethicists often respond to them with philosophical arguments. But can conceptual constructions properly address fears and anxieties? It is argued in this paper that while it is possible to voice, clarify, create and—to a certain extent—tackle concerns by arguments, more concrete practices, choices, and actions are normally needed to produce proper responses to people’s worries. While logical inconsistencies and empirical errors can legitimately be exposed by arguments, the situation is considerably less clear when it comes to (...)
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  29. Can Language Restructure Cognition? The Case for Space.Asifa Majid, Melissa Bowerman, Sotaro Kita, Daniel B. M. Haun & Stephen C. Levinson - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):108-114.
  30. Setting Things Before the Mind: M.G.F. Martin.M. G. F. Martin - 1998 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 43:157-179.
    Listening to someone from some distance in a crowded room you may experience the following phenomenon: when looking at them speak, you may both hear and see where the source of the sounds is; but when your eyes are turned elsewhere, you may no longer be able to detect exactly where the voice must be coming from. With your eyes again fixed on the speaker, and the movement of her lips a clear sense of the source of the sound will (...)
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  31. Can and Can't.A. M. Honoré - 1964 - Mind 73 (292):463-479.
  32.  89
    When a Good Fit Can Be Bad.M. A. Pitt & I. J. Myung - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (10):421-425.
  33. Can I Kill My Younger Self? Time Travel and the Retrosuicide Paradox.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2009 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 90 (4):520-534.
    If time travel is possible, presumably so is my shooting my younger self ; then apparently I can kill him – I can commit retrosuicide. But if I were to kill him I would not exist to shoot him, so how can I kill him? The standard solution to this paradox understands ability as compossibility with the relevant facts and points to an equivocation about which facts are relevant: my killing YS is compossible with his proximity but not with his (...)
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  34.  22
    Can a Darwinian Be a Christian? [REVIEW]Keith M. Parsons - 2001 - Philosophical Inquiry 23 (3-4):156-159.
  35.  46
    Can Chunk Size Differences Explain Developmental Changes in Lexical Learning?Eleonore H. M. Smalle, Louisa Bogaerts, Morgane Simonis, Wouter Duyck, Michael P. A. Page, Martin G. Edwards & Arnaud Szmalec - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  36.  45
    Can Ethics Be Christian?James M. Gustafson - 1975 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    Determines the implications of Christian religious conviction for moral conduct through extensive philosophical inquiry into an incident involving an ethical ...
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  37.  3
    Can’T Hit Pause? On the Constitutive Elements of Responsible Ventilator Management & the Apnea Test.Kevin M. Dirksen & Lilith Judd - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):35-37.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 35-37.
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  38.  42
    R. M. Adams’s Theodicy of Grace.Richard M. Gale - 1998 - Philo 1 (1):36-44.
    R. M. Adams’s essay, “Must God Create the Best?” can be interpreted as offering a theodicy for God’s creating morally less perfect beings than he could have created. By creating these morally less perfect beings, God is bestowing grace upon them, which is an unmerited or undeserved benefit. He does so, however, in advance of the free moral misdeeds that render them undeserving. This requires that God have middle knowledge, pace Adams’s version of the Free Will Theodicy, of what would (...)
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  39. The Moral Magic of Consent: Heidi M. Hurd.Heidi M. Hurd - 1996 - Legal Theory 2 (2):121-146.
    We regularly wield powers that, upon close scrutiny, appear remarkably magical. By sheer exercise of will, we bring into existence things that have never existed before. With but a nod, we effect the disappearance of things that have long served as barriers to the actions of others. And, by mere resolve, we generate things that pose significant obstacles to others' exercise of liberty. What is the nature of these things that we create and destroy by our mere decision to do (...)
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  40.  19
    Can a Latin Trinity Be Social? A Response to Scott M. Williams in Advance.William Hasker - forthcoming - Faith and Philosophy.
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  41.  52
    Can Sex Selection Be Ethically Tolerated?B. M. Dickens - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (6):335-336.
  42.  65
    Can We Learn From Hidden Mistakes? Self-Fulfilling Prophecy and Responsible Neuroprognostic Innovation.Mayli Mertens, Owen C. King, Michel J. A. M. van Putten & Marianne Boenink - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    A self-fulfilling prophecy (SFP) in neuroprognostication occurs when a patient in coma is predicted to have a poor outcome, and life-sustaining treatment is withdrawn on the basis of that prediction, thus directly bringing about a poor outcome (viz. death) for that patient. In contrast to the predominant emphasis in the bioethics literature, we look beyond the moral issues raised by the possibility that an erroneous prediction might lead to the death of a patient who otherwise would have lived. Instead, we (...)
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  43.  3
    Talking Can Be Harmful Depending on What You Say.Cynthia M. A. Geppert & Toby Schonfeld - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (12):42-44.
    McCarthy, Homan, and Rozier’s presentation of theological anthropology and its contribution to secular bioethics suffers from three primary limitations. First, the article re...
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  44.  37
    There Can Be No Turing-Test-Passing Memorizing Machines.Stuart M. Shieber - 2014 - Philosophers' Imprint 14.
    Anti-behaviorist arguments against the validity of the Turing Test as a sufficient condition for attributing intelligence are based on a memorizing machine, which has recorded within it responses to every possible Turing Test interaction of up to a fixed length. The mere possibility of such a machine is claimed to be enough to invalidate the Turing Test. I consider the nomological possibility of memorizing machines, and how long a Turing Test they can pass. I replicate my previous analysis of this (...)
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  45. Expected Utility Consistent Extensions of Preferences.Burak Can, Bora Erdamar & M. Remzi Sanver - 2009 - Theory and Decision 67 (2):123-144.
    We consider the problem of extending a (complete) order over a set to its power set. The extension axioms we consider generate orderings over sets according to their expected utilities induced by some assignment of utilities over alternatives and probability distributions over sets. The model we propose gives a general and unified exposition of expected utility consistent extensions whilst it allows to emphasize various subtleties, the effects of which seem to be underestimated – particularly in the literature on strategy-proof social (...)
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  46.  23
    What Can Psychology Tell Us About Business Ethics?David M. Messick - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S1):73-80.
    Insights from contemporary psychology can illuminate the common psychological processes that facilitate unethical decision making. I will illustrate several of these processes and describe steps that may be taken to reduce or eliminate the undesirable consequences of these processes. A generic problem with these processes is that they are totally invisible to decision makers – i. e., decision makers are convinced that their decisions are ethically and managerially sound.
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  47. Can a Real Distinction Be Made Between Cognitive Theories of Analogy and Categorisation.M. Ramscar & H. Pain - 1996 - In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 346--351.
  48. R. M. Adams’s Theodicy of Grace.Richard M. Gale - 1998 - Philo 1 (1):36-44.
    R. M. Adams’s essay, “Must God Create the Best?” can be interpreted as offering a theodicy for God’s creating morally less perfect beings than he could have created. By creating these morally less perfect beings, God is bestowing grace upon them, which is an unmerited or undeserved benefit. He does so, however, in advance of the free moral misdeeds that render them undeserving. This requires that God have middle knowledge, pace Adams’s version of the Free Will Theodicy, of what would (...)
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  49.  84
    Predictive Brains, Dreaming Selves, Sleeping Bodies: How the Analysis of Dream Movement Can Inform a Theory of Self- and World-Simulation in Dreams.Jennifer M. Windt - 2018 - Synthese 195 (6):2577-2625.
    In this paper, I discuss the relationship between bodily experiences in dreams and the sleeping, physical body. I question the popular view that dreaming is a naturally and frequently occurring real-world example of cranial envatment. This view states that dreams are functionally disembodied states: in a majority of dreams, phenomenal experience, including the phenomenology of embodied selfhood, unfolds completely independently of external and peripheral stimuli and outward movement. I advance an alternative and more empirically plausible view of dreams as weakly (...)
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  50.  11
    What Can the Organization of the Brain’s Default Mode Network Tell Us About Self-Knowledge?Joseph M. Moran, William M. Kelley & Todd F. Heatherton - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
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