Results for 'Car industry'

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  1.  17
    The Launch of Banking Instruments and the Figuration of Markets. The Case of the Polish Car-Trading Industry.Herbert Kalthoff - 2006 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 36 (4):347–368.
    The paper aims at analyzing the production of creditworthiness within the context of commercial banking in international banks. Taking the interim financing in the Polish automobile sector as an example, the paper reconstructs the process between legal framing of the financial instrument, marketing, and risk management. Firstly, it shows that changes in the state vehicle registry function as a prerequisite upon which the bank uses the newly introduced vehicle registration document as a security. Secondly, it analyzes the change of perspectives (...)
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  2.  48
    Beyond the Bounded Instrumentality in Current Corporate Sustainability Research: Toward an Inclusive Notion of Profitability. [REVIEW]Tobias Hahn & Frank Figge - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (3):325-345.
    We argue that the majority of the current approaches in research on corporate sustainability are inconsistent with the notion of sustainable development. By defining the notion of instrumentality in the context of corporate sustainability through three conceptual principles we show that current approaches are rooted in a bounded notion of instrumentality which establishes a systematic a priori predominance of economic organizational outcomes over environmental and social aspects. We propose an inclusive notion of profitability that reflects the return on all forms (...)
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  3.  28
    King Car and the Ethics of Automobile Proponents' Strategies in China.Martin Calkins - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S1):157 - 172.
    This paper examines the ethics of government policies and automobile industry strategies as China rapidly adopts the automobile on a widespread basis. It begins by looking at the context of auto adoption in America in the twentieth century and then contrasts this with the situation in China today. It next analyzes government and auto company strategies along three moral criteria and concludes that current strategies are consistent yet ethically wrongful. In the end, it recommends the abandonment of current antiquated (...)
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  4.  14
    Employment Struggles and the Commodification of Time.Alan Tuckman - 2005 - Philosophy of Management 5 (2):47-56.
    This paper explores new working time arrangements around a critique of the ‘commodification of time’ to illuminate the contradictions of such new flexibilities. Two features of these new arrangements are seen as relevant for evaluating the Marx/Engels analysis. Firstly, it roots the examination of time in commodification, although, as criticised in this paper, some authors have seen this as the generality of time rather than that within the exchange of labour power. Significantly – and central in all working time arrangements (...)
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  5. Corporate Social Responsibility in the Supply Chain: An Application in the Food Industry.Michael J. Maloni & Michael E. Brown - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (1):35-52.
    The food industry faces many significant risks from public criticism of corporate social responsibility (CSR) issues in the supply chain. This paper draws upon previous research and emerging industry trends to develop a comprehensive framework of supply chain CSR in the industry. The framework details unique CSR applications in the food supply chain including animal welfare, biotechnology, environment, fair trade, health and safety, and labor and human rights. General supply chain CSR issues such as community and procurement (...)
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  6.  90
    CSR Business as Usual? The Case of the Tobacco Industry.Guido Palazzo & Ulf Richter - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (4):387-401.
    Tobacco companies have started to position themselves as good corporate citizens. The effort towards CSR engagement in the tobacco industry is not only heavily criticized by anti-tobacco NGOs. Some opponents such as the the World Health Organization have even categorically questioned the possibility of social responsibility in the tobacco industry. The paper will demonstrate that the deep distrust towards tobacco companies is linked to the lethal character of their products and the dubious behavior of their representatives in recent (...)
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  7.  50
    Corporate Philanthropic Giving, Advertising Intensity, and Industry Competition Level.Ran Zhang, Jigao Zhu, Heng Yue & Chunyan Zhu - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):39-52.
    This article examines whether the likelihood and amount of firm charitable giving in response to catastrophic events are related to firm advertising intensity, and whether industry competition level moderates this relationship. Using data on Chinese firms’ philanthropic response to the 2008 Sichuan earthquake, we find that firm advertising intensity is positively associated with both the probability and the amount of corporate giving. The results also indicate that this positive advertising intensity-philanthropic giving relationship is stronger in competitive industries, and firms (...)
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  8.  24
    The Effects of Firm Size and Industry on Corporate Giving.Louis H. Amato & Christie H. Amato - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 72 (3):229-241.
    Recent downward trends in corporate giving have renewed interest in the factors that shape corporate philanthropy. This paper examines the relationships between charitable contributions, firm size and industry. Improvements over previous studies include an IRS data base that covers a much broader range of firm sizes and industries as compared to previous studies and estimation using an instrumental variable technique that explicitly addresses potential simultaneity between charitable contributions and profitability. Important findings provide evidence of a cubic relationship between charitable (...)
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  9.  61
    Does CSR Reduce Firm Risk? Evidence From Controversial Industry Sectors.Hoje Jo & Haejung Na - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (4):441-456.
    In this paper, we examine the relation between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and firm risk in controversial industry sectors. We develop and test two competing hypotheses of risk reduction and window dressing. Employing an extensive U.S. sample during the 1991-2010 period from controversial industry firms, such as alcohol, tobacco, gambling, and others, we find that CSR engagement inversely affects firm risk after controlling for various firm characteristics. To deal with endogeneity issue, we adopt a system equation approach and (...)
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  10.  65
    Those Who Have the Gold Make the Evidence: How the Pharmaceutical Industry Biases the Outcomes of Clinical Trials of Medications. [REVIEW]Joel Lexchin - 2012 - Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):247-261.
    Pharmaceutical companies fund the bulk of clinical research that is carried out on medications. Poor outcomes from these studies can have negative effects on sales of medicines. Previous research has shown that company funded research is much more likely to yield positive outcomes than research with any other sponsorship. The aim of this article is to investigate the possible ways in which bias can be introduced into research outcomes by drawing on concrete examples from the published literature. Poorer methodology in (...)
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  11. Beyond the Game: Perceptions and Practices of Corporate Social Responsibility in the Professional Sport Industry.Hela Sheth & Kathy M. Babiak - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (3):433-450.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is an area of great interest, yet little is known about how CSR is perceived and practiced in the professional sport industry. This study employs a mixed-methods approach, including a survey, and a qualitative content analysis of responses to open-ended questions, to explore how professional sport executives define CSR, and what priorities teams have regarding their CSR activities. Findings from this study indicate that sport executives placed different emphases on elements of CSR including a focus (...)
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  12. Ethical Issues in the Music Industry Response to Innovation and Piracy.Robert F. Easley - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 62 (2):163-168.
    The current conflict between the recording industry and a portion of its customers who are involved in illicit copying of music files arose from innovations involving the compression and electronic distribution of files over the internet. This paper briefly describes some of the challenges faced by the recording industry, and examines some of the ethical issues that arise in various industry and consumer responses to the opportunities and threats presented by these innovations. The paper concludes by highlighting (...)
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  13.  40
    Governing Corporate Social Responsibility: An Assessment of the Contribution of the UN Global Compact to CSR Strategies in the Telecommunications Industry.Hens Runhaar & Helene Lafferty - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (4):479-495.
    CSR has become an important element in the business strategy of a growing number of companies worldwide. A large number of initiatives have been developed that aim to support companies in developing, implementing, and communicating about CSR. The Global Compact (GC), initiated by the United Nations, stands out. Since its launch in 2000, it has grown to about 2900 companies and 3800 members in total. The GC combines several mechanisms to support CSR strategies: normative principles, networks for learning and co-operation, (...)
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  14.  22
    Retail Philanthropy: Firm Size, Industry, and Business Cycle. [REVIEW]Louis H. Amato & Christie H. Amato - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 107 (4):435-448.
    This article investigates the effects of firm size, profitability, industry affiliation, and the business cycle on retailer philanthropy. The importance of industry and firm effects on giving was analyzed with regression models using industry-fixed effects as well as firm strategy variables. The analysis included instrumental variables methodology to account for simultaneity in the charitable giving–profits relationship. Data were gathered from the IRS Corporate Statistics of Income Sourcebook, data that provide firm size class measures covering the entire firm (...)
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  15. Just War and Non-Combatants in the Private Military Industry.Paul Richard Daniels - 2015 - Journal of Military Ethics 14 (2):146-161.
    I argue that, according to Just War Theory, those who work as administrative personnel in the private military industry can be permissibly harmed while at work by enemy combatants. That is, for better or worse, a Just War theorist should consider all those who work as administrative personnel in the private military industry either: (i) individuals who may be permissibly restrained with lethal force while at work, or (ii) individuals who may be harmed by permissible attacks against their (...)
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  16.  29
    Perceptions of the Ethical Climate in the Korean Tourism Industry.Nan Young Kim & Graham Miller - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):941-954.
    This study investigates the ethical climate types presented in the Korean tourism industry, the differences in the perceptions of these ethical climate types based on individual/organizational characteristics, and the influence of ethical climate types based on job satisfaction/organizational commitment. Empirical findings of this study identify six ethical climate types and demonstrate significant difference and significant influence of the proposed relationships. This research contributes to the existing body of academic work by using empirical data collected from 820 respondents across 14 (...)
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  17.  50
    Exploring Psychology in the Field: Steps and Examples From the Used-Car Market.Devin G. Pope - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (3):660-669.
    The growing availability of large datasets in a variety of domains presents an opportunity for researchers to use field data to better understand psychological concepts. I discuss, from an empirical economics point of view, steps for how to study cognition in large datasets. I use two recent papers that explore psychology in the used-car market as motivating examples. These examples help illustrate the potential importance of big data as a way to explore human psychology and cognition.
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  18.  5
    Mattel, Inc.: Global Manufacturing Principles (GMP) - A Life-Cycle Analysis of a Company-Based Code of Conduct in the Toy Industry[REVIEW]S. Prakash Sethi, Emre A. Veral, H. Jack Shapiro & Olga Emelianova - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (4):483 - 517.
    Over the last 20+ years, multinational corporations (MNCs) have been confronted with accusations of abuse of market power and unfair and unethical business conduct especially as it relates to their overseas operations and supply chain management. These accusations include, among others, worker exploitation in terms of unfairly low wages, excessive work hours, and unsafe work environment; pollution and contamination of air, ground water and land resources; and, undermining the ability of natural government to protect the well-being of their citizens. MNCs (...)
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  19. From Evidence-Based Medicine to Marketing-Based Medicine: Evidence From Internal Industry Documents. [REVIEW]Glen I. Spielmans & Peter I. Parry - 2010 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (1):13-29.
    While much excitement has been generated surrounding evidence-based medicine, internal documents from the pharmaceutical industry suggest that the publicly available evidence base may not accurately represent the underlying data regarding its products. The industry and its associated medical communication firms state that publications in the medical literature primarily serve marketing interests. Suppression and spinning of negative data and ghostwriting have emerged as tools to help manage medical journal publications to best suit product sales, while disease mongering and market (...)
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  20.  18
    Can an Industry Be Socially Responsible If Its Products Harm Consumers? The Case of Online Gambling.Mirella Yani-de-Soriano, Uzma Javed & Shumaila Yousafzai - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (4):481-497.
    Online gambling companies claim that they are ethical providers. They seem committed to corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices that are aimed at preventing or minimising the harm associated with their activities. Our empirical research employed a sample of 209 university student online gamblers, who took part in an online survey. Our findings suggest that the extent of online problem gambling is substantial and that it adversely impacts on the gambler's mental and physical health, social relationships and academic performance. Online problem (...)
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  21.  15
    Corruption and Internal Fraud in the Turkish Construction Industry.Murat Gunduz & Oytun Önder - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):505-528.
    The purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding about the internal fraud and corruption problem in the Turkish construction industry. The reasons behind the internal fraud and corruption problem as well as the types of prevention methods were investigated; and as a result various recommendations were made. To this end, a risk awareness questionnaire was used to understand the behavioral patterns of the construction industry, and to clarify possible proactive and reactive measures against internal fraud and (...)
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  22.  4
    Midstream Modulation in Biotechnology Industry: Redefining What is 'Part of the Job' of Researchers in Industry[REVIEW]Steven M. Flipse, Maarten C. A. Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1141-1164.
    In response to an increasing amount of policy papers stressing the need for integrating social and ethical aspects in Research and Development (R&D) practices, science studies scholars have conducted integrative research and experiments with science and innovation actors. One widely employed integration method is Midstream Modulation (MM), in which an ‘embedded humanist’ interacts in regular meetings with researchers to engage them with the social and ethical aspects of their work. While the possibility of using MM to enhance critical reflection has (...)
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  23.  27
    Processes and Consequences in Business Ethicaldilemmas: The Oil Industry and Climate Change. [REVIEW]Marc Le Menestrel & Henri-Claude de Bettignies - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 41 (3):251-266.
    We present a model of rational behavior by which we characterize business ethical dilemmas as trade-offs between processes and consequences. As an illustration, we formulate the oil industry's business ethical dilemma as a trade-off between a socially detrimental process (emitting greenhouse gases, hence inducing a risk of climate change) and a self-interested consequence (profits). The proposed framework allows us to specify two types of strategies, differing by whether priority is given to the consequences or to the processes. We analyze (...)
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  24. Market Rebels: How Activists Make or Break Radical Innovations.Hayagreeva Rao - 2008 - Princeton University Press.
    Great individuals are assumed to cause the success of radical innovations--thus Henry Ford is depicted as the one who established the automobile industry in America. Hayagreeva Rao tells a different story, one that will change the way you think about markets forever. He explains how "market rebels"--activists who defy authority and convention--are the real force behind the success or failure of radical innovations. Rao shows how automobile enthusiasts were the ones who established the new automobile industry by staging (...)
     
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  25.  34
    Hazardous Employment and Regulatory Regimes in the South African Mining Industry: Arguments for Corporate Ethics at Workplace.Gabriel Eweje - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (2):163-183.
    This study examines the ethical position and behaviour of multinational mining companies regarding hazardous employment and health and safety of employees in the South African mining industry. Mining companies have long had a reputation for being unethical on health and safety issues. Too often there are occurrences of fatal accidents, which bring the ethical behaviour of multinational mining companies into question. The litmus test for the mining companies is to devise benchmark standards that will reduce accidents tremendously at their (...)
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  26.  47
    Extraordinary Pricing of Orphan Drugs: Is It a Socially Responsible Strategy for the U.S. Pharmaceutical Industry[REVIEW]Thomas A. Hemphill - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (2):225 - 242.
    The PRIME Institute of the College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota, recently released preliminary research findings indicating a trend of extraordinary pharmaceutical industry pricing of drug products in the United States (U.S.). According to researchers at the PRIME Institute, such extraordinary price increases are defined as any price increase that is equal to, or greater than, 100% at a single point in time. In some instances, PRIME Institute researchers found that drugs exhibiting extraordinary price increases are categorized as "orphan (...)
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  27.  43
    Benchmarking and Transparency: Incentives for the Pharmaceutical Industry's Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW]Matthew Lee & Jillian Kohler - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):641-658.
    With over 2 billion people lacking medicines for treatable diseases and 14 million people dying annually from infectious disease, there is undeniable need for increased access to medicines. There has been an increasing trend to benchmark the pharmaceutical industry on their corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance in access to medicines. Benchmarking creates a competitive inter-business environment and acts as incentive for improving CSR. This article investigates the corporate feedback discourses pharmaceutical companies make in response to criticisms from benchmarking reports. (...)
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  28.  3
    Midstream Modulation in Biotechnology Industry: Redefining What is 'Part of the Job' of Researchers in Industry[REVIEW]Steven M. Flipse, Maarten Ca van der Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1141-1164.
    In response to an increasing amount of policy papers stressing the need for integrating social and ethical aspects in Research and Development (R&D) practices, science studies scholars have conducted integrative research and experiments with science and innovation actors. One widely employed integration method is Midstream Modulation (MM), in which an ‘embedded humanist’ interacts in regular meetings with researchers to engage them with the social and ethical aspects of their work. While the possibility of using MM to enhance critical reflection has (...)
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  29.  14
    The Training of “Triple Helix Workers”? Doctoral Students in University–Industry–Government Collaborations.Taran Thune - 2010 - Minerva 48 (4):463-483.
    Changes in knowledge production, increasing interaction between government, universities and industry, and changes in labor markets for doctoral degree holders are forces that have spurred a debate about the organization of doctoral education and the competencies graduates need to master to work as scientists and researchers in a triple helix research context. Recent policy also has supported a redefinition of researcher training with increasing focus on broader skills and relevance for careers outside the university sector. Consequently, it is pertinent (...)
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  30.  18
    Ethically Questionable Behavior in Sales Representatives — An Example From the Taiwanese Pharmaceutical Industry.Ya-Hui Hsu, Wenchang Fang & Yuanchung Lee - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S1):155 - 166.
    Recent corporate disgraces and corruption have heightened concerns about ethically questionable behavior in business. The construct of ethically questionable behavior is an under-portrayed area of management field research, and deserves further studying, especially in sales positions. This study uses four variables from the human resource management field to explain the ethically questionable behavior of sales representatives in the pharmaceutical industry. These variables include frame pattern, commission structure, behavior control type, and marketing norm perceptions. This work uses a 2  (...)
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  31.  30
    The Law and Ethics of the Pharmaceutical Industry.M. N. G. Dukes - 2005 - Elsevier.
    As one of the most massive and successful business sectors, the pharmaceutical industry is a potent force for good in the community, yet its behaviour is frequently questioned: could it serve society at large better than it has done in the recent past? Its own internal ethics, both in business and science, may need a careful reappraisal, as may the extent to which the law - administrative, civil and criminal - succeeds in guiding (and where neccessary contraining) it. The (...)
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  32.  16
    How Pharmaceutical Industry Employees Manage Competing Commitments in the Face of Public Criticism.Wendy Lipworth, Kathleen Montgomery & Miles Little - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):355-367.
    The pharmaceutical industry has been criticised for pervasive misconduct. These concerns have generally resulted in increasing regulation. While such regulation is no doubt necessary, it tends to assume that everyone working for pharmaceutical companies is equally motivated by commerce, without much understanding of the specific views and experiences of those who work in different parts of the industry. In order to gain a more nuanced picture of the work that goes on in the “medical affairs” departments of pharmaceutical (...)
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  33.  9
    Of Mugs, Meals and More: The Intricate Relations Between Physicians and the Medical Industry[REVIEW]Stephan Sahm - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):265-273.
    Empirical research has proven the influence exerted by the medical industry on physicians’ decision-making. Physicians are the gatekeepers who determine how money is spent within the healthcare system. Hence, they are the target group of powerful lobbies in the field, i.e. the manufacturers of medical devices and the pharmaceutical industry. As clinical research lies in the hands of physicians, they play an exclusive and central role in launching new medical products. There are many ethical problems involved here: physicians (...)
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  34.  17
    Cultural Competences: An Important Resource in the Industry–NGO Dialog.Maria Joutsenvirta & Liisa Uusitalo - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (3):379-390.
    This article explores the concept of cultural competence and its relevance as an organizational resource in ethical disputes. Empirically, we aim to reveal the cultural competences that a global forest industry company, StoraEnso, and a global environmental nongovernmental organization (NGO), Greenpeace, utilized in forestry conflicts during 1985–2001. Our study is based on data which were collected from corporate and NGO communication outlets and which have gone through a detailed discourse-semiotic analysis. Our reinterpretation of the discourses identified three cultural competences: (...)
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  35.  15
    The U.S. Radium Industry: Industrial In-House Research and the Commercialization of Science. [REVIEW]Maria Rentetzi - 2008 - Minerva 46 (4):437-462.
    A fierce debate ensued after the announcement in 1913 in the U.S.A. that all rights and ownership of radium-bearing ores found on public land would be reserved by the government. At stake was the State monopolization of radium that pitted powerful industrialists with radium claims, mainly in the Colorado area, against the Bureau of Mines and prestigious physicians who wished to reserve radium for medical uses. This article describes the strategies of one of the biggest U.S. radium industries that dominated (...)
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  36.  14
    How Technological Platforms Reconfigure Science-Industry Relations: The Case of Micro- and Nanotechnology. [REVIEW]Martina Merz & Peter Biniok - 2010 - Minerva 48 (2):105-124.
    With reference to the recent science studies debate on the nature of science-industry relationship, this article focuses on a novel organizational form: the technological platform. Considering the field of micro- and nanotechnology in Switzerland, it investigates how technological platforms participate in framing science-industry activities. On the basis of a comparative analysis of three technological platforms, it shows that the platforms relate distinctly to academic and to industrial users. It distinguishes three pairs of user models, one model in each (...)
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  37.  22
    Diversity Management and Demographic Differences-Based Discrimination: The Case of Turkish Manufacturing Industry.Sevki Ozgener - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):621-631.
    In the late 1980s workforce became more diverse in terms of demographic changes, cultural differences and other characteristics of organizational members. This diversity was a reflection of changing global markets. Workforce diversity has both positive and negative effects on organizational performance. Therefore, it is becoming important especially for medium- and large-scale businesses. In order to manage increasingly workforce diversity and to prevent discrimination, diversity management is now considered as a major part of strategic human resource management. The purpose of this (...)
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  38.  3
    Automobilities.M. Featherstone - 2004 - Theory, Culture and Society 21 (4-5):1-24.
    This wide-ranging introduction to the special issue on Automobilities examines various dimensions of the automobile system and car cultures. In its broadest sense we can think of many automobilities - modes of autonomous, self-directed movement. It can be argued that there are many different car cultures and autoscapes which operate around the world, which cannot be seen as making driving a uniform experience of movement in a controlled 'no-place' space. Yet, there clearly is an increasingly globalizing car system, conceptualized as (...)
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  39.  54
    Towards Understanding the Impacts of the Pet Food Industry on World Fish and Seafood Supplies.Sena S. De Silva & Giovanni M. Turchini - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (5):459-467.
    The status of wild capture fisheries has induced many fisheries and conservation scientists to express concerns about the concept of using forage fish after reduction to fishmeal and fish oil, as feed for farmed animals, particularly in aquaculture. However, a very large quantity of forage fish is being also used untransformed (fresh or frozen) globally for other purposes, such as the pet food industry. So far, no attempts have been made to estimate this quantum, and have been omitted in (...)
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  40.  22
    Innovation Systems in Malaysia: A Perspective of University—Industry R&D Collaboration. [REVIEW]V. G. R. Chandran, Veera Pandiyan Kaliani Sundram & Sinnappan Santhidran - 2014 - AI and Society 29 (3):435-444.
    Collaborative research and development (R&D) activities between public universities and industry are of importance for the sustainable development of the innovation ecosystem. However, policymakers especially in developing countries show little knowledge on the issues. In this paper, we analyse the level of university–industry collaboration in Malaysia. We further examine the fundamental conditions that hinder university–industry collaboration despite the government’s initiatives to improve such linkages. We show that the low collaboration is a result of an R&D gap between (...)
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  41.  19
    Strategic Interventions to Enhance Competitiveness: A Case of Surat Zari Industry in India. [REVIEW]Renuka Garg & Manish Sidhpuria - 2015 - AI and Society 30 (2):235-249.
    Surat zari industry is one of the oldest industries in Surat (Gujarat state in the western part of India) dating back to the sixteenth century. It enjoys the status of cottage industry since 1955. Zari is an intermediate product broadly catering to two end-user industries—textiles industry including handicrafts and the fashion industry. It is largely a family-owned, community-based, skilled-oriented, fragmented industry, with a very low level of automation, experiencing intensive rivalry. Zari making involves a series (...)
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  42.  17
    From Epistemology toGnoseology: Foundations of the Knowledge Industry[REVIEW]F. Alonso-Amo, J. L. Maté, J. L. Morant & J. Pazos - 1992 - AI and Society 6 (2):140-165.
    In this paper, the foundations for setting up a knowledge industry are laid. Firstly, it is established that this industry constitutes the only way of making use of the huge amounts of knowledge produced as a result of the introduction of the Science-Technology binomial in postindustrial society. Then, the elements which will lead to such an industry are defined, that is, the resources and means. Under the ‘Means’ section, special emphasis is placed on the processes involved, in (...)
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  43.  21
    Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility and Orphan Drug Development: Insights From the US and the EU Biopharmaceutical Industry[REVIEW]Olga Bruyaka, Hanko K. Zeitzmann, Isabelle Chalamon, Richard E. Wokutch & Pooja Thakur - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):45-65.
    In recent years, the biopharmaceutical industry has seen an increase in the development of so-called orphan drugs for the treatment of rare and neglected diseases. This increase has been spurred on by legislation in the United States, Europe, and elsewhere designed to promote orphan drug development. In this article, we examine the drivers of corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities in orphan drug markets and the extent to which biopharmaceutical firms engage in these activities with a strategic orientation. The unique (...)
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  44.  33
    Taking Conflicts of Interest Seriously Without Overdoing It: Promises and Perils of Academic-Industry Partnerships. [REVIEW]Jason Borenstein & Yvette E. Pearson - 2008 - Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (3):229-243.
    Academic-industry collaborations and the conflicts of interest (COI) arising out of them are not new. However, as industry funding for research in the life and health sciences has increased and scandals involving financial COI are brought to the public’s attention, demands for disclosure have grown. In a March 2008 American Council on Science and Health report by Ronald Bailey, he argues that the focus on COI—especially financial COI—is obsessive and likely to be more detrimental to scientific progress and (...)
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  45.  13
    Action Research in Policy Making: A Case in the Dairy Industry in Gujarat, India. [REVIEW]Dhawal Mehta, Jatin Pancholi & Paurav Shukla - 2004 - AI and Society 18 (4):344-363.
    Action research has been extensively used world-wide for decision making related to policy due to its nature of involving the researcher and decision maker in the process. Following independence in India, one of the major revolutions was brought about in the dairy sector with regard to complete management systems. Most innovations and changes occurred in the line function while the staff function was more often neglected in the overall change. The authors undertook an action research study focusing on staff function (...)
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  46.  21
    The Contribution of the Energy Industry to the Millennium Development Goals: A Benchmark Study. [REVIEW]Carmen Valor - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (3):277-287.
    This paper evaluates the contribution of the energy industry (oil, gas and electricity) to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in three countries (Argentina, Colombia and Mexico). To build this international benchmark, a tool was built (the MDG-Scorecard), by drawing on theoretical frameworks and guides on how businesses can contribute to the MDGs. Results show that companies are making efforts to contribute to the environment, human rights, employment creation and labour rights. However, their effort is close to nil for the (...)
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  47.  20
    Notes From Small Industry Clusters: Making Sense of Knowledge and Barriers to Innovation. [REVIEW]Rahul Varman & Manali Chakrabarti - 2011 - AI and Society 26 (4):393-415.
    It has been well established in literature that small industry clusters (SICs) have an impressive record of innovation and knowledge transmission. This paper explores the possibilities in this regard in third-world clusters through an empirical study of three SICs in India. The paper first examines the essential reasons for the survival and growth of clusters temporally over centuries. Then, it critically assesses the factors that threaten the clusters at present—some of which, it appears, might actually be fatal for these (...)
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  48.  20
    Medicine and Pharmacy — Facts and Myths About the Development of an Innovative Pharmaceutical Industry in Poland.Włodzimierz Kubiak - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (1):41-51.
    Innovation is fundamental to the pharmaceutical industry and a key to improvements in healthcare. Its effectiveness depends on huge, constant investments in research. This innovative industry directly affects the course of studies in healthcare and medicine. Its efforts translate directly into the length and quality of our lives. For several years now, the progress underway in pharmaceutical industry has produced measurable benefits. Doctors have new pharmaceuticals at their disposal, including many types of antibiotics and anti-viral drugs, vaccines (...)
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  49.  11
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Firm Productivity: Evidence From the Chemical Industry in the United States.Li Sun & Marty Stuebs - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (2):251-263.
    Prior research suggests that participating in corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities can lead to higher future productivity. However, the empirical evidence is still scarce. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between CSR and future firm productivity in the U.S. chemical industry. Specifically, this study examines the relationship between CSR in year t and firm productivity in year (t + 1), (t + 2), and (t + 3). We use Data Envelopment Analysis, a non-parametric method, to (...)
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  50.  16
    The Effectiveness of the Public Support Policies for the European Industry Financing as a Contribution to Sustainable Development.Juana María Rivera-Lirio & María Jesús Muñoz-Torres - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (4):489 - 515.
    In recent years, the debate about the role of the Public Institutions in the fields of corporate social responsibility and sustainable development has gained momentum. Nevertheless, the ambiguity of the latter concepts makes it difficult both to measure them and to estimate the impact that the different public initiatives may have on them. In this sense, the present research has the aim to design a fuzzy logic-based methodology applied to the evaluation of the above-mentioned processes in relation to the state-aid (...)
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