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  1.  15
    Examining Interprofessional Education Through the Lens of Interdisciplinarity: Power, Knowledge and New Ontological Subjects.Rebecca E. Olson & Caragh Brosnan - 2017 - Minerva 55 (3):299-319.
    Interprofessional education – students of different professions learning together, from and about each other – is increasingly common in health professional degrees. Despite its explicit aims of transforming identities, practices and relationships within/across health professions, IPE remains under-theorised sociologically, with most IPE scholarship focussed on evaluating specific interventions. In particular, the significance of a shared knowledge base for shaping professional power and subjectivity in IPE has been overlooked. In this paper we begin to develop a framework for theorising IPE in (...)
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  2.  19
    The Significance of Scientific Capital in UK Medical Education.Caragh Brosnan - 2011 - Minerva 49 (3):317-332.
    For decades, debates over medical curriculum reform have centred on the role of science in medical education, but the meaning of ‘science’ in this domain is vague and the persistence of the debate has not been explained. Following Bourdieu, this paper examines struggles over legitimate knowledge and the forms of capital associated with science in contemporary UK medical education. Data are presented from a study of two UK medical schools, one with a traditional, science-oriented curriculum, another with an integrated curriculum. (...)
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  3.  3
    Between the Bench, the Bedside and the Office: The Need to Build Bridges Between Working Neuroscientists and Ethicists.Caragh Brosnan & Alan Cribb - 2014 - Clinical Ethics 9 (4):113-119.
    This paper presents findings from an empirical study that explored the meaning of ethics in the everyday work of neuroscientists. Observation and interviews were carried out in one neuroscience research group that was involved in bench-to-bedside translational research. We focus here specifically on the scientists’ perceptions of bioethics. Interviewees were often unfamiliar with bioethics as a discipline, particularly the more junior members of the group. Those who were aware of its existence largely viewed it as something distant from them, and (...)
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    Disclosure of Suicidal Thoughts During an E-Mental Health Intervention: Relational Ethics Meets Actor-Network Theory.Milena Heinsch, Jenny Geddes, Dara Sampson, Caragh Brosnan, Sally Hunt, Hannah Wells & Frances Kay-Lambkin - 2021 - Ethics and Behavior 31 (3):151-170.
    ABSTRACT The technological revolution has created enormous opportunities for the provision of affordable, accessible, and flexible mental healthcare. Yet it also creates complexities and ethical challenges. While some of these challenges may be similar to face-to-face care, their nuance in the online milieu is different, as relationships, identities and boundaries in this setting are fluid, and there is an absence of physical presence. In this paper we consider the specific ethical complexities involved in the provision of a social networking intervention (...)
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