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Carl Mika [22]Carl Te Hira Mika [2]Carl T. Mika [1]
  1.  99
    Towards a Philosophy of Academic Publishing.Michael A. Peters, Petar Jandrić, Ruth Irwin, Kirsten Locke, Nesta Devine, Richard Heraud, Andrew Gibbons, Tina Besley, Jayne White, Daniella Forster, Liz Jackson, Elizabeth Grierson, Carl Mika, Georgina Stewart, Marek Tesar, Susanne Brighouse, Sonja Arndt, George Lazaroiu, Ramona Mihaila, Catherine Legg & Leon Benade - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (14):1401-1425.
    This article is concerned with developing a philosophical approach to a number of significant changes to academic publishing, and specifically the global journal knowledge system wrought by a range of new digital technologies that herald the third age of the journal as an electronic, interactive and mixed-media form of scientific communication. The paper emerges from an Editors' Collective, a small New Zealand-based organisation comprised of editors and reviewers of academic journals mostly in the fields of education and philosophy. The paper (...)
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  2.  5
    Philosophy of Education in a New Key.Michael A. Peters, Sonja Arndt, Marek Tesar, Liz Jackson, Ruyu Hung, Carl Mika, Janis T. Ozolins, Christoph Teschers, Janet Orchard, Rachel Buchanan, Andrew Madjar, Rene Novak, Tina Besley, Sean Sturm, Peter Roberts & Andrew Gibbons - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-22.
    Michael Peters, Sonja Arndt & Marek TesarThis is a collective writing experiment of PESA members, including its Executive Committee, asking questions of the Philosophy of Education in a New Key. Co...
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  3.  33
    Counter-Colonial and Philosophical Claims: An Indigenous Observation of Western Philosophy.Carl Mika - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (11):1136-1142.
    Providing an indigenous opinion on anything is a difficult task. To be sure, there is a multitude of possible indigenous responses to dominant Western philosophy. My aim in this paper is to assess dominant analytic Western philosophy in light of the general insistence of most indigenous authors that indigenous metaphysics is holistic, and to make some bold claims about both dominant Western philosophy in line with an indigenous metaphysics of holism. There will, of course, be different ways of expressing holism (...)
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  4.  40
    Exploring Whakaaro: A Way of Responsive Thinking in Maori Research.Carl Mika & Kim Southey - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):795-803.
    The experience of researching as a Māori student within academia will often raise questions about how and whether the student’s research privileges Māori world views and articulates culturally specific epistemologies. This study offers some theorising, from the perspectives of a Maori doctoral student and her Maori supervisor, on the metaphysical nature of research for Maori. It emphasises that there is a space for speculative, creative and responsive thinking as a central method in the student’s doctoral research and describes how access (...)
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  5.  23
    Māori in the Kingdom of the Gaze: Subjects or Critics?Carl Mika & Georgina Stewart - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (3).
    For Māori, a real opportunity exists to flesh out some terms and concepts that Western thinkers have adopted and that precede disciplines but necessarily inform them. In this article, we are intent on describing one of these precursory phenomena—Foucault’s Gaze—within a framework that accords with a Māori philosophical framework. Our discussion is focused on the potential and limits of colonised thinking, which has huge implications for such disciplines as education, among others. We have placed Foucault’s Gaze alongside a Māori metaphysics (...)
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  6.  15
    Introducing the Indigenous Philosophy Group.Georgina Stewart, Carl Mika, Garrick Cooper, Vaughan Bidois & Te Kawehau Hoskins - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (9):851-855.
  7.  13
    Refusing the ‘Foolish Wisdom of Resignation’: Kaupapa Māori in Conversation with Adorno.Monika Kirloskar-Steinbach & Carl Mika - 2019 - European Journal of Social Theory:1-18.
    Drawing on select works of Adorno, we will first rehearse his reasons for a rejuvenation of philosophy and apply them to philosophers working on world philosophical traditions. We will then analyse Adorno’s arguments pertaining to the theory–praxis relation to ascertain whether his thought could accommodate a study of world philosophical traditions for the simple reason that they are present in a particular society. Shifting our focus slightly, we reflect upon how current ways of professional philosophizing affect the study of world (...)
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  8.  18
    Aborigine, Indian, Indigenous or First Nations?Michael A. Peters & Carl T. Mika - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (13):1229-1234.
  9.  1
    Refusing the ‘Foolish Wisdom of Resignation’: Kaupapa Māori in Conversation with Adorno.Carl Mika & Monika Kirloskar-Steinbach - 2020 - European Journal of Social Theory 23 (4):532-549.
    Drawing on select works of Adorno, we will first rehearse his reasons for a rejuvenation of philosophy and apply them to philosophers working on world philosophical traditions. We will then analyse Adorno’s arguments pertaining to the theory–praxis relation to ascertain whether his thought could accommodate a study of world philosophical traditions for the simple reason that they are present in a particular society. Shifting our focus slightly, we reflect upon how current ways of professional philosophizing affect the study of world (...)
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  10.  46
    Overcoming ‘Being’ in Favour of Knowledge: The Fixing Effect of ‘Mātauranga’.Carl Te Hira Mika - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (10):1080-1092.
    It is common to hear Māori discuss primordial states of Being, yet in colonisation those very central beliefs are forced into weaker utterances. In this process those utterances merely conform to a colonised agenda. ‘Mātauranga’, a tidy term that overwhelmingly refers to an epistemological knowing of the world, colludes nicely with its English equivalent, ‘knowledge’, to further colonise those core contemplations of Being. Its plausibility relies on an orderly regard of things in the world. In education, historical and current practices (...)
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  11.  6
    Bakhtin in the Fullness of Time: Bakhtinian Theory and the Process of Social Education.Craig Brandist, Michael E. Gardiner, Jayne White & Carl Mika - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (9):849-853.
  12.  7
    Situating Decolonization: An Indigenous Dilemma.Brian Martin, Georgina Stewart, Bruce Ka’imi Watson, Ola Keola Silva, Jeanne Teisina, Jacoba Matapo & Carl Mika - 2020 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 52 (3):312-321.
    Being Indigenous and operating in an institution such as a university places us in a complex position. The premise of decolonizing history, literature, curriculum, and thought in general creates a tenuous space for Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples to confront a shared colonial condition. What does decolonization mean for Indigenous peoples? Is decolonization an implied promise to squash the tropes of coloniality? Or is it a way for non-Indigenous people to create another paradigm or site for their own resistance or transgression (...)
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  13.  33
    A Counter-Colonial Speculation on Elizabeth Rata’s –Ism.Carl Mika - 2016 - Journal of World Philosophies 1 (1):1-12.
    In Maori thought, the possibility exists for a sort of lateral thinking that does not necessarily directly respond to another’s utterance or opinion but that considers some of the creative and arbitrary themes that arise. In this article, I employ this counter-colonial speculation, keeping in mind a Maori worldview whilst thinking in the wake of Elizabeth Rata’s “Ethnic Ideologies in New Zealand Education: What’s Wrong with Kaupapa Maori?” The speculative powers that Maori have at our disposal here have undoubtedly been (...)
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  14.  6
    A Maori Il-Logical Ethics of the Dark: An Example with ‘Trauma’.Carl Mika - forthcoming - Tandf: Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-10.
  15.  5
    A Maori Il-Logical Ethics of the Dark: An Example with ‘Trauma’.Carl Mika - 2021 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 53 (5):426-435.
    Where has all the hilarity gone – and, with it, the ethics of the dark? In this article, I engage with our metaphysical entities of darkness and nothingness. Undermining and re-declaring are more than just pleasurable exercise for my own indigenous group – Maori; they are ethical necessities that keep one’s certainties in check. Whether it is agreeable or uncomfortable, this acknowledgement of those first beings is necessary if we are to avoid taking ourselves too seriously. I then consider one (...)
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  16.  25
    Blind, or Keenly Self-Regarding? The Dilemma of Western Philosophy.Carl Mika & Michael Peters - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (11):1125-1127.
  17.  16
    Novalis’ Poetic Uncertainty: A Bildung with the Absolute.Carl Mika - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (6).
    Novalis, the Early German Romantic poet and philosopher, had at the core of his work a mysterious depiction of the ‘absolute’. The absolute is Novalis’ name for a substance that defies precise knowledge yet calls for a tentative and sensitive speculation. How one asserts a truth, represents an object, and sets about encountering things in the world, is in the first instance the domain of the absolute, which diffuses through all things in the world. In this article, I begin by (...)
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  18.  10
    Subjecting Ourselves to Madness: A Maori Approach to Unseen Instruction.Carl Mika - 2021 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 53 (7):719-727.
    Where does the object or idea begin, and where does it end as ‘unseen’? There is scope in Maori philosophising to think of the seen object or its idea in various ways, including as materially constituting the self and the rest of the world; as incomplete for a mental representation; as constituted in itself by the unseen ; and as co-constitutional with nothingness and presence. The possibilities of the seen object are several, especially if the concept of ‘seen’ is understood (...)
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  19.  8
    Tawhiao’s Unstated Heteroglossia: Conversations with Bakhtin.Carl Te Hira Mika & Sarah-Jane Tiakiwai - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (9):854-866.
    In the face of land confiscations and other forms of imperialism characteristic of the 19th century in Aotearoa/new Zealand, the second Maori King Tawhiao devised a number of sayings that seem at first glance to be entirely mythical. Highly metaphorical and poetic, they appear to refer, as Bakhtin would have it in his discussion of the epic, to a language that is emotional, innately tied to a static mooring of pre-rational thought. Yet, in this paper we argue that a Maori (...)
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  20.  12
    What is Indigenous Research in Philosophy of Education? And What is PESA, From an Indigenous Perspective?Carl Mika, Georgina Stewart, Ka’imi Watson, Keola Silva, Brian Martin, Jacoba Matapo & Akata Galuvao - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):733-739.
  21.  22
    What is Philosophy for Indigenous People, in Relation to Education?Carl Mika & Georgina Stewart - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):744-746.
  22.  7
    The Case for Academic Plagiarism Education: A PESA Executive Collective Writing Project.Michael A. Peters, Liz Jackson, Ruyu Hung, Carl Mika, Rachel Anne Buchanan, Marek Tesar, Tina Besley, Nina Hood, Sean Sturm, Bernadette Farrell, Andrew Madjar & Taylor Webb - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-24.