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Carl N. Still [16]Carl Nelson Still [1]
  1. The Problem of Aquinas's Notion of Reditio Completa in Relation to its Neoplatonic Sources.Kevin Corrigan & Carl N. Still - 2004 - In Jeremiah Hackett, William E. Murnion & Carl N. Still (eds.), Being and Thought in Aquinas. Global Academic.
     
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  2. Being and Thought in Aquinas.Jeremiah Hackett, William E. Murnion & Carl N. Still (eds.) - 2004 - Global Academic.
  3. Essays in Medieval Theology and Philosophy in Memory of Walter H. Principe Fortresses and Launching Pads.Walter H. Principe, James R. Ginther & Carl N. Still - 2004
     
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  4.  5
    Aquinas on Human Self-Knowledge by Therese Scarpelli Cory.Carl N. Still - 2015 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (2):329-330.
  5.  25
    Aquinas on Self-Knowledge and the Individuation of Thought.Carl N. Still - 2014 - International Philosophical Quarterly 54 (3):253-264.
    Thomas Aquinas’s theory of self-knowledge stands out among medieval theories for its conceptual sophistication, yet it remains less studied than many other areas of his thought. Here I consider a significant philosophical critique of Aquinas on self-knowledge and respond to it. Anthony Kenny alleges that Aquinas does not sufficiently account for the individuation of thought in the knower. But Kenny’s analysis of how Aquinas individuates thought ironically confuses Aquinas’s account with that of Averroes, whose explanation Aquinas rejected. A closer reading (...)
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  6.  64
    Do We Know All After Death? Thomas Aquinas on the Disembodied Soul’s Knowledge.Carl N. Still - 2001 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 75:107-119.
    This paper examines Aquinas’s epistemological treatment of the disembodied soul in order to reveal (1) its relationship to the person it once was, and (2) the nature and extent of its self-knowledge. I argue first that disembodiment entails not only loss of personhood, but severe restriction of one’s concept of self. Consequently, individual self-consciousness is minimized. By contrast, I argue that the soul’s knowledge of its nature is likely to be realized more perfectly in the separated state, not so much (...)
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  7.  8
    Do We Know All After Death? Thomas Aquinas on the Disembodied Soul’s Knowledge.Carl N. Still - 2001 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 75:107-119.
    This paper examines Aquinas’s epistemological treatment of the disembodied soul in order to reveal its relationship to the person it once was, and the nature and extent of its self-knowledge. I argue first that disembodiment entails not only loss of personhood, but severe restriction of one’s concept of self. Consequently, individual self-consciousness is minimized. By contrast, I argue that the soul’s knowledge of its nature is likely to be realized more perfectly in the separated state, not so much because of (...)
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  8. Gifted Knowledge: An Exception to Thomistic Epistemology?Carl N. Still - 1999 - The Thomist 63 (2):173-190.
     
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  9.  7
    Intentionality, Cognition, and Mental Representation in Medieval Philosophy Ed. By Gyula Klima.Carl N. Still - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (2):337-338.
    The fifteen essays in this volume represent the state of the art when it comes to the contemporary study of medieval philosophy of mind. The contributors are well-established scholars in the field who build on their previous work, and most advance an original argument in these essays. The focus is on western Christian philosophers and theologians from the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries and “the intricacies and varieties of the conceptual relationships among intentionality, cognition, and mental representation” in their thought. As (...)
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  10.  1
    Infinite Minds: A Philosophical Cosmology. [REVIEW]Carl N. Still - 2003 - Review of Metaphysics 57 (1):154-154.
    In this book John Leslie presents Spinozistic pantheism in contemporary dress and argues for its compatibility with what we already know and believe. Building on his earlier work, Leslie now suggests that there may be infinitely many infinite minds each worth calling divine. The reader is invited to contemplate a universe along lines that fit a con temporary Spinozism, even if one begins with the suspicion that pantheism is bizarre or absurd.
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  11.  19
    John Buridan: Portrait of a Fourteenth-Century Arts Master by Jack Zupko. [REVIEW]Carl N. Still - 2003 - Dialogue 42 (4):832-834.
  12.  19
    John Buridan: Portrait of a Fourteenth-Century Arts Master. [REVIEW]Carl N. Still - 2003 - Dialogue 42 (4):832-834.
    There is a perception that among medieval philosophers John Buridan is one who, as he becomes better known, will be generally counted along with Abelard, Aquinas, Scotus, and Ockham as a philosopher of the first rank. Despite his being the most famous and influential philosopher of his time, Jack Zupko says that “the real impact of Buridan on western thought has yet to be appreciated”. As an editor, translator, and student of Buridan, Zupko is well suited to document this impact, (...)
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  13.  23
    Leslie, John. Infinite Minds: A Philosophical Cosmology.Carl N. Still - 2003 - Review of Metaphysics 57 (1):154-155.
  14.  12
    Marilyn McCord Adams , Some Later Medieval Theories of the Eucharist: Thomas Aquinas, Giles of Rome, Duns Scotus, and William Ockham . Reviewed By.Carl N. Still - 2011 - Philosophy in Review 31 (6):391-393.
  15. Pico's Quest for All Knowledge.Carl N. Still - 2008 - In M. V. Dougherty (ed.), Pico Della Mirandola: New Essays. Cambridge University Press.
  16.  22
    The Divine Sense: The Intellect in Patristic Theology (Review).Carl N. Still - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp. 135-136.
    Unless one already knows the phrase ‘The Divine Sense’, which Williams borrows from Origen , the reader might think that the intellect in question here is divine. But this book is as much about the human intellect as the divine. Williams approaches her subject through selective treatment of figures ranging from apostolic fathers to fifth-century monastic authors. Her first chapter deals with Justin, Irenaeus, and Tertullian, who presage later thought by their attention to human mind as mirror of the divine (...)
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