Results for 'Carleigh Krubiner'

6 found
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  1.  25
    Pregnant Women Should Not Be Categorised as a ‘Vulnerable Population’ in Biomedical Research Studies: Ending a Vicious Cycle of ‘Vulnerability’.Carleigh B. Krubiner & Ruth R. Faden - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (10):664-665.
    A new study published in Journal of Medical Ethics by van der Zande et al 1 further highlights why classifying pregnant women as a ‘vulnerable population’ in the context of research is deeply problematic. Because the designation of ‘vulnerable’ is otherwise applied to populations whose decision-making capacity about research participation is somehow compromised—such as children and adults of limited cognitive ability—many of us have been arguing for some time that using this designation for pregnant women is inappropriate and disrespectful.2–4 There (...)
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  2.  3
    Which Strings Attached: Ethical Considerations for Selecting Appropriate Conditionalities in Conditional Cash Transfer Programmes.Carleigh B. Krubiner & Maria W. Merritt - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (3):167-176.
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  3.  5
    Ethical Challenges in Designing and Implementing Health Systems Research: Experiences From the Field.Adnan Hyder & Carleigh Krubiner - 2016 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 7 (3):209-217.
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  4.  18
    Ethical Review of Health Systems Research in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Conceptual Exploration.Adnan A. Hyder, Abbas Rattani, Carleigh Krubiner, Abdulgafoor M. Bachani & Nhan T. Tran - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (2):28-37.
    Given that health systems research involves different aims, approaches, and methodologies as compared to more traditional clinical trials, the ethical issues present in HSR may be unique or particularly nuanced. This article outlines eight pertinent ethical issues that are particularly salient in HSR and argues that the ethical review process should be better tailored to ensure more efficient and appropriate oversight of HSR with adequate human protections, especially in low- and middle-income countries. The eight ethical areas we discuss include the (...)
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  5.  72
    Exploring the Ethics of Long-Term Research Engagement With Communities in Low- and Middle-Income Countries.A. A. Hyder, C. B. Krubiner, G. Bloom & A. Bhuiya - 2012 - Public Health Ethics 5 (3):252-262.
    Over the past few decades, there has been increasing attention focused on the ethics of health research, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Despite the increasing focus on the literature addressing human protection, community engagement, appropriate consent procedures and ways to mitigate concerns around exploitation, there has been little discussion about how the duration of the research engagement may affect the ethical design and implementation of studies. In other words, what are the unique ethical challenges when researchers engage with host (...)
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  6. Universal Health Coverage, Priority Setting and the Human Right to Health.Benedict Rumbold, Octavio Ferraz, Sarah Hawkes, Rachel Baker, Carleigh Crubiner, Peter Littlejohns, Ole Frithjof Norheim, Thomas Pegram, Annette Rid, Sridhar Venkatapuram, Alex Voorhoeve, Albert Weale, James Wilson, Alicia Ely Yamin & Daniel Wang - 2017 - The Lancet 390 (10095):712-14.
    As health policy-makers around the world seek to make progress towards universal health coverage, they must navigate between two important ethical imperatives: to set national spending priorities fairly and efficiently; and to safeguard the right to health. These imperatives can conflict, leading some to conclude that rights-based approaches present a disruptive influence on health policy, hindering states’ efforts to set priorities fairly and efficiently. Here, we challenge this perception. We argue first that these points of tension stem largely from inadequate (...)
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