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  1.  50
    Spinoza on Philosophy and Religion: The Averroistic Sources.Carlos Fraenkel - 2011 - In Smith Justin & Fraenkel Carlos (eds.), The Rationalists. Springer/Synthese. pp. 27--43.
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  2.  20
    Philosophical Religions From Plato to Spinoza: Reason, Religion, and Autonomy.Carlos Fraenkel - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Many pagan, Jewish, Christian and Muslim philosophers from Antiquity to the Enlightenment made no meaningful distinction between philosophy and religion. Instead they advocated a philosophical religion, arguing that God is Reason and that the historical forms of a religious tradition serve as philosophy's handmaid to promote the life of reason among non-philosophers. Carlos Fraenkel provides the first account of this concept and traces its history back to Plato. He shows how Jews and Christians appropriated it in Antiquity, follows it through (...)
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  3.  91
    Maimonides and Spinoza as Sources for Maimon's Solution of the “Problem Quid Juris” in Kant's Theory of Knowledge.Carlos Fraenkel - 2009 - Kant-Studien 100 (2):212-240.
    Maimon once described the philosophical project underlying his Essay on Transcendental Philosophy as an attempt “to unify Kantian philosophy with Spinozism”. But in the only reference to Spinoza in the Essay, he stresses that Spinoza was not the source of his argument. In this paper I will argue that, notwithstanding the disclaimer, Maimon's solution for the problems that in his view haunted Kant's theory of knowledge was indeed significantly influenced by Spinoza, as well as by the medieval Jewish Aristotelian Maimonides. (...)
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  4.  18
    Theocracy and Autonomy in Medieval Islamic and Jewish Philosophy.Carlos Fraenkel - 2010 - Political Theory 38 (3):340-366.
    According to both contemporary intuitions and scholarly opinion, autonomy is something specifically modern. It is certainly taken to be incompatible with religions like Islam and Judaism, if these are invested with political power. Both religions are seen as centered on a divine Law (sharî'a, viz., torah) which prescribes what we may and may not do, promising reward for obedience and threatening punishment for disobedience. Not we, but God makes the rules. This picture is in important ways misleading. There is, I (...)
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  5.  17
    Philosophy and Exegesis in Al-Fârâbî, Averroes, and Maimonides.Carlos Fraenkel - 2008 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 64 (1):105-125.
    À plusieurs égards, il est vrai d’avancer que Maïmonide et Averroès poursuivent le même projet philosophique et religieux. D’autant plus que tous deux ont été décrits comme des disciples d’al-Fârâbî, le fondateur de l’école de l’aristotélisme arabe . Cependant, à première vue, leur oeuvre ne pouvait pas être moins ressemblante: Averroès n’a écrit presque exclusivement que des commentaires sur Aristote, cependant que Maïmonide n’est l’auteur d’aucune oeuvre qui appartienne à un genre philosophique dans le sens strict. Il est, d’un autre (...)
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  6.  34
    Spinoza on Miracles and the Truth of the Bible.Carlos Fraenkel - 2013 - Journal of the History of Ideas 74 (4):643-658.
  7.  67
    Maimonides' God and Spinoza's Deus Sive Natura.Carlos Fraenkel - 2006 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (2):169-215.
    In this paper I explain how Spinoza's ontological monism is related to the monotheism of a distinct tradition in medieval Aristotelianism exemplified by Maimonides. My main contention is that Maimonides' God, conceived as intellectual activity has the same structure as Spinoza's Deus sive Natura. The main difference between them is that Maimonides' God is confined to cognitive activity, whereas Spinoza's God is extensive activity as well. I trace the impact of the medieval doctrine of God on Spinoza's thought from the (...)
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  8.  84
    Maimonides' God and Spinoza's.Carlos Fraenkel - 2006 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (2).
    : In this paper I explain how Spinoza's ontological monism is related to the monotheism of a distinct tradition in medieval Aristotelianism exemplified by Maimonides. My main contention is that Maimonides' God, conceived as intellectual activity has the same structure as Spinoza's Deus sive Natura. The main difference between them is that Maimonides' God is confined to cognitive activity, whereas Spinoza's God is extensive activity as well. I trace the impact of the medieval doctrine of God on Spinoza's thought from (...)
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  9. Could Spinoza Have Presented the Ethics as the True Content of the Bible?Carlos Fraenkel, D. Garber & S. Nadler - 2008 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 4:1-50.
     
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  10. Beyond the Faithful Disciple Samuel Ibn Tibbon's Criticism of Maimonides.Carlos Fraenkel - 2007 - In Jay Michael Harris (ed.), Maimonides After 800 Years: Essays on Maimonides and His Influence. Harvard University Press.
  11.  19
    The Rationalists: Between Tradition and Innovation.Carlos Fraenkel, Dario Perinetti & Justin Smith (eds.) - 2011 - Springer.
    This volume draws a balanced picture of the Rationalists by bringing their intellectual contexts, sources and full range of interests into sharper focus, without neglecting their core commitment to the epistemological doctrine that earned ...
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