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  1. ‘You Look Terrific!’ Social Evaluation and Relationships in Online Compliments.Antonio García-Gómez & Carmen Maíz-Arévalo - 2013 - Discourse Studies 15 (6):735-760.
    Despite its apparent simplicity, the speech act of complimenting has received a great deal of attention in the literature. However, studies have mostly focused on compliments’ realization in face-to-face conversational exchanges, while they have often been neglected in other channels such as online communication. This article is intended to redress the balance in support of online exchanges. More specifically, we aim to investigate how users of online social networks like Facebook use compliments to evaluate others and strengthen social rapport in (...)
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    Expressive Speech Acts in Educational E-Chats.Carmen Maíz-Arévalo - 2017 - Pragmática Sociocultural 5 (2):151-178.
    The category of expressive speech acts has traditionally proven elusive of definition in contrast to other types of speech acts. This might explain why this group of speech acts has been less researched. The present paper aims to redress this imbalance by analysing the expressive speech acts performed by two groups of university students in two educational chats, carried out in English or in Spanish, respectively. The main purpose of the study is to find out if students express their emotions (...)
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  3. Gender-Based Differences on Spanish Conversational Exchanges: The Role of the Follow-Up Move.Carmen Maíz-Arévalo - 2011 - Discourse Studies 13 (6):687-724.
    The aim of this article is to analyse Spanish conversational structure, more concretely, to investigate in depth the role of the third move, or follow-up, outside classroom discourse. Since first introduced by Sinclair and Coulthard, the follow-up move has attracted a great deal of attention, as proved by numerous studies. However, these studies have mostly focused on English while Spanish has been neglected. The present study intends to fill in this gap by analysing a corpus of 50 conversational exchanges in (...)
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