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  1. Nature and role of codes and other ethics directives.Carol Mason Spicer - 1995 - Encyclopedia of Bioethics 5:2605-2612.
     
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  2.  13
    In Honor of LeRoy Walters: Introduction from the Editors.Eric M. Meslin, Eric T. Juengst & Carol Mason Spicer - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 29 (1):67-95.
    Since the birth of bioethics, a persistent refrain has been that advances in science, technology, and health are occurring so quickly that they threaten to outpace society’s ability to understand and react to them. Genomics, big data, and synthetic biology preoccupy current scholarly and policy debates, just as organ transplantation, in vitro fertilization, human subjects research, and gene therapy did over the past forty years. But the history of bioethics is more than the topics it has addressed. It is also (...)
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    Fallout from Government-Sponsored Radiation Research.Carol Mason Spicer - 1994 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 4 (2):147-154.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Fallout from Government-Sponsored Radiation ResearchCarol Mason Spicer (bio)On December 28, 1993, Energy Secretary Hazel R. O'Leary publicly appealed to both the executive and legislative branches of the United States Government to consider compensation for individuals who were harmed by their exposure to ionizing radiation while enrolled in government-sponsored studies conducted between 1940 and the early 1970s.1 The call for compensation was issued three weeks after Secretary O'Leary disclosed that (...)
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    Federal oversight and regulation of human subjects research---an update.Carol Mason Spicer - 2000 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 10 (3):261-264.
  5.  32
    Introduction.Carol Mason Spicer - 1996 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 6 (4):ix-x.
    Epistemologists, like other philosophers, sometimes try to convince us of the truth of their claims about the nature of knowledge by appeals to our epistemic intuitions. Sometimes intuitions are gathered and deployed against an epistemological theory: as, for example, when our intuitive judgement that the subject in a Gettier case fails to know what he justifiably and truly believes is used to undermine the view that knowledge is justified true belief. Othertimes intuitions are gathered and deployed in support of an (...)
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  6. Project MUSE Journals Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal Volume 5, Number 4, December 1995 Instructions to Authors.Carol Mason Spicer - 1995 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 5 (4).
     
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