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Carol Weil [3]Carol J. Weil [1]
  1.  45
    Broad Consent for Research With Biological Samples: Workshop Conclusions.Christine Grady, Lisa Eckstein, Ben Berkman, Dan Brock, Robert Cook-Deegan, Stephanie M. Fullerton, Hank Greely, Mats G. Hansson, Sara Hull, Scott Kim, Bernie Lo, Rebecca Pentz, Laura Rodriguez, Carol Weil, Benjamin S. Wilfond & David Wendler - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (9):34-42.
    Different types of consent are used to obtain human biospecimens for future research. This variation has resulted in confusion regarding what research is permitted, inadvertent constraints on future research, and research proceeding without consent. The National Institutes of Health Clinical Center's Department of Bioethics held a workshop to consider the ethical acceptability of addressing these concerns by using broad consent for future research on stored biospecimens. Multiple bioethics scholars, who have written on these issues, discussed the reasons for consent, the (...)
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  2.  58
    A Review of OHRP Compliance Oversight Letters. [REVIEW]Kristina Borror, Michael Carome, Patrick McNeilly & Carol Weil - 2003 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 25 (5):1-4.
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  3.  5
    Development of a Consensus Approach for Return of Pathology Incidental Findings in the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) Project.Nicole C. Lockhart, Carol J. Weil, Latarsha J. Carithers, Susan E. Koester, A. Roger Little, Simona Volpi, Helen M. Moore & Benjamin E. Berkman - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (9):643-645.
    The active debate about the return of incidental or secondary findings in research has primarily focused on return to research participants, or in some cases, family members. Particular attention has been paid to return of genomic findings. Yet, research may generate other types of findings that warrant consideration for return, including findings related to the pathology of donated biospecimens. In the case of deceased biospecimen donors who are also organ and/or tissue transplant donors, pathology incidental findings may be relevant not (...)
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