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  1.  18
    Developing and Revising the Canadian Code of Ethics for Psychologists: Key Differences From the American Psychological Association Code.Carole Sinclair - 2020 - Ethics and Behavior 30 (4):249-263.
    ABSTRACTThere are several key differences between the codes of ethics developed by the American Psychological Association and the Canadian Psychological Association. This paper tells the story behind the key differences between the U.S. and Canada codes. It starts with an introduction to the two countries and a brief history of what led up to the American Psychological Association’s decision to develop the world’s first ethics code for psychologists. This is followed by a description of the development process used by APA, (...)
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  2.  25
    Societal-Level Ethical Responsibilities Regarding Active Euthanasia: An Analysis Using the Universal Declaration of Ethical Principles for Psychologists.Carole Sinclair - 2020 - Ethics and Behavior 30 (1):14-27.
    Using the Universal Declaration of Ethical Principles for Psychologists as an ethical framework, some of the major successes, challenges and needs that psychology has regarding its responsibilities to society in the area of end-of-life decision making and active euthanasia are outlined in this paper. Four particular responsibilities are highlighted: increase professional and scientific knowledge; use psychological knowledge for beneficial purposes; adequately train its members: and encourage beneficial social structures and policies. For each responsibility, some of the major societal-level ethical issues (...)
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    Integrating Emotion and Other Nonrational Factors Into Ethics Education and Training in Professional Psychology.Yesim Korkut & Carole Sinclair - 2020 - Ethics and Behavior 30 (6):444-458.
    ABSTRACT Any professional or scientific discipline has a responsibility to do what it can to ensure ethical behavior on the part of its members. In this context, this paper outlines and explores the criticism that to date the emphasis in ethics training in professional psychology, as with other disciplines, has been on the rational elements of ethical decision making, with insufficient attention to the role of emotions and other nonrational elements. After a brief outline of some of the historical background (...)
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