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Caroline Ong
Loyola University, Chicago
  1. Legalising Euthanasia for Children: Dying with 'Dignity' or Killing the Vulnerable?Caroline Ong - 2014 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 20 (1):5.
    Ong, Caroline In February 2014, the Belgian parliament passed an amendment to the Belgian Act on Euthanasia of May 28th, 2002 removing the age limit of those requesting euthanasia provided that they have discerning capabilities and their parents approve. After mentioning briefly the arguments against legalising euthanasia, this article questions the ethical validity of removing the age limit, as well as the presumption that ending lives prematurely allows people to die with dignity. Caring for people who are vulnerable in their (...)
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  2. Suffering and the Healing Art of Medicine.Caroline Ong - 2015 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 21 (1):6.
    Ong, Caroline Whilst the reason and purpose of suffering may never be fully understood, there are ways of enduring, transcending and growing resilience to how it affects us. Our experience of suffering lies in the web of perceptions that involve our physical, spiritual and cosmological beliefs. Referencing Pain Seeking Understanding: Suffering, Medicine and Faith, edited by Margaret E. Mohrmann and Mark J. Hanson, this article gives a brief exploration of some propositions as to why an all-powerful, good God would allow (...)
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  3. Moral Distress.Caroline Ong - 2015 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 20 (4):12.
    Ong, Caroline As health systems become more complex, moral distress is increasingly being recognised as a significant phenomenon amongst health professionals. It can be described as the state of being distressed when one is unable to act according to what one believes to be morally right. It may compromise patient care, the health professional involved and the organisation. Cumulative experiences of incompletely resolved moral distress - a phenomenon which is called moral residue - may leave us susceptible to more frequent (...)
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  4. When Life is Ending..Caroline Ong - 2014 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 20 (2):5.
    Ong, Caroline In the debate about euthanasia, it is important that we consider all views, including those which might not at first seem attractive to us. Whether we believe in God or not, the views of the Catholic Church make a significant contribution to this debate. The Church does not support the deliberate killing either of oneself or another person. It also emphasises our moral obligation to respect life and to uphold the dignity of each person.
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  5. Preventing the Sexual Transmission of HIV/AIDS.Caroline Ong - 2014 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 19 (4):4.
    Ong, Caroline There was once a strong belief amongst global HIV/AIDS organisations that the key to the prevention of the sexual transmission of HIV was condom use. Other measures such as abstinence and being loyal to one partner were seen as beneficial, but secondary. Thirty years later, the evidence is mounting that behavioural change is much more effective in halting the spread of HIV than condoms.
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  6.  17
    When Life is Ending Booklet Release.Caroline Ong - 2017 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 22 (3):5.
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