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Caroline F. Rowland [16]Caroline Rowland [6]
  1.  20
    The development of abstract syntax: Evidence from structural priming and the lexical boost.Caroline F. Rowland, Franklin Chang, Ben Ambridge, Julian M. Pine & Elena Vm Lieven - 2012 - Cognition 125 (1):49-63.
  2.  7
    The effect of verb semantic class and verb frequency (entrenchment) on children’s and adults’ graded judgements of argument-structure overgeneralization errors.Ben Ambridge, Julian M. Pine, Caroline F. Rowland & Chris R. Young - 2008 - Cognition 106 (1):87-129.
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  3.  23
    Explaining errors in children’s questions.Caroline F. Rowland - 2007 - Cognition 104 (1):106-134.
    The ability to explain the occurrence of errors in children's speech is an essential component of successful theories of language acquisition. The present study tested some generativist and constructivist predictions about error on the questions produced by ten English-learning children between 2 and 5 years of age. The analyses demonstrated that, as predicted by some generativist theories [e.g. Santelmann, L., Berk, S., Austin, J., Somashekar, S. & Lust. B. (2002). Continuity and development in the acquisition of inversion in yes/no questions: (...)
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  4.  8
    Comprehension of Argument Structure and Semantic Roles: Evidence from English-Learning Children and the Forced-Choice Pointing Paradigm.Claire H. Noble, Caroline F. Rowland & Julian M. Pine - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (5):963-982.
    Research using the intermodal preferential looking paradigm (IPLP) has consistently shown that English‐learning children aged 2 can associate transitive argument structure with causal events. However, studies using the same methodology investigating 2‐year‐old children’s knowledge of the conjoined agent intransitive and semantic role assignment have reported inconsistent findings. The aim of the present study was to establish at what age English‐learning children have verb‐general knowledge of both transitive and intransitive argument structure using a new method: the forced‐choice pointing paradigm. The results (...)
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  5.  11
    Semantics versus statistics in the retreat from locative overgeneralization errors.Ben Ambridge, Julian M. Pine & Caroline F. Rowland - 2012 - Cognition 123 (2):260-279.
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  6.  6
    Do the Eyes Have It? A Systematic Review on the Role of Eye Gaze in Infant Language Development.Melis Çetinçelik, Caroline F. Rowland & Tineke M. Snijders - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Eye gaze is a ubiquitous cue in child–caregiver interactions, and infants are highly attentive to eye gaze from very early on. However, the question of why infants show gaze-sensitive behavior, and what role this sensitivity to gaze plays in their language development, is not yet well-understood. To gain a better understanding of the role of eye gaze in infants' language learning, we conducted a broad systematic review of the developmental literature for all studies that investigate the role of eye gaze (...)
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  7.  11
    Is Passive Syntax Semantically Constrained? Evidence From Adult Grammaticality Judgment and Comprehension Studies.Ben Ambridge, Amy Bidgood, Julian M. Pine, Caroline F. Rowland & Daniel Freudenthal - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (6):1435-1459.
    To explain the phenomenon that certain English verbs resist passivization, Pinker proposed a semantic constraint on the passive in the adult grammar: The greater the extent to which a verb denotes an action where a patient is affected or acted upon, the greater the extent to which it is compatible with the passive. However, a number of comprehension and production priming studies have cast doubt upon this claim, finding no difference between highly affecting agent-patient/theme-experiencer passives and non-actional experiencer theme passives. (...)
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  8.  19
    A Semantics‐Based Approach to the “No Negative Evidence” Problem.Ben Ambridge, Julian M. Pine, Caroline F. Rowland, Rebecca L. Jones & Victoria Clark - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (7):1301-1316.
    Previous studies have shown that children retreat from argument‐structure overgeneralization errors (e.g., *Don’t giggle me) by inferring that frequently encountered verbs are unlikely to be grammatical in unattested constructions, and by making use of syntax‐semantics correspondences (e.g., verbs denoting internally caused actions such as giggling cannot normally be used causatively). The present study tested a new account based on a unitary learning mechanism that combines both of these processes. Seventy‐two participants (ages 5–6, 9–10, and adults) rated overgeneralization errors with higher (...)
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  9.  6
    The acquisition of questions with long-distance dependencies.Ewa Dąbrowska, Caroline Rowland & Anna Theakston - 2009 - Cognitive Linguistics 20 (3).
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  10.  7
    Is Structure Dependence an Innate Constraint? New Experimental Evidence From Children's Complex-Question Production.Ben Ambridge, Caroline F. Rowland & Julian M. Pine - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (1):222-255.
  11.  21
    Children use verb semantics to retreat from overgeneralization errors: A novel verb grammaticality judgment study.Ben Ambridge, Julian M. Pine & Caroline F. Rowland - 2011 - Cognitive Linguistics 22 (2):303-323.
    Whilst certain verbs may appear in both the intransitive inchoative and the transitive causative constructions (The ball rolled/The man rolled the ball), others may appear in only the former (The man laughed/*The joke laughed the man). Some accounts argue that children acquire these restrictions using only (or mainly) statistical learning mechanisms such as entrenchment and pre-emption. Others have argued that verb semantics are also important. To test these competing accounts, adults (Experiment 1) and children aged 5–6 and 9–10 (Experiment 2) (...)
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  12.  4
    Aligning Developmental and Processing Accounts of Implicit and Statistical Learning.Michelle S. Peter & Caroline F. Rowland - 2019 - Topics in Cognitive Science 11 (3):555-572.
    In this article, Peter and Rowland explore the role of implicit statistical learning in syntactic development. It is often accepted that the processes observed in classic implicit learning or statistical learning experiments play an important role in the acquisition of natural language syntax. As Peter and Rowland point out, however, the results from neither research strand can be used to fully explain how children's syntax becomes adult‐like. They propose to address this shortcoming by using the structural priming paradigm.
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  13.  18
    The acquisition of auxiliary syntax: BE and HAVE.Anna L. Theakston, Elena V. M. Lieven, Julian M. Pine & Caroline F. Rowland - 2005 - Cognitive Linguistics 16 (1):247-277.
    This study examined patterns of auxiliary provision and omission for the auxiliaries BE and HAVE in a longitudinal data set from 11 children between the ages of two and three years. Four possible explanations for auxiliary omission—a lack of lexical knowledge, performance limitations in production, the Optional Infinitive hypothesis, and patterns of auxiliary use in the input—were examined. The data suggest that although none of these accounts provides a full explanation for the pattern of auxiliary use and nonuse observed in (...)
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  14.  9
    Leadership, Pragmatism and Grace: A Review.Mike Thomas & Caroline Rowland - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (1):99-111.
    Leadership takes a central role in the public affairs agenda. This article is a review of published works on leadership focusing on the concept of grace. It discusses the role of compassion and kindness in current leadership theory and practice and whether these attributes have value in sustainable models. Findings indicate that there is conceptual confusion regarding the definition of compassion and its application in leadership practices. Kindness is not discussed within the concept of compassion and kindness itself may be (...)
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  15.  13
    Prediction in processing is a by-product of language learning.Franklin Chang, Evan Kidd & Caroline F. Rowland - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):350-351.
    Both children and adults predict the content of upcoming language, suggesting that prediction is useful for learning as well as processing. We present an alternative model which can explain prediction behaviour as a by-product of language learning. We suggest that a consideration of language acquisition places important constraints on Pickering & Garrod's (P&G's) theory.
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  16.  6
    Predicting children's errors with negative questions: Testing a schema-combination account.Ben Ambridge & Caroline F. Rowland - 2009 - Cognitive Linguistics 20 (2).
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  17.  5
    A Comprehensive Examination of Prediction‐Based Error as a Mechanism for Syntactic Development: Evidence From Syntactic Priming.Seamus Donnelly, Caroline Rowland, Franklin Chang & Evan Kidd - 2024 - Cognitive Science 48 (4):e13431.
    Prediction-based accounts of language acquisition have the potential to explain several different effects in child language acquisition and adult language processing. However, evidence regarding the developmental predictions of such accounts is mixed. Here, we consider several predictions of these accounts in two large-scale developmental studies of syntactic priming of the English dative alternation. Study 1 was a cross-sectional study (N = 140) of children aged 3−9 years, in which we found strong evidence of abstract priming and the lexical boost, but (...)
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  18.  10
    Children's comprehension of sentences with focus particles.Kevin B. Paterson, Simon P. Liversedge, Caroline Rowland & Ruth Filik - 2003 - Cognition 89 (3):263-294.
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  19.  13
    Syntactic Representations Are Both Abstract and Semantically Constrained: Evidence From Children’s and Adults’ Comprehension and Production/Priming of the English Passive.Amy Bidgood, Julian M. Pine, Caroline F. Rowland & Ben Ambridge - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (9):e12892.
    All accounts of language acquisition agree that, by around age 4, children’s knowledge of grammatical constructions is abstract, rather than tied solely to individual lexical items. The aim of the present research was to investigate, focusing on the passive, whether children’s and adults’ performance is additionally semantically constrained, varying according to the distance between the semantics of the verb and those of the construction. In a forced‐choice pointing study (Experiment 1), both 4‐ to 6‐year olds (N = 60) and adults (...)
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  20.  7
    Vocabulary of 2-year-olds learning English and an additional language: norms and effects of linguistic distance. II: Methods.Caroline Floccia, Thomas Sambrook, Claire Delle Luche, Rosa Kwok, Jeremy Goslin, Laurence White, Allegra Cattani, Emily Sullivan, Kirsten Abbot-Smith, Andrea Krott, Debbie Mills, Caroline Rowland, Judit Gervain & Kim Plunkett - unknown
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  21.  7
    Developmental psycholinguistics teaches us that we need multi-method, not single-method, approaches to the study of linguistic representation.Caroline F. Rowland & Padraic Monaghan - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  22.  1
    Introduction.Anna Theakston & Caroline Rowland - 2009 - Cognitive Linguistics 20 (3).
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