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  1.  50
    Compliance and Non-Compliance with International Human Rights Standards: Overplaying the Cultural. [REVIEW]Caroline Walsh - 2010 - Human Rights Review 11 (1):45-64.
    This paper interrogates a ‘positive’ view of culture’s (potential) role in widening compliance with international human rights standards, which (1) concentrates on the ‘cultural’ bases of conflict over rights and, in consequence, (2) focuses primarily on cultural interpretation as a means of achieving greater respect for rights norms. The thrust of the paper is that the relationship between culture and human rights norms is much more complex than this positive perspective implies and, this being so, that some of its claims (...)
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  2.  20
    Rawls and Walzer on Non-Domestic Justice.Caroline Walsh - 2007 - Contemporary Political Theory 6 (4):419-436.
    This article illuminates the relationship between John Rawls' and Michael Walzer's accounts of non-domestic justice by tracing its connection to their domestic relationship. More precisely, it places the celebrated positional shifts that characterize the latter within the context of the fundamental justificatory tension between their projects which endures: reason vs trust; and then juxtaposes this justificatory tension and their non-domestic political prescriptions. Such contextualization is important to the clarification of the pair's non-domestic relationship since it enables the observation that despite (...)
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  3.  15
    Recognition and Redistribution in Theories of Justice Beyond the State.Shane O'Neill & Caroline Walsh - 2009 - European Journal of Political Theory 8 (1):123-135.
    We consider here how cultural and socioeconomic dimensions of justice beyond the state are related. First we examine cosmopolitan theories that have drawn on John Rawls's egalitarian liberal framework to argue that a just global order requires substantive, transnational redistribution of material resources. We then assess the view, ironically put forward by Rawls himself, that this perspective is ethnocentric and insufficiently tolerant of non-liberal cultures. We argue that Rawls is right to be concerned about the danger of ethnocentrism, but wrong (...)
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