7 found
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  1. The Legal and Ethical Implications of Therapeutic Privilege – is It Ever Justified to Withhold Treatment Information From a Competent Patient?Carolyn Johnston & Genevieve Holt - 2006 - Clinical Ethics 1 (3):146-151.
    This article examines the standard of disclosure, set by law, of risks of treatment and alternative procedures that should normally be disclosed to patients. Therapeutic privilege has been recognized by the courts as an exception to this standard of disclosure. It provides a justification for withholding such information from competent patients in the interests of patient welfare. The article explores whether this justification is either legally or ethically defensible. In assessing patient welfare, the health care professional is required to consider (...)
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  2.  9
    King’s College London Student Clinical Ethics Committee Case Discussion: A Family Requests That Their Grandmother, Who Does Not Speak English, is Not Informed of Her Terminal Diagnosis.Carolyn Johnston, Michael Baty & Sky Liu - 2016 - Clinical Ethics 11 (1):38-41.
    Members of the Student Clinical Ethics Committee discussed the ethical and legal issues arising in a case referred for consideration – the family of a very elderly non-English speaking Asian lady did not want her to be informed that she had incurable lymphoma. The case study summarises the reflections of the Committee and focusses on: the role of cultural norms in healthcare decision making; the extent to which the views of the family about what is best for the patient should (...)
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  3.  13
    How Medical Students Learn Ethics: An Online Log of Their Learning Experiences.Carolyn Johnston & Jonathan Mok - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (10):854-858.
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  4.  19
    The Weight Attributed to Patient Values in Determining Best Interests.Carolyn Johnston - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):562-564.
    In W v M and Others (Re M) the Court of Protection considered whether withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration was in the best interests of a person in minimally conscious state. The Mental Capacity Act 2005 states that in determining best interests the decision-maker must consider, so far as is reasonably ascertainable, the patient's wishes, feelings, beliefs and values. Baker J. indicated that a high level of specificity is required in order to attribute significant weight to these factors. It (...)
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  5.  23
    The Mental Capacity Act 2005 and Advance Decisions.Carolyn Johnston - 2007 - Clinical Ethics 2 (2):80-84.
    This article considers the provisions of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 in respect of advance decisions. It considers the new statutory regulation of advance directives (termed 'advance decisions' in the Act) and the formalities necessary to effect an advance decision purporting to refuse life-sustaining treatment. The validity and applicability of advance decisions is discussed with analogy to case law and the clinician's reasonable belief in following an advance decision is considered. The article assesses the new personal welfare Lasting Powers of (...)
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  6.  15
    King’s College London Student Clinical Ethics Committee Case Discussion: Is It Appropriate to Insert a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy for an Elderly Man Who has Already Pulled Out a Naso-Gastric Tube?Carolyn Johnston, Michael Baty & Greg Dollman - 2015 - Clinical Ethics 10 (1-2):37-40.
    Members of the Student Clinical Ethics Committee discussed whether tube feeding should be instigated for a man who had indicated through his actions that he may be refusing it, although his family stated that he would have wanted to be kept alive in such a situation. The Committee considered the key issues of capacity and best interests, which in this case were confounded by lack of clarity about whether the patient’s actions amounted to a valid refusal of life sustaining treatment, (...)
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  7.  15
    King’s College London Student Clinical Ethics Committee Case Discussion: A Patient Changes Her Mind About Surgery – Should Her Later Refusal Be Respected?Carolyn Johnston, Michael Baty & Comfort Adewole - 2015 - Clinical Ethics 10 (1-2):34-36.
    Members of the Student Clinical Ethics Committee discussed the ethical and legal issues arising in a case referred for consideration – a female patient in her mid-60s, who had a very long history of multiple sclerosis, withdrew her previous consent to treatment following discussion with her son. The case study summarises the reflections of the Committee and focusses on: the meaning and practical application of respect for patient autonomy; whether a refusal of clinically indicated treatment may challenge the notion of (...)
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