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Carolyn Korsmeyer [63]Carolyn W. Korsmeyer [2]Carolyn Wilker Korsmeyer [2]Carolyn Korsmeyer [1]
  1. Visceral Values: Aurel Kolnai on Disgust.Carolyn Korsmeyer & Barry Smith - 2004 - In Barry Smith & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.), Aurel Kolnai's On Disgust. Open Court Publishing Company. pp. 1-23.
    In 1929 when Aurel Kolnai published his essay “On Disgust” in Husserl's ]ahrbuch he could truly assert that disgust was a "sorely neglected" topic. Now, however, this situation is changing as philosophers, psychologists, and historians of culture are turning their attention not only to emotions in general but more specifically to the large and disturbing set of aversive emotions, including disgust. We here provide an account of Kolnai’s contribution to the study of the phenomenon of disgust, of his general theory (...)
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  2.  13
    Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics "Introduction".Carolyn Korsmeyer (ed.) - 1995 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics takes a fresh look at the history of aesthetics and at current debates within the philosophy of art by exploring the ways in which gender informs notions of art and creativity, evaluation and interpretation, and concepts of aesthetic value. Multiple intellectual traditions have formed this field, and the discussions herein range from consideration of eighteenth century legacies of ideas about taste, beauty, and sublimity to debates about the relevance of postmodern analyses for feminist aesthetics. Forward (...)
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  3. Making Sense of Taste: Food & Philosophy.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1999 - Cornell University Press.
     
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  4.  23
    Savoring Disgust: The Foul and the Fair in Aesthetics.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    What is disgust? -- Attractive aversions -- Delightful, delicious, disgusting -- Varieties of aesthetic disgust -- The magnetism of disgust -- Hearts -- The foul and the fair.
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  5.  21
    On Disgust.Aurel Kolnai, Barry Smith & Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2004 - Open Court.
    The problem of disgust has until recently been neglected in the scientific literature. In comparison to the scientific (psychological and metaphysical) interest that has been applied to hatred, anxiety, and similar phenomena, disgust — although a common and important factor in our emotional life — has been unexplored, or it has been viewed as a “higher degree of dislike,” as “nausea,” or as a phenomenon of the “repression of urges.” We here show how the feeling of disgust possesses a unique (...)
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  6.  18
    Comment: Kolnai's Disgust.Carolyn Korsmeyer & Barry Smith - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (3):219-220.
    In his The Meaning of Disgust, Colin McGinn employs elements of the phenomenological theory of disgust advanced by Aurel Kolnai in 1929. Kolnai’s treatment of what he calls “material” disgust and of its primary elicitors—putrefying organic matter, bodily wastes and secretions, sticky contaminants, vermin—anticipates more recent scientific treatments of this emotion as a mode of protective recoil. While Nina Strohminger charges McGinn with neglecting such scientific studies, we here attempt to show how Kolnai goes beyond experimental findings in his careful (...)
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  7. On the "Aesthetic Senses" and the Development of Fine Arts.Carolyn W. Korsmeyer - 1975 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 34 (1):67-71.
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  8.  7
    Making Sense of Taste: Food and Philosophy.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2001 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (4):421-423.
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  9. Introduction.Peggy Zeglin Brand & Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1990 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 48 (4):277-280.
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  10.  5
    Aesthetics in Feminist Perspective.Hilde Hein & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.) - 1993 - Indiana University Press.
    "A first-rate introduction to the field, accessible to scholars working from a variety of disciplinary and theoretical perspectives. Highly recommended... " —Choice "... offers both broad theoretical considerations and applications to specific art forms, diverse methodological perspectives, and healthy debate among the contributors.... [an] outstanding volume."—Philosophy and Literature "... this volume represents an eloquent and enlightened attempt to reconceptualize the field of aesthetic theory by encouraging its tendencies toward openness, self-reflexivity and plurality." —Discourse & Society "All of the authors challenge (...)
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  11. Savoring Disgust: The Foul and the Fair in Aesthetics.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2011 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Disgust is among the strongest of aversions, characterized by involuntary physical recoil and even nausea. Yet paradoxically, disgusting objects can sometimes exert a grisly allure, and this emotion can constitute a positive, appreciative aesthetic response when exploited by works of art -- a phenomenon labelled here "aesthetic disgust." While the reactive, visceral quality of disgust contributes to its misleading reputation as a relatively "primitive" response mechanism, it is this feature that also gives it a particular aesthetic power when manifest in (...)
     
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  12.  90
    Gender and Aesthetics: An Introduction.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2004 - Routledge.
    Feminist approaches to art are extremely influential and widely studied across a variety of disciplines, including art theory, cultural and visual studies, and philosophy. Gender and Aesthetics is an introduction to the major theories and thinkers within art and aesthetics from a philosophical perspective, carefully introducing and examining the role that gender plays in forming ideas about art. It is ideal for anyone coming to the topic for the first time. Organized thematically, the book introduces in clear language the most (...)
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  13.  65
    Delightful, Delicious, Disgusting.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2002 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (3):217–225.
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  14.  76
    Hume and the Foundations of Taste.Carolyn W. Korsmeyer - 1976 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 35 (2):201-215.
  15.  31
    Aesthetic Deception: On Encounters with the Past.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (2):117–127.
  16. Terrible Beauties.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2006 - In Matthew Kieran (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art. Blackwell. pp. 51--63.
     
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  17.  9
    Real Old Things.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2016 - British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (3):219-231.
    Although we experience many cultural artifacts by way of reproductions, there remains a particular thrill in experiencing genuine objects—‘real things’. I argue that genuineness is a property that possesses many dimensions of value, including aesthetic value. Typically, aesthetic qualities are perceptual, but genuineness is not a perceptual property. I investigate the aesthetic dimensions of genuineness by considering the role of touch in encounters with old things, using the example of an ancient bronze figurine whose reputation as genuine has waxed and (...)
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  18.  73
    The Eclipse of Truth in the Rise of Aesthetics.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1989 - British Journal of Aesthetics 29 (4):293-302.
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  19.  49
    The Turn to the Body.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2010 - The Philosophers' Magazine 50 (50):74-75.
    The sense of taste falls low on the hierarchy of the senses because it seems a poor conduit for knowledge of the external world; it directs attention inward rather than outward; its pleasures are sensuous and bodily, prone to overindulgence that distracts from higher human endeavours; and its objects are at best merely pleasant, not of the highest aesthetic value. Such is the traditional assessment; now let us analyse its justice.
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  20.  29
    Disputing Taste.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2009 - The Philosophers' Magazine 45:70-76.
    The sense of taste falls low on the hierarchy of the senses because it seems a poor conduit for knowledge of the external world; it directs attention inward rather than outward; its pleasures are sensuous and bodily, prone to overindulgence that distracts from higher human endeavours; and its objects are at best merely pleasant, not of the highest aesthetic value. Such is the traditional assessment; now let us analyse its justice.
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  21.  28
    The Bodily Turn.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2007 - The Philosophers' Magazine 39:53-55.
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  22.  28
    Q & A.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2011 - The Philosophers' Magazine 55 (55):114-115.
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  23.  33
    “The Compass in the Eye”.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1993 - The Monist 76 (4):508-523.
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  24.  46
    What Beauty Promises:: Reflections on Alexander Nehamas, Only a Promise of Happiness: The Place of Beauty in a World of Art.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2010 - British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (2):193-198.
    Alexander Nehamas calls beauty a ‘promise of happiness’ and claims that it is an object of love. While this approach appealingly places beauty at the center of both artistic passion and everyday life, it also renders it riskily personal. This discussion raises two main questions to Nehamas. The first question regards the role of happiness in the concept of beauty, for many beautiful artworks seem to acknowledge the inevitability of sorrow rather than its opposite. The second question concerns how beauty (...)
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  25.  32
    Pleasure: Reflections on Aesthetics and Feminism.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1993 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (2):199-206.
  26.  19
    Taste as Sense and as Sensibility.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1997 - Philosophical Topics 25 (1):201-230.
  27.  10
    Fear and Disgust: the Sublime and the Sublate.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2009 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 250 (4):367-379.
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  28.  25
    Pictorial Assertion.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1985 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (3):257-265.
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  29.  17
    Art and the Aesthetic.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1976 - International Philosophical Quarterly 16 (2):245-247.
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  30.  2
    On Distinguishing "Aesthetic" From "Artistic".Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1977 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 11 (4):45.
  31.  14
    Disgust and Aesthetics.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (11):753-761.
    Disgust is an emotion that is visceral, reactive, and uncomfortable. It is also purposively aroused by art in ways that contribute substantially to the meaning of a work. In such cases “aesthetic disgust” is a component of understanding and appreciation. Disgust comes in many varieties, including the humorous, the horrid, and the tragic. The responses it elicits can be strong or subtle, but few are actually pleasant. Therefore aesthetic disgust raises an ancient question: how is it that emotions aroused in (...)
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  32.  22
    Rosalind W. Picard, Affective Computing.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1999 - Minds and Machines 9 (3):443-447.
  33.  14
    Is Pangloss Leibniz?Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1977 - Philosophy and Literature 1 (2):201-208.
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  34.  7
    The Triumph of Time: Romanticism Redux.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2014 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (4):429-435.
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  35. Taste.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2001 - In Berys Nigel Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge.
     
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  36. Joseph H. Kupfer, Experience As Art: Aesthetics in Everyday Life Reviewed By.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1984 - Philosophy in Review 4 (6):266-267.
     
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  37.  4
    AESTHETICS: Perceptions, Pleasures, Arts: Considering Aesthetics.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1997 - In Janet A. Kourany (ed.), Philosophy in a Feminist Voice: Critiques and Reconstructions. Princeton University Press. pp. 145-172.
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  38.  6
    The Meaning of Taste Andi the Taste of Meaning.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2008 - In Alex Neill & Aaron Ridley (eds.), Arguing About Art: Contemporary Philosophical Debates. Routledge. pp. 30.
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  39. Rita Felski, Beyond Feminist Aesthetics: Feminist Literature and Social Change Reviewed By.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1990 - Philosophy in Review 10 (12):489-492.
  40.  12
    Book Review: Aesthetics in Feminist Perspective. [REVIEW]Hilde Sed Hein & ed Korsmeyer, Carolyn - 1995 - Philosophy and Literature 19 (1).
  41.  12
    The Two Beauties: A Perspective on Hutcheson's Aesthetics.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1979 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 38 (2):145-151.
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  42.  1
    What Beauty Promises:: Symposium.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2010 - British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (2):193-198.
    Alexander Nehamas calls beauty a ‘promise of happiness’ and claims that it is an object of love. While this approach appealingly places beauty at the center of both artistic passion and everyday life, it also renders it riskily personal. This discussion raises two main questions to Nehamas. The first question regards the role of happiness in the concept of beauty, for many beautiful artworks seem to acknowledge the inevitability of sorrow rather than its opposite. The second question concerns how beauty (...)
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  43.  10
    Instruments of the Eye: Shortcuts to Perspective.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1989 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (2):139-146.
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  44.  1
    Art and the Aesthetic: An Institutional Analysis. [REVIEW]Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1976 - International Philosophical Quarterly 16 (2):245-247.
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  45.  1
    Disputing Taste.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2009 - The Philosophers' Magazine 45:70-76.
    The sense of taste falls low on the hierarchy of the senses because it seems a poor conduit for knowledge of the external world; it directs attention inward rather than outward; its pleasures are sensuous and bodily, prone to overindulgence that distracts from higher human endeavours; and its objects are at best merely pleasant, not of the highest aesthetic value. Such is the traditional assessment; now let us analyse its justice.
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  46.  5
    Women, Philosophy, and Literature. By JANE DURAN.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (2):476-479.
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  47.  2
    Review: Reconsiderations 5. [REVIEW]Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1983 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 41 (4):443 - 448.
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  48. Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics.Peggy Zeglin Brand & Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1996 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54 (4):404-405.
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  49.  19
    Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics.Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.) - 1995 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics takes a fresh look at the history of aesthetics and at current debates within the philosophy of art by exploring the ways in which gender informs notions of art and creativity, evaluation and interpretation, and concepts of aesthetic value. Multiple intellectual traditions have formed this field, and the discussions herein range from consideration of eighteenth century legacies of ideas about taste, beauty, and sublimity to debates about the relevance of postmodern analyses for feminist aesthetics. Forward (...)
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  50.  23
    Literary Philosophers?: Borges, Calvino, Eco.Jorge J. E. Gracia, Carolyn Korsmeyer & Rodolphe Gasché (eds.) - 2002 - Routledge.
    Borges, Calvino, and Eco are as noted for the intriguing philosophical puzzles they present as they are for their inventive literary styles. In their writings, sequences of causality are reversed, individuals switch identities, and stories of one person mirror those of others. Literary Philosophers brings together a group of distinguished philosophers, literary scholars, and comparativists to explore and debate the relationship between philosophy and literature in the works of these brilliant figures.
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