7 found
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Carolyn Sachs [6]Carolyn E. Sachs [1]
  1.  24
    “Our Market is Our Community”: Women Farmers and Civic Agriculture in Pennsylvania, USA. [REVIEW]Amy Trauger, Carolyn Sachs, Mary Barbercheck, Kathy Brasier & Nancy Ellen Kiernan - 2010 - Agriculture and Human Values 27 (1):43-55.
    Civic agriculture is characterized in the literature as complementary and embedded social and economic strategies that provide economic benefits to farmers at the same time that they ostensibly provide socio-environmental benefits to the community. This paper presents some ways in which women farmers practice civic agriculture. The data come from in-depth interviews with women practicing agriculture in Pennsylvania. Some of the strategies women farmers use to make a living from the farm have little to do with food or agricultural products, (...)
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  2.  33
    Front and Back of the House: Socio-Spatial Inequalities in Food Work. [REVIEW]Carolyn Sachs, Patricia Allen, A. Rachel Terman, Jennifer Hayden & Christina Hatcher - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (1):3-17.
    Work on farms and in restaurants is characterized by highly gendered and racialized divisions of labor, low wages, and persistent inequalities. Gender, race, and ethnicity often determine the spaces where people work in the food system. Although some research focuses on gendered divisions of labor in restaurants and on farms, few efforts look more broadly at intersectional inequalities in food work. Our study examines how inequality is perpetuated through restaurant and farm work in the United States and, specifically, how gender (...)
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  3.  22
    The Poverty of Sustainability: An Analysis of Current Positions. [REVIEW]Carolyn E. Sachs & Patricia L. Allen - 1992 - Agriculture and Human Values 9 (4):29-35.
    A short time ago the idea of sustainable agriculture was accepted only at the extreme margins of the U. S. agricultural systems. Although sustainability has now become a major theme of many U. S. agricultural groups, there remains much under-explored terrain in the meaning of sustainable agriculture. A thorough examination of who and what we want to sustain and how we can sustain them is critical if sustainable agriculture is to be a practical improvement over conventional agriculture. In order to (...)
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  4.  22
    Growing Oca, Ulluco, and Mashua in the Andes: Socioeconomic Differences in Cropping Practices. [REVIEW]Mariela Bianco & Carolyn Sachs - 1998 - Agriculture and Human Values 15 (3):267-280.
    Farmers in Andean communities depend on complex farming systems that combine native and introduced crops, production for subsistence, and production for the market. Home to the well-known potato, the Andean region is also the native place of hundreds of lesser known varieties of tubers such as oca, ulluco, and mashua. Using data from interviews and field observation in the Peruvian community of Picol, we describe the economic and social relevance of these tuber crops in the context of the local farming (...)
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  5.  29
    Public Agricultural Researchers: Reactions to Organic, Low Input and Sustainable Agriculture. [REVIEW]Aaron Harp & Carolyn Sachs - 1992 - Agriculture and Human Values 9 (4):58-63.
    This paper offers a preliminary assessment of the reactions of public agricultural researchers to three terms used currently in the debate surrounding reduced input farming systems: organic, alternative, and sustainable agriculture. It is argued that these terms have been appropriated by the land grant system and their critical content removed to make them palatable to more mainstream agricultural researchers. A national sample of agricultural production researchers is explored, and disciplinary differences in attitudes toward the three terms are assessed. We conclude (...)
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  6.  22
    Reconsidering Diversity in Agriculture and Food Systems: An Ecofeminist Approach. [REVIEW]Carolyn Sachs - 1992 - Agriculture and Human Values 9 (3):4-10.
    The concept of diversity is at the center of environmental and social movements. This paper discusses four aspects of diversity related to agriculture: biological, social, cultural, and product and suggests that viewing diversity solely as difference skirts the issues of redistribution of power and shifting social relations. Ecofeminist conceptions of diversity are discussed with a focus on seeds, forests, and sustainable agriculture. Women's activities at the grassroots level provides new insights and pathways to diversity that combine social, agricultural, and biological (...)
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  7.  15
    Women's Work in the U.S.: Variations by Regions. [REVIEW]Carolyn Sachs - 1985 - Agriculture and Human Values 2 (1):31-39.