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Casey Jo Humbyrd [5]Casey Humbyrd [1]
  1. Fair trade international surrogacy.Casey Humbyrd - 2009 - Developing World Bioethics 9 (3):111-118.
    Since the development of assisted reproductive technologies, infertile individuals have crossed borders to obtain treatments unavailable or unaffordable in their own country. Recent media coverage has focused on the outsourcing of surrogacy to developing countries, where the cost for surrogacy is significantly less than the equivalent cost in a more developed country. This paper discusses the ethical arguments against international surrogacy. The major opposition viewpoints can be broadly divided into arguments about welfare, commodification and exploitation. It is argued that the (...)
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  2.  26
    Profit Motives Require a Proscriptive Approach.Casey Jo Humbyrd & Matthew Wynia - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (6):30-31.
    Volume 19, Issue 6, June 2019, Page 30-31.
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    Complex Obesity: Multifactorial Etiologies and Multifaceted Responses.Casey Jo Humbyrd - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (7):87-89.
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    The Ethics of Bundled Payments in Total Joint Replacement: “Cherry Picking” and “Lemon Dropping”.Casey Jo Humbyrd - 2018 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 29 (1):62-68.
    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has initiated bundled payments for hip and knee total joint replacement in an effort to decrease healthcare costs and increase quality of care. The ethical implications of this program have not been studied. This article considers the ethics of patient selection to improve outcomes; specifically, screening patients by body mass index to determine eligibility for total joint replacement. I argue that this type of screening is not ethically defensible, and that the bundled payment (...)
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  5.  4
    COVID-19 and the orthopaedic surgeon: who gets redeployed?Rachel S. Bronheim & Casey Jo Humbyrd - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (1):3-8.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has increased demand for physicians, leading to widespread redeployment of specialty physicians to care for patients with COVID-19. These redeployments highlight an important question: How do physicians balance competing obligations to their own health, their own patients, and society during a public health crisis? How can physicians, specifically subspecialists, navigate this tension? In this article, we analyse a clinical scenario in which an orthopaedic sports surgeon is redeployed to care for patients with COVID-19. This case raises questions (...)
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    Patient Perspectives on the Use of Frailty, Cognitive Function, and Age in Kidney Transplant Evaluation.Prakriti Shrestha, Sarah E. Van Pilsum Rasmussen, Maria Fazal, Nadia M. Chu, Jacqueline M. Garonzik-Wang, Elisa J. Gordon, Mara McAdams-DeMarco & Casey Jo Humbyrd - 2022 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 13 (4):263-274.
    Background The allocation of scarce deceased donor kidneys is a complex process. Transplant providers are increasingly relying on constructs such as frailty and cognitive function to guide kidney transplant (KT) candidate selection. Patient views of the ethical issues surrounding the use of such constructs are unclear. We sought to assess KT candidates’ attitudes and beliefs about the use of frailty and cognitive function to guide waitlist selection.Methods KT candidates were randomly recruited from an ongoing single-center cohort study of frailty and (...)
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