11 found
Order:
See also
Casey O'Callaghan
Washington University in St. Louis
  1. Object Perception: Vision and Audition.Casey O’Callaghan - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (4):803-829.
    Vision has been the primary focus of naturalistic philosophical research concerning perception and perceptual experience. Guided by visual experience and vision science, many philosophers have focused upon theoretical issues dealing with the perception of objects. Recently, however, hearing researchers have discussed auditory objects. I present the case for object perception in vision, and argue that an analog of object perception occurs in auditory perception. I propose a notion of an auditory object that is stronger than just that of an intentional (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  2. Objects for Multisensory Perception.Casey O’Callaghan - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (5):1269-1289.
    Object perception deploys a suite of perceptual capacities that constrains attention, guides reidentification, subserves recognition, and anchors demonstrative thought. Objects for perception—perceptual objects—are the targets of such capacities. Characterizing perceptual objects for multisensory perception faces two puzzles. First is the diversity of objects across sensory modalities. Second is the unity of multisensory perceptual objects. This paper resolves the puzzles. Objects for perception are structured mereologically complex individuals. Perceptual objects are items that bear perceptible features and have perceptible parts arranged to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  3. Lessons From Beyond Vision (Sounds and Audition).Casey O’Callaghan - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 153 (1):143-160.
    Recent work on non-visual modalities aims to translate, extend, revise, or unify claims about perception beyond vision. This paper presents central lessons drawn from attention to hearing, sounds, and multimodality. It focuses on auditory awareness and its objects, and it advances more general lessons for perceptual theorizing that emerge from thinking about sounds and audition. The paper argues that sounds and audition no better support the privacy of perception’s objects than does vision; that perceptual objects are more diverse than an (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  4.  32
    Perceptual Capacities, Success, and Content.Casey O’Callaghan - 2020 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 100 (3):738-743.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  91
    The Multisensory Character of Perception.Casey O’Callaghan - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy 112 (10):551-569.
    My thesis is that perceptual awareness is richly multisensory. I argue for this conclusion on the grounds that certain forms of multisensory perceptual experience are incompatible with the claim that each aspect of a perceptual experience is associated with some specific sensory modality or another. First, I explicate what it is for some feature of a conscious perceptual episode to be modality specific. Then, I argue based on philosophical and experimental evidence that some novel intermodal features are perceptible only through (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  6. Perceiving the Locations of Sounds.Casey O’Callaghan - 2010 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (1):123-140.
    Frequently, we learn of the locations of things and events in our environment by means of hearing. Hearing, I argue, is a locational mode of perceiving with a robustly spatial phenomenology. I defend three proposals. First, audition furnishes one with information about the locations of things and happenings in one’s environment because auditory experience itself has spatial content—auditory experience involves awareness of space. Second, we hear the locations of things and events by or in hearing the locations of their sounds. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  7.  94
    On Privations and Their Perception.Casey O’Callaghan - 2011 - Acta Analytica 26 (2):175-186.
    Despite its admirable bottom-up methodology, Roy Sorensen's Seeing Dark Things (OUP, 2008) raises difficult theoretical questions concerning the metaphysics and perception of absences. Metaphysical difficulties include how to individuate, count, locate, and classify absences, and what determines their features. Perceptual difficulties include how to distinguish experiences of absences and presences, especially when nonveridical, and what subjects contribute to perceptual experience according to Sorensen's causal theory. In addition to articulating these difficulties, this paper also presents and explores, on Sorensen's terms, an (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  8. Experiencing Speech.Casey O’Callaghan - 2010 - Philosophical Issues 20 (1):305-332.
  9. Echoes.Casey O’Callaghan - 2007 - The Monist 90 (3):403-414.
    Echo experiences are illusory experiences of ordinary primary sounds. Just as there is no new object that we see at the surface of a mirror, there is no new sound that we hear at a reflecting surface. The sound that we hear as an echo just is the original primary sound, though its perception involves illusions of place, time, and qualities. The case of echoes need not force us to adopt a conception according to which sounds are persisting object-like particulars (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10. The World of Sounds.Casey O’Callaghan - 2009 - The Philosophers' Magazine 45 (45):63-69.
    Audition, like vision, is a rich source of information about the environment, and we learn a great deal through hearing. Hearing helps us to negotiate oursurroundings, to a degree that is obscured by preoccupation with the visual. Hearing sounds allows us to access music and spoken language, and thus holds strong emotional and communicative interest for humans.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  7
    The World of Sounds.Casey O’Callaghan & Casey O'Callaghan - 2009 - The Philosophers' Magazine 45:63-69.
    Audition, like vision, is a rich source of information about the environment, and we learn a great deal through hearing. Hearing helps us to negotiate oursurroundings, to a degree that is obscured by preoccupation with the visual. Hearing sounds allows us to access music and spoken language, and thus holds strong emotional and communicative interest for humans.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark