Results for 'Catharine Saint Croix'

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  1. Chisholm's Paradox and Conditional Oughts.Catharine Saint Croix & Richmond Thomason - 2014 - Lecture Notes in Computer Science 8554:192-207.
    Since it was presented in 1963, Chisholm’s paradox has attracted constant attention in the deontic logic literature, but without the emergence of any definitive solution. We claim this is due to its having no single solution. The paradox actually presents many challenges to the formalization of deontic statements, including (1) context sensitivity of unconditional oughts, (2) formalizing conditional oughts, and (3) distinguishing generic from nongeneric oughts. Using the practical interpretation of ‘ought’ as a guideline, we propose a linguistically motivated logical (...)
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  2.  7
    Privilege and Position.Catharine Saint-Croix - 2020 - Res Philosophica 97 (4):489-524.
    How does being a woman affect one’s epistemic life? What about being Black? Or queer? Standpoint theorists argue that such social positions can give rise to otherwise unavailable epistemic privilege. “Epistemic privilege” is a murky concept, however. Critics of standpoint theory argue that the view is offered without a clear explanation of how standpoints confer their benefits, what those benefits are, or why social positions are particularly apt to produce them. For this reason, many regard standpoint theory as being out (...)
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  3. 'Yep, I'm Gay': Understanding Agential Identity.Robin Dembroff & Cat Saint-Croix - 2019 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 6:571-599.
    What’s important about ‘coming out’? Why do we wear business suits or Star Trek pins? Part of the answer, we think, has to do with what we call agential identity. Social metaphysics has given us tools for understanding what it is to be socially positioned as a member of a particular group and what it means to self-identify with a group. But there is little exploration of the general relationship between self-identity and social position. We take up this exploration, developing (...)
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  4.  20
    Saint François de Sales. Prédicateur de la croix.Jean-Pierre Wagner - 1998 - Revue des Sciences Religieuses 72 (2):176-197.
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  5. Saint Jean de la Croix et le Probleme de l\'experience mystique, Paris 1924.Jean Baruzi - 1926 - Kwartalnik Filozoficzny 4 (4):502-504.
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  6.  30
    Saint Jean de la Croix Et le Probleme de l'Experience Mystique.Walter M. Horton - 1932 - Journal of Philosophy 29 (10):277-279.
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  7.  25
    L'œuvre Mystique de Saint Jean de la Croix En Son Rapport Avec la Pensée Juive.Henri Sérouya - 1959 - Revue des Sciences Religieuses 33 (3):269-284.
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  8.  10
    Les Prières de Saint Pierre Damien Pour l'Adoration de la Croix.André Wilmart - 1929 - Revue des Sciences Religieuses 9 (4):513-523.
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  9.  18
    HUOT DE LONGCHAMP, Max, Saint Jean de la Croix. Pour lire le Docteur mystiqueHUOT DE LONGCHAMP, Max, Saint Jean de la Croix. Pour lire le Docteur mystique.Hélène Würtele - 1993 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 49 (1):171-171.
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  10. René Deseartes Et Saint Jean de la Croix.André Bord - 2001 - Sapientia 56 (210):397-434.
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  11. Une Lecture Hégélienne de Saint Jean de la Croix.Georges Cottier - 2002 - Nova Et Vetera 77 (3):47-74.
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  12. Pascal À la Lumière de Saint Jean de la Croix.André Bord - 2002 - Sapientia 57 (211):169-184.
     
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  13.  27
    KRYNEN, Jean, L'apologie Mystique de Quiroga. Saint Jean de la Croix Et la Mystique Chrétienne; KRYNEN, Jean, Saint Jean de la Croix Et l'Aventure de la Mystique espagnoleKRYNEN, Jean, L'apologie Mystique de Quiroga. Saint Jean de la Croix Et la Mystique Chrétienne; KRYNEN, Jean, Saint Jean de la Croix Et l'Aventure de la Mystique Espagnole.Jean-Claude Breton - 1991 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 47 (3):461-462.
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  14. Une Anthropologie À Partir de Saint Jean de la Croix. À Propos d'Un Ouvrage Récent.P. Gilbert - 1981 - Nouvelle Revue Théologique 103 (4):551-562.
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  15.  1
    La Restauration du Christ En Croix de la Cathédrale Saint-Pierre de Nantes : Redécouverte D’Une Technique de Sculpture Inédite Gr'ce À la Tomodensitométrie Et aux Micro-analysesThe Restoration of a Christ on the Cross in Nantes Cathedral: A Little-Known Sculpture Technique Rediscovered Thanks to CT Scanning and Microanalysis.Hélène Gruau, Marie-Pierre Etcheverry, Julie Guttierez & Yves Tillet - 2018 - Techne 46:44-56.
  16. L'expérience de négation chez Saint Jean de la Croix.H. Laux - 1992 - Recherches de Science Religieuse 80 (2):203-226.
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  17. Le Pere Labourdette Lecteur de Saint Jean de la Croix.G. Narcisse - 1992 - Revue Thomiste 92:373-387.
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  18.  5
    Anne-Marie Bavoux, Xavier Thévenot, Un chemin de croix pour aujourd'hui. Saint-Maurice, Éditions Saint-Augustin, 2002, 128 p.Anne-Marie Bavoux, Xavier Thévenot, Un chemin de croix pour aujourd'hui. Saint-Maurice, Éditions Saint-Augustin, 2002, 128 p. [REVIEW]Simonne Plourde - 2002 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 58 (3):641-642.
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  19. Catharine Trotter Cockburn: Philosophical Writings (1702-1747).Catharine Trotter Cockburn - 2006 - Broadview Press.
    An important thinker who contributed to eighteenth-century debates in epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics, Catharine Trotter Cockburn pursued the life of a dramatist and essayist, despite the prevailing social, cultural, and moral prescriptions of her day. Cockburn’s philosophical writings were polemical pieces in defence of such philosophers as John Locke and Samuel Clarke, in which she grappled with the moral and theological questions that concerned them and produced her own unique answers to those questions. Her works are interesting both for (...)
     
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  20.  11
    Omniprescience and Divine Determinism: RICHARD R. LA CROIX.Richard R. La Croix - 1976 - Religious Studies 12 (3):365-381.
    In this essay I will try to show that there are what would appear to be some unnoticed consequences of the doctrine of divine foreknowledge. For the purposes of this discussion I will simply assume that future events are possible objects of knowledge and, hence, that foreknowledge is possible. Accordingly, I will not be concerned with discussing such questions as the status of truth-values for future contingent propositions or whether knowledge is justified true belief. Furthermore, I will not be concerned (...)
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  21.  12
    La logique de la foi et la sagesse mystique.Bernard Lucchesi - 2009 - Recherches de Science Religieuse 97 (2):195.
    Cet article s’intéresse tout d’abord à la logique de la foi chez Bouillard, à partir de deux sources, Logique de la foi et Comprendre ce que l’on croit . Ensuite, à la lumière du dernier article de Bouillard, « Transcendance et Dieu de la foi » , il cherche à voir si la sagesse mystique peut en constituer son accomplissement et celle de l’essence humaine. En s’appuyant sur la conception de la vie mystique telle que la conceptualise saint Jean (...)
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  22.  20
    Visual Rhetoric in "The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas".Paul K. Alkon - 1975 - Critical Inquiry 1 (4):849-881.
    Past, present, and future are reversed in the reader's encounter with the illustrations selected by Gertrude Stein for her Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas.1 After the table of contents there is a table of illustrations that encourages everyone to look at the pictures before they begin reading. During that initial examination, the illustrations forecast what is to be discovered in the text. Expectations are aroused by photographs showing Gertrude Stein in front of the atelier door, rooms hung with paintings, Gertrude (...)
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  23.  4
    Poet: Patriot: Interpreter.Donald A. Davie - 1982 - Critical Inquiry 9 (1):27-43.
    If patriotism can thus be seen as an incentive or as an instigation even in such a recondite science as epistemology, how much more readily can it be seen to perform such functions in other studies more immediately or inextricably bound up with communal human life? I pass over instances that occur to me—for instance, the Victorian Jesuit, Father Hopkins, declaring that every good poem written by an Englishman was a blow struck for England--and profit instead, if I may, by (...)
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  24.  11
    Divine Omniprescience: Are Literary Works Eternal Entities?1: RICHARD R. LA CROIX.Richard R. La Croix - 1979 - Religious Studies 15 (3):281-287.
    There are two quite common views which appear to be embraced by a large number of aestheticians as well as a large number of nonaestheticians. It is quite commonly believed by many of both groups that God is omniscient with respect to the future, that is, that God knows everything that will ever occur. I refer to this belief as the doctrine of divine omniprescience. It is also quite common to many of both groups to believe that literary authorship is (...)
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  25. The Social, Political and Philosophical Works of Catharine Beecher.Catharine Esther Beecher, Dorothy G. Rogers & Therese Boos Dykeman - 2002
  26.  36
    Catharine Trotter Cockburn's Defence of Locke.Jessica Gordon-Roth - 2015 - The Monist 98 (1):64-76.
    Catharine Trotter Cockburn is best known for her Defence of Mr. Locke’s Essay of Human Understanding (1702). However very little has been said about Trotter’s treatment of Locke’s metaphysical commitments therein. In this paper I give a brief description of the history of Trotter’s Defence. Thereafter I focus on two (of the many) objections to which Trotter responds on Locke’s behalf: 1) the objection that Locke has not proved the soul immortal, and 2) the objection that Locke’s view leads (...)
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  27. Canny Resemblance.Catharine Abell - 2009 - Philosophical Review 118 (2):183-223.
    Depiction is the form of representation distinctive of figurative paintings, drawings, and photographs. Accounts of depiction attempt to specify the relation something must bear to an object in order to depict it. Resemblance accounts hold that the notion of resemblance is necessary to the specification of this relation. Several difficulties with such analyses have led many philosophers to reject the possibility of an adequate resemblance account of depiction. This essay outlines these difficulties and argues that current resemblance accounts succumb to (...)
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  28.  32
    Catharine Cockburn on Unthinking Immaterial Substance: Souls, Space, and Related Matters.Emily Thomas - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (4):255-263.
    The early modern Catharine Cockburn wrote on a wide range of philosophical issues and recent years have seen an increasing interest in her work. This paper explores her thesis that immaterial substance need not think. Drawing on existing scholarship, I explore the origin of this thesis in Cockburn and show how she applies it in a novel way to space. This thesis provides a particularly useful entry point into Cockburn's philosophy, as it emphasises the importance of her metaphysics and (...)
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  29. II—Genre, Interpretation and Evaluation.Catharine Abell - 2015 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 115 (1pt1):25-40.
    The genre to which an artwork belongs affects how it is to be interpreted and evaluated. An account of genre and of the criteria for genre membership should explain these interpretative and evaluative effects. Contrary to conceptions of genres as categories distinguished by the features of the works that belong to them, I argue that these effects are to be explained by conceiving of genres as categories distinguished by certain of the purposes that the works belonging to them are intended (...)
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  30. Art: What It Is and Why It Matters.Catharine Abell - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (3):671-691.
    In this paper, I provide a descriptive definition of art that is able to accommodate the existence of bad art, while illuminating the value of good art. This, I argue, is something that existing definitions of art fail to do. I approach this task by providing an account according to which what makes something an artwork is the institutional process by which it is made. I argue that Searle’s account of institutions and institutional facts shows that the existence of all (...)
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  31.  16
    Catharine Macaulay’s Enlightenment Faith and Radical Politics.Karen Green - 2018 - History of European Ideas 44 (1):35-48.
    The disappearance of Catharine Macaulay’s eighteenth-century defense of the doctrines that justified the seventeeth-century republican parliament, has served to obscure an important strand of enlightenment faith, that was active in the lead up to the American and French Revolutions, and that also played a significant role in the history of feminism. This faith was made up of two intertwined strands, ‘Christian eudaimonism’ and ‘rational altruism’. Dominant contemporary accounts of the origins of republicanism and democratic theory during the eighteenth-century have (...)
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  32. The Epistemic Value of Photographs.Catharine Abell - 2010 - In Catharine Abell & Katerina Bantinaki (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Depiction. Oxford University Press.
    There is a variety of epistemic roles to which photographs are better suited than non-photographic pictures. Photographs provide more compelling evidence of the existence of the scenes they depict than non-photographic pictures. They are also better sources of information about features of those scenes that are easily overlooked. This chapter examines several different attempts to explain the distinctive epistemic value of photographs, and argues that none is adequate. It then proposes an alternative explanation of their epistemic value. The chapter argues (...)
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  33. Pictorial Implicature.Catharine Abell - 2005 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (1):55–66.
    It is generally recognised that an adequate resemblance-based account of depiction must specify some standard of correctness which explains how a picture’s content differs from the content we would attribute to it purely on the basis of resemblance. For example, an adequate standard should explain why stick figure drawings do not depict emaciated beings with gargantuan heads. Most attempts to specify a standard of correctness appeal to the intentions of the picture’s maker. However, I argue that the most detailed such (...)
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  34. Saint-Evremond Ecrits Philosophiques : Édition Avec Gravures & Lettrines.Jean-Pierre Saint-Evremond & Jackson - 1996
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  35.  21
    Saint Thomas d'Aquin et le premier fondement naturel de notre connaissance de Dieu.Alphonse Saint-Jacques - 1974 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 30 (3):349.
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  36. Cinema as a Representational Art.Catharine Abell - 2010 - British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (3):273-286.
    In this paper, I develop a unified account of cinematic representation as primary depiction. On this account, cinematic representation is a distinctive form of depiction, unique in its capacity to depict temporal properties. I then explore the consequences of this account for the much-contested question of whether cinema is an independent representational art form. I show that it is, and that Scruton’s argument to the contrary relies on an erroneous conception of cinematic representation. CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this?
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  37. Catharine Cockburn on Substantival Space.Emily Thomas - forthcoming - History of Philosophy Quarterly 30(30).
  38. Of Mice and Men: A Feminist Fragment on Animal Rights.Catharine A. MacKinnon - 2004 - In Cass R. Sunstein & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.), Animal Rights: Current Debates and New Directions. Oxford University Press. pp. 263--76.
     
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  39. Comics and Genre.Catharine Abell - 2012 - In Aaron Meskin & Roy T. Cook (eds.), The Art of Comics: A Philosophical Approach. Blackwell. pp. 68--84.
    An adequate account of the nature of genre and of the criteria for genre membership is essential to understanding the nature of the various categories into which comics can be classified. Because they fail adequately to distinguish genre categories from other ways of categorizing works, including categorizations according to medium or according to style, previous accounts of genre fail to illuminate the nature of comics categories. I argue that genres are sets of conventions that have developed as means of addressing (...)
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  40.  94
    The Impossibility of Defining 'Omnipotence'.Richard R. La Croix - 1977 - Philosophical Studies 32 (2):181-190.
  41.  62
    Catharine Macaulay on the Paradox of Paternal Authority in Hobbesian Politics.Wendy Gunther-Canada - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):150-173.
    : Catharine Macaulay's first political pamphlet, "Loose remarks on certain positions to be found in Mr. Hobbes's philosophical rudiments of government and society with a short sketch for a democratical form of government in a letter to Signor Paoli," published in London in 1769, has received no significant scholarly attention in over two hundred years. It is of primary interest because of the light it sheds on Macaulay's critique of patriarchal politics, which helps to establish a new line of (...)
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  42. Philosophical Perspectives on Depiction.Catharine Abell & Katerina Bantinaki (eds.) - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume of specially written essays by leading philosophers offers to set the agenda for the philosophy of depiction.
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  43. Pictorial Realism.Catharine Abell - 2007 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (1):1 – 17.
    I propose a number of criteria for the adequacy of an account of pictorial realism. Such an account must: explain the epistemic significance of realistic pictures; explain why accuracy and detail are salient to realism; be consistent with an accurate account of depiction; and explain the features of pictorial realism. I identify six features of pictorial realism. I then propose an account of realism as a measure of the information pictures provide about how their objects would look, were one to (...)
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  44.  80
    Against Depictive Conventionalism.Catharine Abell - 2005 - American Philosophical Quarterly 42 (3):185 - 197.
    In this paper, I discuss the influential view that depiction, like language, depends on arbitrary conventions. I argue that this view, however it is elaborated, is false. Any adequate account of depiction must be consistent with the distinctive features of depiction. One such feature is depictive generativity. I argue that, to be consistent with depictive generativity, conventionalism must hold that depiction depends on conventions for the depiction of basic properties of a picture’s object. I then argue that two considerations jointly (...)
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  45.  11
    Catharine Macaulay on the Will.Karen Green & Shannon Weekes - 2013 - History of European Ideas 39 (3):409-425.
    Catharine Macaulay's discussion of freedom of the will in her Treatise on the Immutability of Moral Truth has received little attention, and what discussion there is attributes a number of different, incompatible views to her. In this paper the account of the nature of freedom of the will that she develops is related to her political aspirations, and the metaphysical position that she adopts is compared to those of John Locke, Samuel Clarke, Joseph Priestley, William Godwin, and others. It (...)
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  46.  41
    Printmaking as an Art.Catharine Abell - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (1):23-30.
    Many forms of printmaking involve drawing or painting onto a plate to produce a matrix and then producing prints from that matrix by mechanical processes. One might be skeptical about the artistic significance of such prints, on the basis that only the process of drawing or painting the matrix enables printmakers to exercise intentional control over the features of the resultant prints. This might lead one to think that such forms of printmaking lack artistic significance independent of drawing and painting. (...)
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  47.  7
    Catharine Macaulay on the Paradox of Paternal Authority in Hobbesian Politics.Wendy Gunther-Canada - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):150-173.
    Catharine Macaulay's first political pamphlet, “Loose remarks on certain positions to be found in Mr. Hobbes's philosophical rudiments of government and society with a short sketch for a democratical form of government in a letter to Signor Paoli,” published in London in 1769, has received no significant scholarly attention in over two hundred years. It is of primary interest because of the light it sheds on Macaulay's critique of patriarchal politics, which helps to establish a new line of thinking (...)
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  48. On Outlining the Shape of Depiction.Catharine Abell - 2005 - Ratio 18 (1):27–38.
    In this paper, I discuss the account of depiction proposed by Robert Hopkins in his book Picture, Image and Experience. I first briefly summarise Hopkins’s account, according to which we experience depictions as resembling their objects in respect of outline shape. I then ask whether Hopkins’s account can perform the explanatory tasks required of an adequate account of depiction. I argue that there are at least two reasons for which Hopkins’s account of depiction is inadequate. Firstly, the notion of outline (...)
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  49. Internal and External Pictures.Catharine Abell & Gregory Currie - 1999 - Philosophical Psychology 12 (4):429-445.
    What do pictures and mental images have in common? The contemporary tendency to reject mental picture theories of imagery suggests that the answer is: not much. We show that pictures and visual imagery have something important in common. They both contribute to mental simulations: pictures as inputs and mental images as outputs. But we reject the idea that mental images involve mental pictures, and we use simulation theory to strengthen the anti-pictorialist's case. Along the way we try to account for (...)
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  50. Toward Feminist Jurisprudence.Catharine A. MacKinnon - 1994 - In Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Living with Contradictions: Controversies in Feminist Social Ethics. Westview Press. pp. 34.
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