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  1.  72
    Reductionism, Rationality and Responsibility: A Discussion of Tim O'Keefe, Epicurus on Freedom.Catherine Atherton - 2007 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 89 (2):192-230.
    O'Keefe's contention that Epicurus devised the atomic swerve to counter a threat to the efficacy of reason posed by the thesis that the future is fixed regardless of what we do, is not supported by the evidence he adduces. Epicurus' own words in On nature XXV, and testimony from Lucretius and Cicero, tell far more strongly in favour of the traditional view, that Epicurus' concerns were causal determinism and its threat to moral responsiblity for our actions and characters.
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  2.  6
    Philosophy of Language.Catherine Atherton - 2009 - In James Warren (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Epicureanism. Cambridge University Press. pp. 197.
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  3.  22
    Apollonius Dyscolus and the Ambiguity of Ambiguity.Catherine Atherton - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (02):441-.
    Apollonius Dyscolus’ use of ambiguity in grammatical problem-solving has in recent years had the benefit of two scholarly studies. David Blank, in the course of his analysis of the Syntax as a whole , has described the broad functions which Apollonius assigns to ambiguity. Jean Lallot's 1988 paper, ‘Apollonius Dyscole et l'ambigüité linguistique: problemes et solutions’, is devoted exclusively to the treatment of linguistic ambiguity in Apollonius’ work. Yet it is to be feared that the flood of light thrown by (...)
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  4.  21
    Hand Over Fist: The Failure of Stoic Rhetoric.Catherine Atherton - 1988 - Classical Quarterly 38 (02):392-.
    Students of Stoic philosophy, especially of Stoic ethics, have a lot to swallow. Virtues and emotions are bodies; virtue is the only good, and constitutes happiness, while vice is the only evil; emotions are judgements ; all sins are equal; and everyone bar the sage is mad, bad and dangerous to know. Non-Stoics in antiquity seem for the most part to find these doctrines as bizarre as we do. Their own philosophical or ideological perspectives, and the criticisms of the Stoa (...)
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  5.  1
    The Stoics on Ambiguity.David Blank & Catherine Atherton - 1995 - Philosophical Review 104 (2):267.
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  6.  2
    What Every Grammarian Knows?Catherine Atherton - 1996 - Classical Quarterly 46 (01):239-.
    The grammarians of antiquity, unlike some of their modern counterparts, seem to have had little interest in investigating ‘what every speaker knows’, at least as a largescale project, consciously articulated and embarked on. The object of such a project would be to determine what constitutes such knowledge—or mastery, or cognition, or whatever name it is given—in actual speakers. An alternative goal would be an account of something knowledge of which would count as knowledge of the language in question, even if (...)
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  7. Form and Content in Didactic Poetry.Catherine Atherton (ed.) - 1998
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  8. Lucretius on What Language is Not.Catherine Atherton - 2005 - In Dorothea Frede Brad Inwood (ed.), Language and Learning: Philosophy of Language in the Hellenistic Age. Cambridge University Press. pp. 101–38.
     
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  9.  91
    The Stoics on Ambiguity.Catherine Atherton - 1993 - Cambridge University Press.
    Stoic work on ambiguity represents one of the most innovative, sophisticated and rigorous contributions to philosophy and the study of language in western antiquity. This book is both a comprehensive survey of the often difficult and scattered sources, and an attempt to locate Stoic material in the rich array of contexts, ancient and modern, which alone can guarantee full appreciation of its subtlety, scope and complexity. The comparisons and contrasts which this book constructs will intrigue not just classical scholars, and (...)
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  10. What Every Grammarian Knows?Catherine Atherton - 1996 - Classical Quarterly 46 (1):239-260.
    The grammarians of antiquity, unlike some of their modern counterparts, seem to have had little interest in investigating ‘what every speaker knows’, at least as a largescale project, consciously articulated and embarked on. The object of such a project would be to determine what constitutes such knowledge—or mastery, or cognition, or whatever name it is given—in actual speakers. An alternative goal would be an account of something knowledge of which would count as knowledge of the language in question, even if (...)
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  11. The Stoic Contribution to Traditional Grammar.David Blank & Catherine Atherton - 2003 - In Brad Inwood (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to the Stoics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 310--327.
     
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