Results for 'Catherine Elizabeth Kendig'

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Catherine Elizabeth Kendig
Michigan State University
  1. What is Proof of Concept Research and How Does It Generate Epistemic and Ethical Categories for Future Scientific Practice?Catherine Elizabeth Kendig - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (3):735-753.
    “Proof of concept” is a phrase frequently used in descriptions of research sought in program announcements, in experimental studies, and in the marketing of new technologies. It is often coupled with either a short definition or none at all, its meaning assumed to be fully understood. This is problematic. As a phrase with potential implications for research and technology, its assumed meaning requires some analysis to avoid it becoming a descriptive category that refers to all things scientifically exciting. I provide (...)
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  2. Grounding Knowledge and Normative Valuation in Agent-Based Action and Scientific Commitment.Catherine Elizabeth Kendig - 2018 - In Hauke Riesch, Nathan Emmerich & Steven Wainwright (eds.), Philosophies and Sociologies of Bioethics: Crossing the Divides. Cham, Switzerland: pp. 41-64.
    Philosophical investigation in synthetic biology has focused on the knowledge-seeking questions pursued, the kind of engineering techniques used, and on the ethical impact of the products produced. However, little work has been done to investigate the processes by which these epistemological, metaphysical, and ethical forms of inquiry arise in the course of synthetic biology research. An attempt at this work relying on a particular area of synthetic biology will be the aim of this chapter. I focus on the reengineering of (...)
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  3.  92
    Natural Kinds and Classification in Scientific Practice.Catherine Kendig (ed.) - 2016 - Routledge.
    This edited volume of 13 new essays aims to turn past discussions of natural kinds on their head. Instead of presenting a metaphysical view of kinds based largely on an unempirical vantage point, it pursues questions of kindedness which take the use of kinds and activities of kinding in practice as significant in the articulation of them as kinds. The book brings philosophical study of current and historical episodes and case studies from various scientific disciplines to bear on natural kinds (...)
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  4. Activities of Kinding in Scientific Practice.Catherine Kendig - 2016 - In C. Kendig (ed.), Natural Kinds and Classification in Scientific Practice. Routledge.
    Discussions over whether these natural kinds exist, what is the nature of their existence, and whether natural kinds are themselves natural kinds aim to not only characterize the kinds of things that exist in the world, but also what can knowledge of these categories provide. Although philosophically critical, much of the past discussions of natural kinds have often answered these questions in a way that is unresponsive to, or has actively avoided, discussions of the empirical use of natural kinds and (...)
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  5.  80
    Homologizing as Kinding.Catherine Kendig - 2016 - In C. Kendig (ed.), Natural Kinds and Classification in Scientific Practice. Routledge.
    Homology is a natural kind concept, but one that has been notoriously elusive to pin down. There has been sustained debate over the nature of correspondence and the units of comparison. But this continued debate over its meaning has focused on defining homology rather than on its use in practice. The aim of this chapter is to concentrate on the practices of homologizing. I define “homologizing” to be a concept-in-use. Practices of homologizing are kinds of rule following, the satisfaction of (...)
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  6. Can the Epistemic Value of Natural Kinds Be Explained Independently of Their Metaphysics?Catherine Kendig & John Grey - 2021 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 72 (2):359-376.
    The account of natural kinds as stable property clusters is premised on the possibility of separating the epistemic value of natural kinds from their underlying metaphysics. On that account, the co-instantiation of any sub-cluster of the properties associated with a given natural kind raises the probability of the co-instantiation of the rest, and this clustering of property instantiation is invariant under all relevant counterfactual perturbations. We argue that it is not possible to evaluate the stability of a cluster of properties (...)
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  7. Towards a Multidimensional Metaconception of Species.Catherine Kendig - 2014 - Ratio 27 (2):155-172.
    Species concepts aim to define the species category. Many of these rely on defining species in terms of natural lineages and groupings. A dominant gene-centred metaconception has shaped notions of what constitutes both a natural lineage and a natural grouping. I suggest that relying on this metaconception provides an incomplete understanding of what constitute natural lineages and groupings. If we take seriously the role of epigenetic, behavioural, cultural, and ecological inheritance systems, rather than exclusively genetic inheritance, a broader notion of (...)
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  8. Race as a Physiosocial Phenomenon.Catherine Kendig - 2011 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 33 (2):191-222.
    This paper offers both a criticism of and a novel alternative perspective on current ontologies that take race to be something that is either static and wholly evident at one’s birth or preformed prior to it. In it I survey and critically assess six of the most popular conceptions of race, concluding with an outline of my own suggestion for an alternative account. I suggest that race can be best understood in terms of one’s experience of his or her body, (...)
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  9. Ontology and Values Anchor Indigenous and Grey Nomenclatures: A Case Study in Lichen Naming Practices Among the Samí, Sherpa, Scots, and Okanagan.Catherine Kendig - 2020 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 84:101340.
    Ethnobotanical research provides ample justification for comparing diverse biological nomenclatures and exploring ways that retain alternative naming practices. However, how (and whether) comparison of nomenclatures is possible remains a subject of discussion. The comparison of diverse nomenclatural practices introduces a suite of epistemic and ontological difficulties and considerations. Different nomenclatures may depend on whether the communities using them rely on formalized naming conventions; cultural or spiritual valuations; or worldviews. Because of this, some argue that the different naming practices may not (...)
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  10.  80
    The History and Philosophy of Taxonomy as an Information Science.Catherine Kendig & Joeri Witteveen - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (3):1-9.
    We undeniably live in an information age—as, indeed, did those who lived before us. After all, as the cultural historian Robert Darnton pointed out: ‘every age was an age of information, each in its own way’ (Darnton 2000: 1). Darnton was referring to the news media, but his insight surely also applies to the sciences. The practices of acquiring, storing, labeling, organizing, retrieving, mobilizing, and integrating data about the natural world has always been an enabling aspect of scientific work. Natural (...)
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  11.  54
    Catherine Kendig, Ed. Natural Kinds and Classification in Scientific Practice. London: Routledge, 2016. Pp. Xx+247. $153.00.Max Dresow & Alan C. Love - 2018 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 8 (1):217-222.
    Nobody wants unnatural kinds. Just as we prefer all natural ingredients in our food, so also we prefer natural kinds in our ontology and epistemology. Philosophers contrast natural with merely “conventional” kinds, and scientists advocate for natural rather than artificial classification systems. A central plank of the desired naturalness is “mind independence”—the property of existing independent of human interests and desires. Natural kinds are discovered, not made. They reflect the structure of the world (“nature’s joints”) and for this reason justify (...)
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  12. Reengineering Metaphysics: Modularity, Parthood, and Evolvability in Metabolic Engineering.Catherine Kendig & Todd T. Eckdahl - 2017 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 9 (8).
    The premise of biological modularity is an ontological claim that appears to come out of practice. We understand that the biological world is modular because we can manipulate different parts of organisms in ways that would only work if there were discrete parts that were interchangeable. This is the foundation of the BioBrick assembly method widely used in synthetic biology. It is one of a number of methods that allows practitioners to construct and reconstruct biological pathways and devices using DNA (...)
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  13. Synthetic Biology and Biofuels.Catherine Kendig - 2014 - In Paul B. Thompson & David M. Kaplan (eds.), Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics. Springer.
    Synthetic biology is a field of research that concentrates on the design, construction, and modification of new biomolecular parts and metabolic pathways using engineering techniques and computational models. By employing knowledge of operational pathways from engineering and mathematics such as circuits, oscillators, and digital logic gates, it uses these to understand, model, rewire, and reprogram biological networks and modules. Standard biological parts with known functions are catalogued in a number of registries (e.g. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Registry of Standard Biological (...)
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  14. Considering the Role Marked Variation Plays in Classifying Humans: A Normative Approach.Catherine Kendig - 2018 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 13 (10):1-15.
    The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the ongoing analyses that aim to confront the problem of marked variation. Negatively marked differences are those natural variations that are used to cleave human beings into different categories (e.g., of disablement, of medicalized pathology, of subnormalcy, or of deviance). The problem of marked variation is: Why are some rather than other variations marked as epistemically or culturally significant or as a diagnostic of pathology, and What is the epistemic background that (...)
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  15.  53
    Comparing Ethical Ideologies Across Cultures.Catherine N. Axinn, M. Elizabeth Blair, Alla Heorhiadi & Sharon V. Thach - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 54 (2):103 - 119.
    Using measures developed by Singhapakdi et al. (1996, Journal of Business ethics 15, 1131–1140) the perceived importance of ethics and social responsibility (PRESOR) is measured among MBA students in the United States, Malaysia and Ukraine revealing a stockholder view and two stakeholder views. Relativism and Idealism are also measured. The scores of MBA students are compared among each other and with those of the U.S. managers who were part of the original study. Managers'' scores tend to be significantly higher on (...)
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  16.  41
    Scott Lidgard and Lynn K. Nyhart, Eds. Biological Individuality: Integrating Scientific, Philosophical, and Historical Perspectives. [REVIEW]Catherine Kendig - 2018 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 8 (2):475-480.
    Biologists, historians of biology, and philosophers of biology often ask what is it to be an individual, really. This book does not answer that question. Instead, it answers a much more interesting one: How do biologists individuate individuals? In answering that question, the authors explore why biologists individuate individuals, in what ways, and for what purposes. The cross-disciplinary, dialogical approach to answering metaphysical questions that is pursued in the volume may seem strange to metaphysicians who are not biologically focused, but (...)
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  17. The Species Problem: A Philosophical Analysis. By Richard A. Richards. (Cambridge UP, 2010. Pp. X + 236. Price £50.00.).Catherine Kendig - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (247):405-408.
  18.  65
    The Ethics of Speculative Anticipation and the Covid-19 Pandemic.Catherine Kendig & Wenda K. Bauchspies - 2021 - Hypatia 36 (1):228-236.
    This paper explores the role of speculative anticipation in ethics during the COVID-19 pandemic and provides a structure to think about ethical decision-making in times of extreme uncertainty. We identify three different but interwoven domains within which speculative anticipation can be found: global, local, and projective anticipation. Our analysis aims to open possibilities of seeing the situatedness of others both locally and globally in order to address larger social issues that have been laid bare by the presence of SARS-CoV-2. Our (...)
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  19. Integrating History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences in Practice to Enhance Science Education: Swammerdam’s Historia Insectorum Generalis and the Case of the Water Flea.Catherine Kendig - 2013 - Science & Education 22 (8):1939-1961.
    Abstract: Hasok Chang (Sci Educ 20:317–341, 2011) shows how the recovery of past experimental knowledge, the physical replication of historical experiments, and the extension of recovered knowledge can increase scientific understanding. These activities can also play an important role in both science and history and philosophy of science education. In this paper I describe the implementation of an integrated learning project that I initiated, organized, and structured to complement a course in history and philosophy of the life sciences (HPLS). The (...)
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  20. Hybridity in Agriculture.Catherine Kendig - 2014 - In Paul B. Thompson & David M. Kaplan (eds.), Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics. Springer.
    In a very general sense, hybrid can be understood to be any organism that is the product of two (or more) organisms where each parent belongs to a different kind. For example; the offspring from two or more parent organisms, each belonging to a separate species (or genera), is called a “hybrid”. “Hybridity” refers to the phenomenal character of being a hybrid. And “hybridization ” refers to both natural and artificial processes of generating hybrids. These processes include mechanisms of selective (...)
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  21. John S. Wilkins and Malte C. Ebach: The Nature of Classification: Relationships and Kinds in the Natural Sciences: Palgrave, Macmillan, 2014, Pp., Vii + 197, Price £60/$100.00.Catherine Kendig - 2015 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 37 (4):477-479.
    John Wilkins and Malte Ebach respond to the dismissal of classification as something we need not concern ourselves with because it is, as Ernest Rutherford suggested, mere ‘‘stamp collecting.’’ They contend that classification is neither derivative of explanation or of hypothesis-making but is necessarily prior and prerequisite to it. Classification comes first and causal explanations are dependent upon it. As such it is an important (but neglected) area of philosophical study. Wilkins and Ebach reject Norwood Russell Hanson’s thesis that classification (...)
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  22. Debates in Philosophy of Biology: One Long Argument, or Many?Catherine Kendig - 2011 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 25 (1):73 - 81.
    Philosophy of biology, perhaps more than any other philosophy of science, is a discipline in flux. What counts as consensus and key arguments in certain areas changes rapidly.The publication of Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Biology (2010 Wiley-Blackwell) is reviewed and is used as a catalyst to a discussion of the recent expansion of subjects and perspectives in the philosophy of biology as well as their diverse epistemological and methodological commitments.
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  23.  22
    Defining and Negotiating the Social Value of Research in Public Health Facilities: Perceptions of Stakeholders in a Research‐Active Province of South Africa.Elizabeth Lutge, Catherine Slack & Douglas Wassenaar - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (2):128-135.
    This article reports on qualitative research conducted in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, among researchers and gate-keepers of health facilities in the province. Results suggest disparate but not irreconcilable perceptions of the social value of research in provincial health facilities. This study found that researchers tended to emphasize the contribution of research to the generation of knowledge and to the health of future patients while gate-keepers of health facilities tended to emphasize its contribution to the healthcare system and to current patients. Furthermore, (...)
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  24.  63
    An Ontogenetic-Ecological Conception of Species: A New Approach to an Old Idea.Catherine Kendig - 2010 - EPSA09: 2nd Conference of the European Philosophy of Science Association. Online at PhilSci Archive.
    This paper outlines an alternative perspective on species that avoids some of the underlying assumptions held by the BSC and other gene-centred species concepts. It begins with a characterisation of the species problem and some of the assumptions underpinning conceptions of species. In particular, the underlying bias of some conceptions (such as the BSC) to focus exclusively on the adult stage of the life cycle in articulating what a species is.
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  25.  23
    Reconstructing the Concept of Homology for Genomics.Catherine Kendig - 2001 - Pittsburgh/London Colloquium on Philosophy of Biology and Neuroscience, University of London. Online at PhilSci Archive.
    Homology has been one of, if not the most, fecund concepts which has been used towards the understanding of the genomes of the model organisms. The evidence for this claim can be supported best with an examination of current research in comparative genomics. In comparative genomics, the information of genes or segments of the genome, and their location and sequence, are used to search for genes similar to them, known as 'homologues'. Homologues can be either within that same organism (paralogues), (...)
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  26.  8
    La forme dialogique dans le Periphyseon : recréer l'esprit.Elizabeth Kendig & Lila Lamrani - 2013 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 104 (1):101.
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  27.  51
    Review of Global Epistemologies and Philosophies of Science, Routledge, 2021. [REVIEW]Robert A. Wilson, Edwin Etieyibo, Raphael Uchôa, Andrew Buskell & Catherine Kendig - forthcoming - Philosophy of Science.
    Review of the 26 chapters in the collection Global Epistemologies and Philosophies of Science, Routledge, 2021.
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  28.  13
    Participant Experience of Invasive Research in Adults with Intellectual Disability.Catherine Jane McAllister, Claire Louise Kelly, Katherine Elizabeth Manning & Anthony John Holland - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):594-597.
    Clinical research is a necessity if effective and safe treatments are to be developed. However, this may well include the need for research that is best described as ‘invasive’ in that it may be associated with some discomfort or inconvenience. Limitations in the undertaking of invasive research involving people with intellectual disabilities (ID) are perhaps related to anxieties within the academic community and among ethics committees; however, the consequence of this neglect is that innovative treatments specific to people with ID (...)
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  29.  16
    Interoceptive Ability Predicts Aversion to Losses.Peter Sokol-Hessner, Catherine A. Hartley, Jeffrey R. Hamilton & Elizabeth A. Phelps - 2015 - Cognition and Emotion 29 (4):695-701.
  30.  6
    Elizabeth J. Moodey, Illuminated Crusader Histories for Philip the Good of Burgundy. Turnhout: Brepols, 2012. Pp. Viii, 312; 38 Color Figures. €100. ISBN: 9782503518046. [REVIEW]Catherine Emerson - 2014 - Speculum 89 (1):219-220.
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  31.  12
    Elizabeth S. Bolman , Monastic Visions. Wall Paintings in the Monastery of St. Antony at the Red Sea.Catherine Jolivet-lévy - 2004 - Byzantinische Zeitschrift 96 (1):287-290.
    Dans ce beau livre, superbement édité, sont reproduites pour la première fois depuis leur récente restauration les peintures de l'église du monastère de Saint-Antoine, décor du XIIIe siècle qui est non seulement le plus complet et le mieux conservé d'Égypte, mais qui est aussi l'un des rares à être précisément daté. Il ne s'agit pas d'une monographie traditionnelle, mais d'un ouvrage collectif réunissant autour d'Elizabeth Bolman, maître d'œuvre de l'entreprise, une série d'auteurs venus d'horizons divers, dont les regards croisés (...)
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  32. Towards a Philosophy of Academic Publishing.Michael A. Peters, Petar Jandrić, Ruth Irwin, Kirsten Locke, Nesta Devine, Richard Heraud, Andrew Gibbons, Tina Besley, Jayne White, Daniella Forster, Liz Jackson, Elizabeth Grierson, Carl Mika, Georgina Stewart, Marek Tesar, Susanne Brighouse, Sonja Arndt, George Lazaroiu, Ramona Mihaila, Catherine Legg & Leon Benade - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (14):1401-1425.
    This article is concerned with developing a philosophical approach to a number of significant changes to academic publishing, and specifically the global journal knowledge system wrought by a range of new digital technologies that herald the third age of the journal as an electronic, interactive and mixed-media form of scientific communication. The paper emerges from an Editors' Collective, a small New Zealand-based organisation comprised of editors and reviewers of academic journals mostly in the fields of education and philosophy. The paper (...)
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  33. Book Review: Michelle Elizabeth Tusan, Women Making News: Gender and Journalism in Modern Britain. Urbana and Chicago: Illinois University Press, 2005. X + 306 Pp. (Incl. Index). ISBN 0—252—03015—X, $45. [REVIEW]Catherine Clay - 2007 - Feminist Theory 8 (3):353-354.
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  34.  28
    Titles and Abstracts for the Pitt-London Workshop in the Philosophy of Biology and Neuroscience: September 2001.Karen Arnold, James Bogen, Ingo Brigandt, Joe Cain, Paul Griffiths, Catherine Kendig, James Lennox, Alan C. Love, Peter Machamer, Jacqueline Sullivan, Gianmatteo Mameli, Sandra D. Mitchell, David Papineau, Karola Stotz & D. M. Walsh - manuscript
    Titles and abstracts for the Pitt-London Workshop in the Philosophy of Biology and Neuroscience: September 2001.
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  35.  22
    Moral Standards for Research in Developing Countries From "Reasonable Availability" to "Fair Benefits".Maged El Setouhy, Tsiri Agbenyega, Francis Anto, Christine Alexandra Clerk, Kwadwo A. Koram, Michael English, Rashid Juma, Catherine Molyneux, Norbert Peshu, Newton Kumwenda, Joseph Mfutso-Bengu, Malcolm Molyneux, Terrie Taylor, Doumbia Aissata Diarra, Saibou Maiga, Mamadou Sylla, Dione Youssouf, Catherine Olufunke Falade, Segun Gbadegesin, Reidar Lie, Ferdinand Mugusi, David Ngassapa, Julius Ecuru, Ambrose Talisuna, Ezekiel Emanuel, Christine Grady, Elizabeth Higgs, Christopher Plowe, Jeremy Sugarman & David Wendler - 2004 - Hastings Center Report 34 (3):17.
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  36. Action Research for Teacher Candidates: Using Classroom Data to Enhance Instruction.Robert P. Pelton, Elizabeth Baker, Johnna Bolyard, Reagan Curtis, Jaci Webb-Dempsey, Debi Gartland, Mark Girod, David Hoppey, Geraldine Jenny, Marie LeJeune, Catherine C. Lewis, Aimee Morewood, Susan H. Pillets, Neal Shambaugh, Tracy Smiles, Robert Snyder, Linda Taylor & Steve Wojcikiewicz - 2010 - R&L Education.
    This book has been written in the hopes of equipping teachers-in-training—that is, teacher candidates—with the skills needed for action research: a process that leads to focused, effective, and responsive strategies that help students succeed.
     
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  37.  33
    Spanish Christian Cabala: The Works of Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Jesús, and San Juan de la Cruz. Catherine Swietlicki.Elizabeth Howe - 1988 - Speculum 63 (3):722-724.
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  38.  19
    Psychotherapy, American Culture, and Social Policy: Immoral Individualism. Elizabeth A. Throop. New York: Palgrave MacMillan. 2009. Vii+169pp. [REVIEW]Catherine Raeff - 2009 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 37 (4):1-3.
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  39.  13
    Johannes de Grocheio, Ars Musice, Ed. And Trans. Constant J. Mews, John N. Crossley, Catherine Jeffreys, Leigh McKinnon, and Carol J. Williams.(TEAMS Varia.) Kalamazoo, MI: Medieval Institute Publications, 2011. Paper. Pp. Ix, 168; Tables. $20. ISBN: 9781580441650. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Eva Leach - 2013 - Speculum 88 (2):530-532.
  40. Motives and Risk Perceptions of Participants in a Phase 1 Trial for Hepatitis C Virus Investigational Therapy in Pregnancy.Yasaswi Kislovskiy, Catherine Chappell, Emily Flaherty, Megan E. Hamm, Flor de Abril Cameron, Elizabeth Krans & Judy C. Chang - forthcoming - Sage Publications Ltd: Research Ethics.
    Research Ethics, Ahead of Print. Limited research has been done among pregnant people participating in investigational drug trials. To enhance the ethical understanding of pregnant people’s perspectives on research participation, we sought to describe motives and risk perceptions of participants in a phase 1 trial of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir treatment for chronic Hepatitis C virus during pregnancy. Pregnant people with chronic HCV infection enrolled in an open-label, phase 1 study of LDV/SOF participated in semi-structured, in-depth interviews to explore their reasons for participation (...)
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  41. Motives and Risk Perceptions of Participants in a Phase 1 Trial for Hepatitis C Virus Investigational Therapy in Pregnancy.Yasaswi Kislovskiy, Catherine Chappell, Emily Flaherty, Megan E. Hamm, Flor de Abril Cameron, Elizabeth Krans & Judy C. Chang - forthcoming - Research Ethics.
    Limited research has been done among pregnant people participating in investigational drug trials. To enhance the ethical understanding of pregnant people’s perspectives on research participation,...
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  42.  3
    The Metaphysical Society (1869–1880): Intellectual Life in Mid-Victorian England Ed. By Catherine Marshall, Bernard Lightman, and Richard England. [REVIEW]Elizabeth A. Huddleston - 2020 - Newman Studies Journal 17 (2):113-116.
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  43.  7
    The Papers of the Metaphysical Society 1869–1880: A Critical Edition Ed. By Catherine Marshall, Bernard Lightman, and Richard England. [REVIEW]Elizabeth H. Farnsworth - 2018 - Newman Studies Journal 15 (1):82-83.
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  44.  6
    Egypt's Other Wars: Epidemics and the Politics of Public Health. Nancy Elizabeth Gallagher.Catherine J. Kudlick - 1992 - Isis 83 (2):357-358.
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    Ethical Challenges Experienced by Clinical Research Nurses.Mary E. Larkin, Brian Beardslee, Enrico Cagliero, Catherine A. Griffith, Kerry Milaszewski, Marielle T. Mugford, Joanna M. Myerson, Wen Ni, Donna J. Perry, Sabune Winkler & Elizabeth R. Witte - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301769344.
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  46.  58
    Theorizing Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture. Catherine E. Karkov, Fred Orton.Elizabeth Coatsworth - 2005 - Speculum 80 (3):906-907.
  47.  2
    Book Review: Our Roots Run Deep as Ironweed: Appalachian Women and the Fight for Environmental Justice by Shannon Elizabeth Bell. [REVIEW]Catherine Mobley - 2014 - Gender and Society 28 (6):934-936.
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  48.  2
    Psychotherapy, American Culture, and Social Policy: Immoral Individualism. Elizabeth A. Throop. New York: Palgrave MacMillan. 2009. Vii+169pp. [REVIEW]Catherine Raeff - 2009 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 37 (4):1-3.
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  49.  10
    Implementing a Shared Decision‐Making and Cognitive Strategy‐Based Intervention: Knowledge User Perspectives and Recommendations.Kay-Ann M. Allen, Katherine R. Dittmann, Jennifer A. Hutter, Catherine Chuang, Michelle L. Donald, Amie L. Enns, Nina Hovanec, Anne W. Hunt, Richard S. Kellowan, Elizabeth A. Linkewich, Alexandra S. Patel, Anisha Rehmtulla & Sara E. McEwen - 2020 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 26 (2):575-581.
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  50.  13
    Young Children's Use of Functional Information to Categorize Artifacts: Three Factors That Matter.Deborah G. Kemler Nelson, Anne Frankenfield, Catherine Morris & Elizabeth Blair - 2000 - Cognition 77 (2):133-168.
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