Results for 'Catherine Gliwa'

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  1.  45
    Do Researchers Have an Obligation to Actively Look for Genetic Incidental Findings?Catherine Gliwa & Benjamin E. Berkman - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (2):32-42.
    The rapid growth of next-generation genetic sequencing has prompted debate about the responsibilities of researchers toward genetic incidental findings. Assuming there is a duty to disclose significant incidental findings, might there be an obligation for researchers to actively look for these findings? We present an ethical framework for analyzing whether there is a positive duty to look for genetic incidental findings. Using the ancillary care framework as a guide, we identify three main criteria that must be present to give rise (...)
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  2.  18
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Do Researchers Have an Obligation to Actively Look for Genetic Incidental Findings?”.Catherine Gliwa & Benjamin E. Berkman - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (5):W10-W11.
  3.  47
    What should we do with our brain?Catherine Malabou - 2008 - New York: Fordham University Press.
    But in this book, Catherine Malabou proposes a more radical meaning for plasticity, one that not only adapts itself to existing circumstances, but forms a ...
  4.  55
    Plato's philosophers: the coherence of the dialogues.Catherine H. Zuckert - 2009 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    Introduction: Platonic dramatology -- The political and philosophical problems. Using pre-Socratic philosophy to support political reform: the Athenian stranger ; Plato's Parmenides: Parmenides' critique of Socrates and Plato's critique of Parmenides ; Becoming Socrates ; Socrates interrogates his contemporaries about the noble and good -- Paradigms of philosophy. Socrates' positive teaching ; Timaeus-Critias: completing or challenging Socratic political philosophy? ; Socratic practice -- The trial and death of Socrates. The limits of human intelligence ; The Eleatic challenge ; The trial (...)
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  5. True enough.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2004 - Philosophical Issues 14 (1):113–131.
    Truth is standardly considered a requirement on epistemic acceptability. But science and philosophy deploy models, idealizations and thought experiments that prescind from truth to achieve other cognitive ends. I argue that such felicitous falsehoods function as cognitively useful fictions. They are cognitively useful because they exemplify and afford epistemic access to features they share with the relevant facts. They are falsehoods in that they diverge from the facts. Nonetheless, they are true enough to serve their epistemic purposes. Theories that contain (...)
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  6. Epicureanism at the origins of modernity.Catherine Wilson - 2008 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    This landmark study examines the role played by the rediscovery of the writings of the ancient atomists, Epicurus and Lucretius, in the articulation of the major philosophical systems of the seventeenth century, and, more broadly, their influence on the evolution of natural science and moral and political philosophy. The target of sustained and trenchant philosophical criticism by Cicero, and of opprobrium by the Christian Fathers of the early Church, for its unflinching commitment to the absence of divine supervision and the (...)
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  7. Hope as a Source of Grit.Catherine Rioux - 2022 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 8 (33):264-287.
    Psychologists and philosophers have argued that the capacity for perseverance or “grit” depends both on willpower and on a kind of epistemic resilience. But can a form of hopefulness in one’s future success also constitute a source of grit? I argue that substantial practical hopefulness, as a hope to bring about a desired outcome through exercises of one’s agency, can serve as a distinctive ground for the capacity for perseverance. Gritty agents’ “practical hope” centrally involves an attention-fuelled, risk-inclined weighting of (...)
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  8.  84
    Dumb beasts and dead philosophers: humanity and the humane in ancient philosophy and literature.Catherine Osborne - 2007 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    The book is about three things. First, how Ancient thinkers perceived humans as like or unlike other animals; second about the justification for taking a humane attitude towards natural things; and third about how moral claims count as true, and how they can be discovered or acquired. Was Aristotle was right to see continuity in the psychological functions of animal and human souls? The question cannot be settled without taking a moral stance. As we can either focus on continuity or (...)
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  9. ``Is Understanding Factive?".Catherine Z. Elgin - 2009 - In ``Is Understanding Factive?". Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 322--30.
  10.  24
    Counterpath: traveling with Jacques Derrida.Catherine Malabou - 2004 - Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press. Edited by Jacques Derrida.
    Counterpath is a collaborative work by Catherine Malabou and Jacques Derrida that answers to the gamble inherent in the idea of “travelling with” the philosopher of deconstruction. Malabou's readerly text of quotations and commentary demonstrates how Derrida's work, while appearing to be anything but a travelogue, is nevertheless replete with references to geographical and topographical locations, and functions as a kind of counter-Odyssey through meaning, theorizing, and thematizing notions of arrival, drifting, derivation, and catastrophe. In fact, by going straight (...)
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  11. On the Epistemic Costs of Friendship: Against the Encroachment View.Catherine Rioux - 2023 - Episteme 20 (2):247-264.
    I defend the thesis that friendship can constitutively require epistemic irrationality against a recent, forceful challenge, raised by proponents of moral and pragmatic encroachment. Defenders of the “encroachment strategy” argue that exemplary friends who are especially slow to believe that their friends have acted wrongly are simply sensitive to the high prudential or moral costs of falsely believing in their friends’ guilt. Drawing on psychological work on epistemic motivation (and in particular on the notion of “need for closure”), I propose (...)
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  12. Hope: A Solution to the Puzzle of Difficult Action.Catherine Rioux - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    Pursuing difficult long-term goals typically involves encountering substantial evidence of possible future failure. If decisions to pursue such goals are serious only if one believes that one will act as one has decided, then some of our lives’ most important decisions seem to require belief against the evidence. This is the puzzle of difficult action, to which I offer a solution. I argue that serious decisions to φ do not have to give rise to a belief that one will φ, (...)
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  13.  74
    Moral animals: ideals and constraints in moral theory.Catherine Wilson - 2004 - New York: Oxford University Press.
  14. 'Compossibility, Expression, Accommodation'.Catherine Wilson - 2005 - In Donald Rutherford & J. A. Cover (eds.), Leibniz: nature and freedom. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 108--20.
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  15.  6
    Possibility, Plenitude, and the Optimal World: Rescher on Leibniz’s Cosmology.Catherine Wilson - 2008 - In Robert Almeder (ed.), Rescher Studies: A Collection of Essays on the Philosophical Work of Nicholas Rescher. De Gruyter. pp. 477-492.
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  16. Hope: Conceptual and Normative Issues.Catherine Rioux - 2021 - Philosophy Compass 16 (3).
    Hope is often seen as at once valuable and dangerous: it can fuel our motivation in the face of challenges, but can also distract us from reality and lead us to irrationality. How can we learn to “hope well,” and what does “hoping well” involve? Contemporary philosophers disagree on such normative questions about hope and also on how to define hope as a mental state. This article explores recent philosophical debates surrounding the concept of hope and the norms governing hope. (...)
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  17.  15
    L'avenir de Hegel: plasticité, temporalité, dialectique.Catherine Malabou - 1996 - Paris: J. Vrin.
    Comment la philosophie de Hegel pourrait-elle encore promettre quelque chose puisqu'elle est apparue, aux yeux des lecteurs contemporains, comme une entreprise d'annulation du temps? Le savoir absolu n'est-il pas le resultat du processus dialectique par lequel l'esprit releve toute temporalite et par la toute surprise, l'evenement se produisant toujours trop tard? D'une absence de pensee de l'avenir dans la philosophie de Hegel decoulerait une absence d'avenir de la philosophie hegelienne elle-meme. C'est contre une telle assertion que le present ouvrage s'inscrit (...)
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  18.  16
    Swillsburg City Limits.Catherine McKeen - 2004 - Polis 21 (1-2):70-92.
    At Republic 370c–372d, Plato presents us with an early polis that is self-sufficient, peaceful, cooperative, and which provides a comfortable life for its inhabitants. While Glaucon derides this polis as a ‘city for pigs’, Socrates is quick to defend its virtues characterizing it as a city which is not only ‘complete’, but a ‘true’ and ‘healthy’ city. Is Plato sincere when he lauds the city of pigs? if so, why does the city of pigs degenerate so precipitously into the luxurious (...)
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  19. Derridapocalypse.Catherine Keller & Stephen Moore - 2005 - In Yvonne Sherwood & Kevin Hart (eds.), Derrida and religion: other testaments. New York: Routledge.
     
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  20. Sexuality, pornography, and method: "Pleasure under patriarchy".Catherine A. MacKinnon - 1989 - Ethics 99 (2):314-346.
  21.  53
    Plasticity at the Dusk of Writing: Dialectic, Destruction, Deconstruction.Catherine Malabou - 2009 - Columbia University Press.
    After defining plasticity in terms of its active embodiments, Malabou applies the notion to the work of Hegel, Heidegger, Levinas, Levi-Strauss, Freud, and ...
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  22.  16
    After writing: on the liturgical consummation of philosophy.Catherine Pickstock - 1998 - Malden, Mass.: Blackwell.
    _After Writing_ provides a significant contribution to the growing genre of works which offers a challenge to modern and postmodern accounts of Christianity.
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  23.  18
    FOUR / Biopolitics and the Concept of Life.Catherine Mills - 2015 - In Vernon W. Cisney & Nicolae Morar (eds.), Biopower: Foucault and Beyond. London: University of Chicago Press. pp. 82-101.
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  24. II—Ownership, Property and Belonging: Some Lessons to Learn from Thinkers of Antiquity about Economics and Success.Catherine Rowett - forthcoming - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society.
    I explore some enlightening alternative economic theories in Plato’s Republic which help to cast doubt on standard models of rationality in economics. Starting from Socrates’ suggestion that things work best if everyone says ‘mine’ about the same things, I discuss a kind of ‘belonging’ which merits more attention in political and economic theory. This kind of belonging is not about owning property, but it can (better) explain the desire to do things for others and for the collective good. But did (...)
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  25.  16
    Human Rights and Inclusion Policies for Transgender Women in Elite Sport: The Case of Australia ‘Rules’ Football (AFL).Catherine Ordway, Matt Nichol, Damien Parry & Joanna Wall Tweedie - forthcoming - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-23.
    The discourse inside and outside of sport in Australia and abroad on the participation of transgender women in female sport focuses on the principles of fairness, equity and the safety of competitors. These concerns commonly materialise (with little evidence) labelling transgender women as ‘cheats’, dominating female sport, strategically being coached in collision sports to intentionally hurt opponents or fraudulently transitioning with the sole aim of competing in elite women’s sport. Our research examines the process by which the Australian Football League (...)
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  26. Public Health Social Work Today.Catherine W. Erwin & S. J. L. Ms - 1965 - In Karl W. Linsenmann (ed.), Proceedings. St. Louis, Lutheran Academy for Scholarship. pp. 8--13.
     
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  27.  8
    Preface.Catherine Finet & Christian Michaux (eds.) - 2001
  28.  48
    The importance of commitment for morality: How Harry Frankfurt’s concept of care contributes to Rational Choice Theory.Catherine Herfeld & Katrien Schaubroeck - 2013 - In . pp. 51-72.
    Using Rational Choice Theory to account for moral agency has always had some uncomfortable aspect to it. Economists’ attempts to include the moral dimension of behaviour either as a preference for moral behaviour or as an external constraint on self-interested choice, have been criticized for relying on tautologies or lacking a realistic picture of motivation. Homo Oeconomicus, even when conceptually enriched by all kinds of motivations, is ultimately still characterized as caring only for what lies in his interest. Amartya Sen (...)
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  29.  78
    Gender, Choice and Partiality.Catherine McKeen - 2006 - Essays in Philosophy 7 (1):29-48.
    Feminist philosophers have argued that the family, as an institution, falls short of justice and have raised concerns about the effects of the family on women and girls. Three lines of critique have focused on John Rawls’ account of the family in A Theory of Justice and Political Liberalism. First, Rawlsian liberalism fails to provide sufficiently robust protections against sexist non-public associations (including the traditional family). Second, Rawlsian liberalism fails to recognize that families, as a rule, are unfair for women (...)
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  30.  5
    Jacques Derrida: la contre-allée.Catherine Malabou & Jacques Derrida - 1999 - [Paris]: Quinzaine littéraire-Louis Vuitton. Edited by Jacques Derrida.
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  31.  4
    How to Make Impossible Decisions.Catherine M. Robb - 2024 - Angelaki 29 (1):181-191.
    In this paper, I propose that Derrida’s writing on the impossibility of justice has the potential for fruitful dialogue with Ruth Chang’s contemporary account of practical rationality. For Derrida, making a just decision must always come with a moment of undecidability, a “leap” into the unknown with an experience of doubt and anxiety that continues to “haunt” the decision-maker. By contrast, in her work on rationality, Chang proposes that hard decisions are difficult to make because the alternatives are “on a (...)
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  32. A Higher-Order Approach to Diachronic Continence.Catherine Rioux - 2022 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 11 (1):51-58.
    We often form intentions to resist anticipated future temptations. But when confronted with the temptations our resolutions were designed to withstand, we tend to revise our previous evaluative judgments and conclude that we should now succumb—only to then revert to our initial evaluations, once temptation has subsided. Some evaluative judgments made under the sway of temptation are mistaken. But not all of them are. When the belief that one should now succumb is a proper response to relevant considerations that have (...)
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  33.  59
    Between the absolute and the arbitrary.Catherine Z. Elgin - 1997 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    In Between the Absolute and the Arbitrary, Catherine Z. Elgin maps a constructivist alternative to the standard Anglo-American conception of philosophy's ...
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  34.  10
    Enigmatic Experiences: Spirit, Complexity, and Person.Catherine Keller - 2011 - In J. Wentzel Van Huyssteen & Erik P. Wiebe (eds.), In search of self: interdisciplinary perspectives on personhood. Grand Rapids, Mich.: W.B. Eerdmans. pp. 301.
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  35.  3
    Humane homes.Catherine Robertson - 2020 - New York: Rosen Publishing.
    Our homes are where we live and play, and for those making positive vegan choices, it's important for our domestic spaces to be environmentally friendly and cruelty-free. This book provides practical advice and inspiration to everyone who is building or renovating and wants a home that both supports their lifestyle and benefits the planet. Topics include making intelligent choices on appliances and creating butterfly-friendly gardens. With ideas, tips, and guidelines for every aspect of home design, readers will see how easy (...)
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  36. Catherine Z. Elgin.Catherine Z. Elgin - 1998 - In Linda Alcoff (ed.), Epistemology: the big questions. Malden, Mass.: Blackwell. pp. 26.
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  37.  1
    Mary Wollstonecraft and Political Economy: The Feminist Critique of Commercial Modernity.Catherine Packham - 2024 - Cambridge University Press.
    Why was Wollstonecraft's landmark feminist work, the Vindication of the Rights of Woman, categorised as a work of political economy when it was first published? Taking this question as a starting point, Mary Wollstonecraft and Political Economy gives a compelling new account of Wollstonecraft as critic of the material, moral, social, and psychological conditions of commercial modernity. Offering thorough analysis of Wollstonecraft's major writings - including her two Vindications, her novels, her history of the French Revolution, and her travel writing (...)
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  38. The Illusory Nature of Leibniz's System.Catherine Wilson - 1999 - In Rocco J. Gennaro & Charles Huenemann (eds.), New essays on the rationalists. New York: Oxford University Press.
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  39.  3
    Return to the City to Claim It: Temporalities and Locations of Feminist Refusal.Catherine Koekoek - 2024 - Res Pública. Revista de Historia de Las Ideas Políticas 27 (1):23-29.
    One of the main contributions of A Feminist Theory of Refusal is its connection of everyday action and prefigurative practices with an explicit commitment to structural change. But how such change happens, and what kind of relations it implies between ‘the city’ (as the existing political community) and feminist heterotopias of refusal, remains unclear. Reading Honig’s work as a prefigurative theory, I argue that it links moments of doing-otherwise with moments of institutional politics, sparking questions about the conditions of a (...)
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  40. Eriugena the exegete : hermeneutics in a biblical context.Catherine Kavanagh - 2020 - In Adrian Guiu (ed.), A companion to John Scottus Eriugena. Boston: Brill.
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  41. Human-managed soils and soil-managed humans: An interactive account of perspectival realism for soil management.Catherine Kendig - 2024 - Journal of Social Ontology 10 (2).
    What is philosophically interesting about how soil is managed and categorized? This paper begins by investigating how different soil ontologies develop and change as they are used within different social communities. Analyzing empirical evidence from soil science, ethnopedology, sociology, and agricultural extension reveals that efforts to categorize soil are not limited to current scientific soil classifications but also include those based in social ontologies of soil. I examine three of these soil social ontologies: (1) local and Indigenous classifications farmers and (...)
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  42.  4
    Habits in Perception: A Diachronic Defense of Hyperinferentialism.Catherine Legg - 2022 - In Jeremy Dunham & Komarine Romdenh-Romluc (eds.), Habit and the History of Philosophy. New York, NY: Rewriting the History of Philosophy. pp. 243-260.
    This paper explores how Charles Peirce’s habit-based epistemology leads him to theorise perception. I show how Peirce’s triadic semiotic analysis of perceptual judgment renders his theory of perception neither a representationalism nor a relationism /direct realism, but an interesting hybrid of the two. His view is also extremely interesting, I argue, in the way that by analysing symbols as habits it refuses the common assumption that perception is an affair best understood synchronically, as a ‘language-entry event’. Relatedly, I extend previous (...)
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  43.  37
    Postfeminism, popular feminism and neoliberal feminism? Sarah Banet-Weiser, Rosalind Gill and Catherine Rottenberg in conversation.Catherine Rottenberg, Rosalind Gill & Sarah Banet-Weiser - 2020 - Feminist Theory 21 (1):3-24.
    In this unconventional article, Sarah Banet-Weiser, Rosalind Gill and Catherine Rottenberg conduct a three-way ‘conversation’ in which they all take turns outlining how they understand the relationship among postfeminism, popular feminism and neoliberal feminism. It begins with a short introduction, and then Ros, Sarah and Catherine each define the term they have become associated with. This is followed by another round in which they discuss the overlaps, similarities and disjunctures among the terms, and the article ends with how (...)
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  44. Tissue Economies: Blood, Organs, and Cell Lines in Late Capitalism.Catherine Waldby & Robert Mitchell - 2007 - Science and Society 71 (4):504-506.
     
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  45.  3
    Cratyle.Catherine Plato & Dalimier - 1998 - Flammarion.
    Quelle est l'intention de Platon lorsqu'il fait de Socrate un virtuose de l'étymologie dans le Cratyle? Préciser les rapports entre la " science des lettres " qui se constitue en son siècle et la nouvelle théorie des Idées qu'il élabore. Socrate s'entretient avec le jeune Hermogène puis avec l'énigmatique Cratyle des rapports entre les mots et les choses. La rectitude des noms est-elle affaire de convention, ainsi que le soutient Hermogène? Ou s'agit-il d'un accord " naturel ", comme le prétend (...)
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  46.  3
    Christianity.Catherine Keller - 1998 - In Alison M. Jaggar & Iris Marion Young (eds.), A companion to feminist philosophy. Malden, Mass.: Blackwell. pp. 223–235.
    Unlike the nontheological articles, this one must, for the sake of its coherence in this volume, define its basic discipline before its specific feminism can be articulated. Theology, “god‐word,” a term coined by the pagan Plato, became the language game of Christian intellectuals within a century of the death of Jesus of Nazareth. This Jewish life, its premature termination, and the virtually unprecedented spread of the spiritual movement he had initiated managed to attract philosophical minds such as Clement of Alexandria (...)
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  47.  6
    Relativism in Plato's Protagoras.Catherine Rowett - 2013 - In Verity Harte & Melissa Lane (eds.), Politeia in Greek and Roman Philosophy. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 191-211.
    The character Protagoras in Plato's Protagoras holds similar views to the one in the Theaetetus, and faces similar problems. The dialogue considers issues in epistemology and moral epistemology, as a central theme. The Protagorean position is immune from Socrates' attacks, and Socrates needs Protagorean methods to make any impact.
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  48. Ecological Psychology and Enactivism: Perceptually-Guided Action vs. Sensation-Based Enaction1.Catherine Read & Agnes Szokolszky - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11:532803.
    Ecological Psychology and Enactivism both challenge representationist cognitive science, but the two approaches have only begun to engage in dialogue. Further conceptual clarification is required in which differences are as important as common ground. This paper enters the dialogue by focusing on important differences. After a brief account of the parallel histories of Ecological Psychology and Enactivism, we cover incompatibility between them regarding their theories of sensation and perception. First, we show how and why in ecological theory perception is, crucially, (...)
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  49. Religion and Politics in Nicaragua: A Historical Ethnography Set in the City of Masaya.Catherine Stanford - 2008 - Dissertation, State University of New York (Suny)
    UMI Number: 3319553 This study is a historical ethnography of religious diversity in post-revolutionary Nicaragua from the vantage point of Catholics who live in the city of Masaya located on the Pacific side of Nicaragua at the end of the twentieth century. My overarching research question is: How may ethnographically observed patterns in Catholic religious practices in contemporary Nicaragua be understood in historical context? Utilizing anthropological theory and method grounded in Weberian historical theory, I explore Catholic ritual as contested politico-religious (...)
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  50. Mechanisms in psychology: ripping nature at its seams.Catherine Stinson - 2016 - Synthese 193 (5).
    Recent extensions of mechanistic explanation into psychology suggest that cognitive models are only explanatory insofar as they map neatly onto, and serve as scaffolding for more detailed neural models. Filling in those neural details is what these accounts take the integration of cognitive psychology and neuroscience to mean, and they take this process to be seamless. Critics of this view have given up on cognitive models possibly explaining mechanistically in the course of arguing for cognitive models having explanatory value independent (...)
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