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  1.  44
    Misunderstood Gestures: Iconatrophy and the Reception of Greek Sculpture in the Roman Imperial Period.Catherine M. Keesling - 2005 - Classical Antiquity 24 (1):41-79.
    Anthropologists have defined iconatrophy as a process by which oral traditions originate as explanations for objects that, through the passage of time, have ceased to make sense to their viewers. One form of iconatrophy involves the misinterpretation of statues' identities, iconography, or locations. Stories that ultimately derive from such misunderstandings of statues are Monument-Novellen, a term coined by Herodotean studies. Applying the concept of iconatrophy to Greek sculpture of the Archaic and Classical periods yields three possible examples in which statues (...)
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  2.  24
    Female Portrait Statues (S.) Dillon The Female Portrait Statue in the Greek World. Pp. Xvi + 254, Ills. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Cased, £55, US$90. ISBN: 978-0-521-76450-6. [REVIEW]Catherine M. Keesling - 2011 - The Classical Review 61 (2):597-598.
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  3.  12
    (E.) Greco Ed. Topografia di Atene: Sviluppo urbano e monumenti dalle origini al III secolo d. C., Tomo 1: Acropoli–Areopago–Tra Acropoli e Pnice (Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Atene 1). Athens and Paestum: Pandemos, 2010. Pp. 303, illus. €90. 97888-87744347. [REVIEW]Catherine M. Keesling - 2012 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 132:255-256.
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  4. 1. Helen Epigrammatopoios Helen Epigrammatopoios (Pp. 1-39).David F. Elmer, Catherine M. Keesling, Leslie Kurke & Gottfried Mader - 2005 - Classical Antiquity 24 (1).