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Catherine Joanna Rowett
University of East Anglia
  1.  6
    Knowledge and Truth in Plato: Stepping Past the Shadow of Socrates.Catherine Rowett - 2018 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Catherine Rowett presents an in depth study of Plato's Meno, Republic and Theaetetus and offers both a coherent argument that the project in which Plato was engaging has been widely misunderstood and misrepresented, and detailed new readings of particular thorny issues in the interpretation of these classic texts.
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  2.  35
    The Pythagorean Society and Politics.Catherine Rowett - 2014 - In Carl Huffman (ed.), A History of Pythagoreanism. Cambridge University Press. pp. 112-130.
    Pythagoreans dominated the political scene in southern Italy for nearly a century in the late 6th to 5th century BC. What was the secret of their political success and can their political, social and economic policies be assessed in the customary terms with which historians try to analyse ancient societies? I argue that they cannot, and that the Pythagorean approach to politics was sui generis, and successful because it was based on ideas, not force or popular demagogy.
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  3. Why the Philosopher Kings Will Believe the Noble Lie.Catherine Rowett - 2016 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 50:67-100.
  4.  21
    Love, Sex and the Gods: Why Things Have Divine Names in Empedocles’ Poem, and Why They Come in Pairs.Catherine Rowett - 2016 - Rhizomata 4 (1):80-110.
  5. On Making Mistakes in Plato: Thaeatetus 187c-200d.Catherine Rowett - 2012 - Topoi 31 (2):151-166.
    In this paper I explore a famous part of Plato’s Theaetetus where Socrates develops various models of the mind (picturing it first as a wax tablet and then as an aviary full of specimen birds). These are to solve some puzzles about how it is possible to make a mistake. On my interpretation, defended here, the discussion of mistakes is no digression, but is part of the refutation of Theaetetus’s thesis that knowledge is “true doxa”. It reveals that false doxa (...)
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  6.  27
    On Calling the Gods by the Right Names.Catherine Rowett - 2013 - Rhizomata 1 (2):168-193.
    Do you need to know the name of the god you're praying to? If you get the name wrong what happens to the prayer? What if the god has more than one name? Who gets to decide whether the name works (you or the god or neither)? What are names anyway? Are the names of the gods any different in how they work from any other names? Is there a way of fixing the reference without using the name so as (...)
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  7. Christopher Stead.Catherine Rowett - 2013 - Studia Patristica 53 (1):17-30.
    Professor Christopher Stead was Ely Professor of Divinity from 1971 until his retirement in 1980 and one of the great contributors to the Oxford Patristic Conferences for many years. In this paper I reflect on his work in Patristics, and I attempt to understand how his interests diverged from the other major contributors in the same period, and how they were formed by his philosophical milieu and the spirit of the age. As a case study to illustrate and diagnose his (...)
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  8.  7
    On Being Reminded of Heraclitus by the Motifs in Plato’s Phaedo.Catherine Rowett - 2017 - In Enrica Fantino, Ulrike Muss, Charlotte Schubert & Kurt Sier (eds.), Heraklit Im Kontext. De Gruyter. pp. 373-414.
    In this paper I argue that we can better understand Plato’s Phaedo, if we don’t concentrate solely on the hints of Pythagoreanism among the characters and their doctrines, as though that were the principal key to the dialogue’s dialec- tical targets. I suggest that the dialogue is intended to make us think of the meta-physics of at least one other Presocratic predecessor, besides any Pythagorean influence (which may be much less than has been thought). Not least among the thinkers of (...)
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  9.  38
    Philosophy's Numerical Turn: Why the Pythagoreans' Interest in Numbers is Truly Awesome.Catherine Rowett - 2013 - In Dirk Obbink & David Sider (eds.), Doctrine and Doxography: Studies on Heraclitus and Pythagoras. De Gruyter. pp. 3-32.
    Philosophers are generally somewhat wary of the hints of number mysticism in the reports about the beliefs and doctrines of the so-called Pythagoreans. It's not clear how much Pythagoras himself (as opposed to his later followers) indulged in speculation about numbers, or in more serious mathematics. But the Pythagoreans whom Aristotle discusses in the Metaphysics had some elaborate stories to tell about how the universe could be explained in terms of numbers—not just its physics but perhaps morality too. Was this (...)
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  10.  12
    Analytic Philosophy, the Ancient Philosopher Poets and the Poetics of Analytic Philosophy.Catherine Rowett - 2021 - Rhizomata 8 (2):158-182.
    The paper starts with reflections on Plato’s critique of the poets and the preference many express for Aristotle’s view of poetry. The second part of the paper takes a case study of analytic treatments of ancient philosophy, including the ancient philosopher poets, to examine the poetics of analytic philosophy, diagnosing a preference in Analytic philosophy for a clean non-poetic style of presentation, and then develops this in considering how well historians of philosophy in the Analytic tradition can accommodate the contributions (...)
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  11.  22
    A Portable Presocratics Primer? [REVIEW]Catherine Rowett - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (4):791-797.
  12. Relativism in Plato's Protagoras.Catherine Rowett - 2013 - In Verity Harte & Melissa Lane (eds.), Politeia in Greek and Roman Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 191-211.
    The character Protagoras in Plato's Protagoras holds similar views to the one in the Theaetetus, and faces similar problems. The dialogue considers issues in epistemology and moral epistemology, as a central theme. The Protagorean position is immune from Socrates' attacks, and Socrates needs Protagorean methods to make any impact.
     
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  13.  9
    Thales.Catherine Rowett - 2021 - The Philosophers' Magazine 92:58-63.
  14.  6
    Introduction.Catherine Rowett - 2021 - Rhizomata 8 (2):149-157.
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  15. Plato, Wittgenstein and the Definition of Games.Catherine Rowett - 2013 - In Luigi Perissinotto & Begoña Ramón Cámara (eds.), Wittgenstein and Plato: connections, comparisons and contrasts. Palgrave. pp. 196-219.
    In this paper I argue, controversially, that Plato's Meno anticipates Wittgenstein's critique of essentialism. Plato is usually read as an essentialist of the very kind that Wittgenstein was challenging, and the Meno in particular is usually taken as evidence that Plato thought that to know something you must be able to define it, and that if you can't define it you can't investigate any other questions on the topic. I suggest instead that Plato shows Socrates proposing such a position (much (...)
     
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  16.  32
    Literary Genres and Judgements of Taste: Some Remarks on Aristotle's Remarks About the Poetry of Empedocles.Catherine Rowett - 2013 - In Erler Michael (ed.), Argument Und Literarische Form in Antiker Philosophie. De Gruyter. pp. 305-314.
    In this paper I review four texts in which Aristotle comments on Empedocles ' writing style. I show that Aristotle thought that Empedocles was a fine poet. That is fine, if a poet is what you want.
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  17.  1
    Philosophical Reflections on the Idea of a Universal Basic Income.Catherine Rowett - 2022 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 91:81-102.
    A universal basic income is an unconditional allowance, sufficient to live on, paid in cash to every citizen regardless of income. It has been a Green Party policy for years. But the idea raises many interesting philosophical questions, about fairness, entitlement, desert, stigma and sanctions, the value of unpaid work, the proper ambitions of a good society, and our preconceptions about whether leisure or jobs are the thing we should prize above all for free citizens. Coming from the perspective of (...)
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  18.  17
    J. Bryan Likeness and Likelihood in the Presocratics and Plato. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, . Pp. 210. £55/$95. 9780521762946. [REVIEW]Catherine Rowett - 2014 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 134:261-262.