13 found
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  1.  6
    From Reproductive Work to Regenerative Labour: The Female Body and the Stem Cell Industries.Melinda Cooper & Catherine Waldby - 2010 - Feminist Theory 11 (1):3-22.
    The identification and valorization of unacknowledged, feminized forms of economic productivity has been an important task for feminist theory. In this article, we expand and rethink existing definitions of labour, in order to recognize the essential economic role women play in the stem cell and regenerative medicine industries, new fields of biomedical research that are rapidly expanding throughout the world. Women constitute the primary tissue donors in the new stem cell industries, which require high volumes of human embryos, oöcytes, foetal (...)
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  2.  1
    Biomedicine, Tissue Transfer and Intercorporeality.Catherine Waldby - 2002 - Feminist Theory 3 (3):239-254.
    More and more areas of medicine involve subjects donating tissues to another — blood, organs, bone marrow, sperm, ova and embryos can all be transferred from one person to another. Within the technical frameworks of biomedicine, such fragments are generally treated as detachable things, severed from social identity once they are removed from a particular body. However an abundant anthropological and sociological literature has found that, for donors and patients, human tissues are not impersonal. They retain some of the values (...)
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  3.  66
    Informed Consent and Fresh Egg Donation for Stem Cell Research: Incorporating Embodied Knowledge Into Ethical Decision-Making.Katherine Carroll & Catherine Waldby - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):29-39.
    This article develops a model of informed consent for fresh oöcyte donation for stem cell research, during in vitro fertilisation (IVF), by building on the importance of patients’ embodied experience. Informed consent typically focuses on the disclosure of material information. Yet this approach does not incorporate the embodied knowledge that patients acquire through lived experience. Drawing on interview data from 35 patients and health professionals in an IVF clinic in Australia, our study demonstrates the uncertainty of IVF treatment, and the (...)
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  4.  10
    The Deadly Business of an Unregulated Global Stem Cell Industry.Tamra Lysaght, Wendy Lipworth, Tereza Hendl, Ian Kerridge, Tsung-Ling Lee, Megan Munsie, Catherine Waldby & Cameron Stewart - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (11):744-746.
    In 2016, the Office of the State Coroner of New South Wales released its report into the death of an Australian woman, Sheila Drysdale, who had died from complications of an autologous stem cell procedure at a Sydney clinic. In this report, we argue that Mrs Drysdale's death was avoidable, and it was the result of a pernicious global problem of an industry exploiting regulatory systems to sell unproven and unjustified interventions with stem cells.
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  5.  3
    Revenants: The Visible Human Project and the Digital Uncanny.Catherine Waldby - 1997 - Body and Society 3 (1):1-16.
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  6.  24
    Virtual Anatomy: From the Body in the Text to the Body on the Screen. [REVIEW]Catherine Waldby - 2000 - Journal of Medical Humanities 21 (2):85-107.
    This paper analyzes the transformations in anatomical representation introduced by the Visible Human Project, the first complete virtual anatomy object. By comparing the process of production of book based classical anatomy with that of the Visible Human Project, the paper identifies the medium specificity of anatomical knowledge, the extent to which its powers of demonstration and analysis are conditioned by the medium in which they take place. The paper argues that anatomy can be productively thought of as a kind of (...)
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  7.  16
    Our Posthuman Future: Discussing the Consequences of Biotechnological Advances.Susan Squier & Catherine Waldby - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (4):4.
  8.  40
    Multidisciplinary Perspectives on the Donation of Stem Cells and Reproductive Tissue.Catherine Waldby, Ian Kerridge & Loane Skene - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):15-17.
    Multidisciplinary Perspectives on the Donation of Stem Cells and Reproductive Tissue Content Type Journal Article Category Symposium Pages 15-17 DOI 10.1007/s11673-011-9351-x Authors Catherine Waldby, School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia Ian Kerridge, Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine, Medical Foundation Building (K25), University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia Loane Skene, Faculty of Law and Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Studies, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VA, Australia Journal Journal of Bioethical Inquiry (...)
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  9. Medicine: The Ethics of Care, the Subject of Experiment. [REVIEW]Catherine Waldby - 2012 - Body and Society 18 (3-4):179-192.
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  10. National Biobanks: Clinical Labor, Risk Production, and the Creation of Biovalue.Catherine Waldby & Robert Mitchell - 2010 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 35 (3):330-355.
    The development of genomics has dramatically expanded the scope of genetic research, and collections of genetic biosamples have proliferated in countries with active genomics research programs. In this essay, we consider a particular kind of collection, national biobanks. National biobanks are often presented by advocates as an economic ‘‘resource’’ that will be used by both basic researchers and academic biologists, as well as by pharmaceutical diagnostic and clinical genomics companies. Although national biobanks have been the subject of intense interest in (...)
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  11.  6
    Screening the Body: Tracing Medicine's Visual Culture by Lisa Cartwright.Catherine Waldby - 1996 - Body and Society 2 (4):117-119.
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  12. Tissue Economies: Blood, Organs, and Cell Lines in Late Capitalism.Catherine Waldby & Robert Mitchell - 2007 - Science and Society 71 (4):504-506.
     
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  13. The Instruments of Life: Frankenstein and Cyberculture.Catherine Waldby - 2002 - In D. Tofts, A. Jonson & A. Cavallaro (eds.), Prefiguring Cyberculture: An Intellectual History. MIT Press. pp. 28--37.
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