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Catherine Wilson [173]Catherine Warren Wilson [1]
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Catherine Wilson
CUNY Graduate Center
Catherine Wilson
The Graduate Center, CUNY
  1. Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory.Sandra Lee Bartky, Paul Benson, Sue Campbell, Claudia Card, Robin S. Dillon, Jean Harvey, Karen Jones, Charles W. Mills, James Lindemann Nelson, Margaret Urban Walker, Rebecca Whisnant & Catherine Wilson - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Moral psychology studies the features of cognition, judgement, perception and emotion that make human beings capable of moral action. Perspectives from feminist and race theory immensely enrich moral psychology. Writers who take these perspectives ask questions about mind, feeling, and action in contexts of social difference and unequal power and opportunity. These essays by a distinguished international cast of philosophers explore moral psychology as it connects to social life, scientific studies, and literature.
     
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  2.  20
    Perceptual Acquaintance From Descartes to Reid. [REVIEW]Catherine Wilson - 1986 - Philosophical Review 95 (1):105.
  3.  91
    Epicureanism at the Origins of Modernity.Catherine Wilson - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    This landmark study examines the role played by the rediscovery of the writings of the ancient atomists, Epicurus and Lucretius, in the articulation of the major philosophical systems of the seventeenth century, and, more broadly, their influence on the evolution of natural science and moral and political philosophy. The target of sustained and trenchant philosophical criticism by Cicero, and of opprobrium by the Christian Fathers of the early Church, for its unflinching commitment to the absence of divine supervision and the (...)
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  4. The Invisible World: Early Modern Philosophy and the Invention of the Microscope.Catherine Wilson - 1995 - Journal of the History of Biology 29 (3):466-468.
     
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  5. Moral Progress Without Moral Realism.Catherine Wilson - 2010 - Philosophical Papers 39 (1):97-116.
    This paper argues that we can acknowledge the existence of moral truths and moral progress without being committed to moral realism. Rather than defending this claim through the more familiar route of the attempted analysis of the ontological commitments of moral claims, I show how moral belief change for the better shares certain features with theoretical progress in the natural sciences. Proponents of the better theory are able to convince their peers that it is formally and empirically superior to its (...)
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  6. On Some Alledged Limitations to Moral Endeavor.Catherine Wilson - 1993 - Journal of Philosophy 90 (6):275-289.
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  7.  15
    Consciousness as a Biological Phenomenon.Catherine Wilson - 2018 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 25:71-87.
    Reversing centuries of methodological caution and skepticism, philosophers have begun to explore the possibility that experience in some form is widely distributed in the universe. It has been proposed that consciousness may pertain to machines, rocks, elementary particles, and perhaps the universe itself. This paper shows why philosophers have good reason to suppose that experiences are widely distributed in living nature, including worms and insects, but why panpsychism extending to non-living nature is an implausible doctrine.
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  8. Kontinuität Und Mechanismus: Zur Philosophie des Jungen Leibniz in Ihrem Ideengeschichtlichen Kontext. [REVIEW]Richard Arthur, Christia Mercer, Justin Smith & Catherine Wilson - 1997 - The Leibniz Review 7:25-64.
  9. V—Moral Truth: Observational or Theoretical?Catherine Wilson - 2011 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (1pt1):97-114.
    Moral properties are widely held to be response‐dependent properties of actions, situations, events and persons. There is controversy as to whether the putative response‐dependence of these properties nullifies any truth‐claims for moral judgements, or rather supports them. The present paper argues that moral judgements are more profitably compared with theoretical judgements in the natural sciences than with the judgements of immediate sense‐perception. The notion of moral truth is dependent on the notion of moral knowledge, which in turn is best understood (...)
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  10. Leibniz's Metaphysics.Catherine Wilson - 1989 - Princeton Up.
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  11. The Moral Epistemology of Locke's Essay.Catherine Wilson - 2007 - In Lex Newman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Locke's "Essay Concerning Human Understanding". Cambridge University Press.
  12. Lucretius and the History of Science.Monte Ransome Johnson & Catherine Wilson - 2007 - In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.
    An overview of the influence of Lucretius poem On the Nature of Things (De Rerum Natura) on the renaissance and scientific revolution of the seventeenth century, and an examination of its continuing influence over physical atomism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
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  13.  75
    Two Opponents of Material Atomism.Catherine Wilson - 2007 - In P. Phemister & S. Brown (eds.), Leibniz and the English-Speaking World. Springer. pp. 35--50.
  14.  71
    The Cambridge Companion to Malebranche. [REVIEW]Catherine Wilson & Steven Nadler - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (1):108.
    The French philosopher and theologian Nicholas Malebranche was one of the most important thinkers of the early modern period. A bold and unorthodox thinker, he tried to synthesize the new philosophy of Descartes with the religious Platonism of St. Augustine. This is the first collection of essays to address Malebranche's thought comprehensively and systematically. There are chapters devoted to Malebranche's metaphysics, his doctrine of the soul, his epistemology, the celebrated debate with Arnauld, his philosophical method, his occasionalism and theory of (...)
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  15.  82
    Literature and Knowledge.Catherine Wilson - 1983 - Philosophy 58 (226):489 - 496.
    There is probably no subject in the philosophy of art which has prompted more impassioned theorizing than the question of the ‘cognitive value’ of works of art. ‘In the end’, one influential critic has stated, ‘I do not distinguish between science and art except as regards method. Both provide us with a view of reality and both are indispensable to a complete understanding of the universe.’ If a man is not prepared to distinguish between science and art one may well (...)
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  16.  84
    Plenitude and Compossibility in Leibniz.Catherine Wilson - 2000 - The Leibniz Review 10:1-20.
    Leibniz entertained the idea that, as a set of “striving possibles” competes for existence, the largest and most perfect world comes into being. The paper proposes 8 criteria for a Leibniz-world. It argues that a) there is no algorithm e.g., one involving pairwise compossibility-testing that can produce even possible Leibniz-worlds; b) individual substances presuppose completed worlds; c) the uniqueness of the actual world is a matter of theological preference, not an outcome of the assembly-process; and d) Goedel’s theorem implies that (...)
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  17.  28
    Another Darwinian Aesthetics.Catherine Wilson - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (3):237-252.
    I offer a Darwinian perspective on the existence of aesthetic interests, tastes, preferences, and productions. It is distinguished from the approaches of Denis Dutton and Geoffrey Miller, drawing instead on Richard O. Prum's notion of biotic artworlds. The relevance of neuroaesthetics to the philosophy of art is defended.
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  18.  87
    Darwin and Nietzsche.Catherine Wilson - 2013 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (2):354-370.
  19.  63
    Love of God and Love of Creatures: The Masham-Astell Debate.Catherine Wilson - 2004 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 21 (3):281 - 298.
  20. Epicureanism: A Very Short Introduction.Catherine Wilson - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Epicureanism is commonly associated with a carefree view of life and the pursuit of pleasures, particularly the pleasures of the table. However it was a complex and distinctive system of philosophy that emphasized simplicity and moderation, and considered nature to consist of atoms and the void. Epicureanism is a school of thought whose legacy continues to reverberate today.In this Very Short Introduction, Catherine Wilson explains the key ideas of the School, comparing them with those of the rival Stoics and with (...)
     
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  21.  22
    Managing Expectations: Locke on the Material Mind and Moral Mediocrity.Catherine Wilson - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:127-146.
    Locke's insistence on the limits of knowledge and the ‘mediocrity’ of our epistemological equipment is well understood; it is rightly seen as integrated with his causal theory of ideas and his theory of judgment. Less attention has been paid to the mediocrity theme as it arises in his theory of moral agency. Locke sees definite limits to human willpower. This is in keeping with post-Puritan theology with its new emphasis on divine mercy as opposed to divine justice and recrimination. It (...)
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  22.  23
    Hume and Vital Materialism.Catherine Wilson - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (5):1002-1021.
    ABSTRACTHume was not a philosopher famed for what are sometimes called ‘ontological commitments'. Nevertheless, few contemporary scholars doubt that Hume was an atheist, and the present essay tenders the view that Hume was favourably disposed to the 'vital materialism' of post-Newtonian natural philosophers in England, Scotland and France. Both internalist arguments, collating passages from a range of Hume's works, and externalist arguments, reviewing the likely sources of his knowledge of ancient materialism and his association with his materialistic contemporaries are employed.
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  23.  42
    The Doors of Perception and the Artist Within.Catherine Wilson - 2015 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 89 (1):1-20.
    This paper discusses the significance for the philosophy of perception and aesthetics of certain productions of the ‘offline brain’. These are experienced in hypnagogic and other trance states, and in disease- or drug-induced hallucination. They bear a similarity to other visual patterns in nature, and reappear in human artistry, especially of the craft type. The reasons behind these resonances are explored, along with the question why we are disposed to find geometrical complexity and ‘supercolouration’ beautiful. The paper concludes with a (...)
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  24. Descartes and the Corporeal Mind: Some Implications of the Regius Affair.Catherine Wilson - 2000 - In John Schuster, Stephen Gaukroger & John Sutton (eds.), Descartes' Natural Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 659--79.
     
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  25.  21
    Plenitude and Compossibility in Leibniz.Catherine Wilson - 2000 - The Leibniz Review 10:1-20.
    Leibniz entertained the idea that, as a set of “striving possibles” competes for existence, the largest and most perfect world comes into being. The paper proposes 8 criteria for a Leibniz-world. It argues that a) there is no algorithm e.g., one involving pairwise compossibility-testing that can produce even possible Leibniz-worlds; b) individual substances presuppose completed worlds; c) the uniqueness of the actual world is a matter of theological preference, not an outcome of the assembly-process; and d) Goedel’s theorem implies that (...)
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  26.  64
    Leibniz and Atomism.Catherine Wilson - 1982 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 13 (3):175.
  27. Leibnizian Optimism.Catherine Wilson - 1983 - Journal of Philosophy 80 (11):765-783.
  28.  71
    Margaret Dauler Wilson: A Life in Philosophy.Catherine Wilson - 1999 - The Leibniz Review 9:1-15.
    Margaret Wilson, who died last year, has been described as the most eminent English-language historian of early modern philosophy of her generation. She was President of the Leibniz Society of North America for four years, from 1986 to 1990. Within this organization she is remembered both for her contributions to Leibniz-studies and for her attention to and support of younger researchers and her governing role in the Society. Her Harvard Ph.D. dissertation on “Leibniz’s Doctrine of Necessary Truth,” written under the (...)
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  29.  71
    The Fold: Leibniz and the Baroque.Catherine Wilson - 1993 - The Leibniz Review 3:1-2.
    In this fascinating but sometimes baffling book, the reader engages with a series of conditionals like the following: “If [the psychiatrist] Clérimbault manifests a delirium, it is because he discovers the tiny hallucinatory perceptions of ether addicts in the folds of clothing”. “If Leibniz’s principles [of identity and sufficient reason] appear to us as cries, it is because each one signals the presence of a class of beings that are themselves crying and draw attention to themselves by these cries...”. Deleuze’s (...)
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  30.  19
    Ideas and Animals: The Hard Problem of Leibnizian Metaphysics.Glenn A. Hartz & Catherine Wilson - 2005 - Studia Leibnitiana 37 (1):1 - 19.
    Die Ansicht, dass Leibniz urn 1700 oder einige Zeit danach ein überzeugter Idealist war oder wurde, der allein an die Realität der Geister und ihrer Ideen glaubte, hält sich merkwürdigerweise in der neueren Sekundärliteratur. In diesem Beitrag beurteilen wir die Textgrundlage für diese Behauptung nach von uns für solide gehaltenen Kriterien einer historischen Interpretation, wobei sich die Behauptung unserer Ansicht nach als unzureichend erweist. Obwohl Leibniz zur Überzeugung gelangt war, dass wirkliche "Atome" der Natur keine Ausdehnung hätten, war er sein (...)
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  31. De Ipsa Natura: Leibniz on Substance, Force and Activity.Catherine Wilson - 1987 - Studia Leibnitiana 19:148.
     
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  32.  51
    Reply to Cover’s 1993 Review of Leibniz’s Metaphysics.Catherine Wilson - 1994 - The Leibniz Review 4:5-8.
    It is an honor to have been given the opportunity by the editor to reply to J.A. Cover’s review of Leibniz’s Metaphysics, and to have a chance to revisit, five years after the book’s publication, the still-active battleground of intrinsic and extrinsic properties, the extensionality and intensionality of perception, and the reality of aggregates and to say more, a little informally perhaps, about about some methodological questions in Leibniz scholarship. Cover’s review when it appeared gave me a great deal of (...)
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  33.  53
    Prospects for Non-Cognitivism.Catherine Wilson - 2001 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 44 (3):291 – 314.
    This essay offers a defence of the non-cognitivist approach to the interpretation of moral judgments as disguised imperatives corresponding to social rules. It addresses the body of criticism that faced R. M. Hare, and that currently faces moral anti-realists, on two levels, by providing a full semantic analysis of evaluative judgments and by arguing that anti-realism is compatible with moral aspiration despite the non-existence of obligations as the externalist imagines them. A moral judgment consists of separate descriptive and prescriptive components (...)
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  34.  22
    Epicureanism in the Early Modern Period.Catherine Wilson - 2009 - In James Warren (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Epicureanism. Cambridge University Press. pp. 266.
  35.  63
    Moral Animals: Ideals and Constraints in Moral Theory.Catherine Wilson - 2004 - International Phenomenological Society.
    In Moral Animals, Catherine Wilson develops a theory of morality based on two fundamental premises: first that moral progress implies the evolution of moral ideals involving restraint and sacrifice; second that human beings are outfitted by nature with selfish motivations, intentions, and ambitions that place constraints on what morality can demand of them. Normative claims, she goes on to show, can be understood as projective hypotheses concerning the conduct of realistically-described nonideal agents in preferred fictional worlds. Such claims differ from (...)
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  36.  54
    Savagery and the Supersensible: Kant's Universalism in Historical Context.Catherine Wilson - 1998 - History of European Ideas 24 (4-5):315-330.
  37.  20
    Evolutionary Ethics.Catherine Wilson - 2007 - In Mohan Matthen & Christopher Stephens (eds.), Philosophy of Biology. Elsevier. pp. 219.
  38. 'Compossibility, Expression, Accommodation'.Catherine Wilson - 2005 - In Donald Rutherford J. A. Cover (ed.), Leibniz: Nature and Freedom. Oxford University Press. pp. 108--20.
     
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  39.  19
    13 The Reception of Leibniz in the Eighteenth Century.Catherine Wilson - 1995 - In Nicholas Jolley (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Leibniz. Cambridge University Press. pp. 442.
  40. Descartes's Meditations: An Introduction.Catherine Wilson - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this introduction to a classic philosophical text, Catherine Wilson examines the arguments of Descartes' famous Meditations, the book which launched modern philosophy. Drawing on the reinterpretations of Descartes' thought of the past twenty-five years, she shows how Descartes constructs a theory of the mind, the body, nature, and God from a premise of radical uncertainty. She discusses in detail the historical context of Descartes' writings and their relationship to early modern science, and at the same time she introduces concepts (...)
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  41.  48
    Motion, Sensation, and the Infinite: The Lasting Impression of Hobbes on Leibniz.Catherine Wilson - 1997 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 5 (2):339 – 351.
  42.  62
    Report on the 2004 Montreal Nouveaux Essais Conference.Catherine Wilson - 2004 - The Leibniz Review 14:173-174.
  43.  30
    Book ReviewsClaudia Card,, Ed. The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993. Pp. Xxii+336. $60.00 ; $22.00. [REVIEW]Catherine Wilson - 2005 - Ethics 115 (2):389-393.
  44.  1
    Leibniz's Metaphysics: A Historical and Comparative Study.Catherine Wilson - 1990 - Princeton University Press.
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  45. Is the History of Philosophy Good for Philosophy?Catherine Wilson - 2005 - In Tom Sorell & G. A. J. Rogers (eds.), Analytic Philosophy and History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  46.  51
    What is the Importance of Descartes’s Meditation Six?Catherine Wilson - 2005 - Philosophica 76.
    In this essay, I argu e that Descartes considered his theory that the body is an inn ervated machine – in which the soul is situated – to be his most original contribution to philosophy. His ambition to prove the immortality of the soul was very poorly realized, a predictable outcome, insofar as his aims were ethical, not theological. His dualism accordingly requires reassessment.
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  47.  85
    The Role of a Merit Principle in Distributive Justice.Catherine Wilson - 2003 - The Journal of Ethics 7 (3):277-314.
    The claim that the level of well-beingeach enjoys ought to be to some extent afunction of individuals'' talents, efforts,accomplishments, and other meritoriousattributes faces serious challenge from bothegalitarians and libertarians, but also fromskeptics, who point to the poor historicalrecord of attempted merit assays and theubiquity of attribution biases arising fromlimited sweep, misattribution, custom andconvention, and mimicry. Yet merit-principlesare connected with reactive attitudes andinnate expectations, giving them some claim torecognition and there is a widespread beliefthat their use indirectly promotes thewell-being of all. (...)
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  48.  52
    Response to Ohad Nachtomy’s “Individuals, Worlds, and Relations: A Discussion of Catherine Wilson’s ‘Plenitude and Compossibility in Leibniz’”.Catherine Wilson - 2001 - The Leibniz Review 11:125-129.
    Ohad Nachtomy restates the main points of “Plenitude and Compossibility” with admirable fidelity and economy. His proposed revisions, based on the distinction between incomplete and complete substances and on the mind-relativity of relations, are intriguing additions to his earlier paper in Studia Leibnitiana and deserve careful consideration. Some brief remarks on the context of the problem, will, I hope, help to set the stage for the assessment of our various views.
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  49. Kant and the Speculative Sciences of Origins.Catherine Wilson - 2006 - In Justin E. H. Smith (ed.), The Problem of Animal Generation in Early Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
  50.  41
    Berkeley and the Microworld.Catherine Wilson - 1994 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 76 (1):37-64.
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