Results for 'Causation History'

998 found
Order:
  1. Counterfactuals and causation: history, problems, and prospects.John Collins, Ned Hall & L. A. Paul - 2004 - In John Collins, Ned Hall & Laurie Paul (eds.), Causation and Counterfactuals. MIT Press. pp. 1--57.
    Among the many philosophers who hold that causal facts1 are to be explained in terms of—or more ambitiously, shown to reduce to—facts about what happens, together with facts about the fundamental laws that govern what happens, the clear favorite is an approach that sees counterfactual dependence as the key to such explanation or reduction. The paradigm examples of causation, so advocates of this approach tell us, are examples in which events c and e— the cause and its effect— both (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   69 citations  
  2.  12
    Efficient Causation: A History.Tad M. Schmaltz (ed.) - 2014 - , US: Oup Usa.
    This volume is a collection of new essays by specialists that trace the concept of efficient causation from its discovery in Ancient Greece, through its development in late antiquity, the medieval period, and modern philosophy, to its use in contemporary metaphysics and philosophy of science.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3.  26
    Rewriting History: Backwards Causation and Conflicting Declarations Among Institutional Facts.Richard Corry - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-17.
    Kenneth Silver has recently argued that backwards causation is common in the context of social institutions. I consider this claim in detail and conclude that backwards causation is not the most plausible interpretation of what is going on in the cases Silver considers. Nonetheless, I show that these cases can teach us some interesting lessons about institutional facts. In particular, I argue that in order to avoid contradiction due to conflicting declarations in these cases, we must conclude that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  13
    Causation in science.Yemima Ben-Menahem - 2018 - Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.
    This book explores the role of causal constraints in science, shifting our attention from causal relations between individual events--the focus of most philosophical treatments of causation--to a broad family of concepts and principles generating constraints on possible change. Yemima Ben-Menahem looks at determinism, locality, stability, symmetry principles, conservation laws, and the principle of least action-causal constraints that serve to distinguish events and processes that our best scientific theories mandate or allow from those they rule out. Ben-Menahem's approach reveals that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  5.  29
    Causation in History: Mendel F. Cohen.Mendel F. Cohen - 1987 - Philosophy 62 (241):341-360.
    Following the practice of human beings everywhere historians distinguish the real or most significant cause of an occurrence or state of affairs from ‘less important considerations’, ‘precipitating circumstances’, or ‘mere conditions’. I shall term claims that some phenomenon is most basically to be attributed to some one of the factors causally necessary for its occurrence attributive causal explanations or causal attributions and discuss here the extent to which moral convictions are constitutive of them.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  37
    Efficient Causation: A History ed. by Tad M. Schmaltz.Andrea Falcon - 2015 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (3):541-542.
    This volume is a history of the concept of efficient causation in three parts. The natural starting point of this history is Aristotle, who claims to be the first to introduce the concept of the efficient cause. According to Aristotle, his predecessors had at most a confused and inadequate notion of this cause. By contrast, he has a theory of the four causes, and his treatment of the efficient cause is a part of that theory. Note, however, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  24
    Causation and its application to history.Morris Raphael Cohen - 1942 - [n. p.,: [N. P..
  8. Hobbesian causation and personal identity in the history of criminology.Luke William Hunt - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (2):247-266.
    Hobbes is known for bridging natural and political philosophy, but less attention has been given to how this distinguishes the Hobbesian conception of the self from individualist strands of liberalism. First, Hobbes’s determinism suggests a conception of the self in which externalities determine the will and what the self is at every moment. Second, there is no stable conception of the self because externalities keep it in a constant state of flux. The metaphysical underpinnings of his project downplay the notion (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  3
    Causation in history.Indu Banga (ed.) - 1992 - Delhi: Manohar Publications.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  54
    History, Causation, and the Many-Worlds Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics.Bruce S. Bennett & Moletlanyi Tshipa - forthcoming - Journal of the Philosophy of History:1-22.
    The Many-Worlds Interpretation is a theory in physics which proposes that, rather than quantum-level events being resolved randomly as according to the Copenhagen Interpretation, the universe constantly divides into different versions or worlds. All physically possible worlds occur, though some outcomes are more likely than others, and therefore all possible histories exist. This paper explores some implications of this for history, especially concerning causation. Unlike counterfactuals, which concern different starting conditions, MWI concerns different outcomes of the same starting (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. EFFICIENT CAUSATION – A HISTORY. Edited by Tad M. Schmaltz. Oxford Philosophical Concepts. Oxford New York: Oxford University Press. [REVIEW]Andreea Mihali - forthcoming - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly.
    A new series entitled Oxford Philosophical Concepts (OPC) made its debut in November 2014. As the series’ Editor Christia Mercer notes, this series is an attempt to respond to the call for and the tendency of many philosophers to invigorate the discipline. To that end each volume will rethink a central concept in the history of philosophy, e.g. efficient causation, health, evil, eternity, etc. “Each OPC volume is a history of its concept in that it tells a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  44
    Efficient Causation: A History. Edited by Tad M. Schmaltz.Andreea Mihali - 2016 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 90 (1):163-167.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  21
    Causation: An episode in the history of thought.Lawrence K. Frank - 1934 - Journal of Philosophy 31 (16):421-428.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  46
    Causation in History.Mendel F. Cohen - 1987 - Philosophy 62 (241):341 - 360.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  22
    Causation and its Application to History.Morris R. Cohen - 1942 - Journal of the History of Ideas 3 (1):12.
  16.  20
    Causation in History.Robert S. Cohen - 1970 - In Hermann Bondi, Wolfgang Yourgrau & Allen duPont Breck (eds.), Physics, Logic, and History. New York: Plenum Press. pp. 231--251.
  17. Occasionalism: causation among the Cartesians.Steven M. Nadler - 2011 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    These essays examine the philosophical, scientific, theological and religious themes and arguments of occasionalism, as well as its roots in medieval views on ...
  18. Causation and Modern Philosophy.Keith Allen & Tom Stoneham (eds.) - 2010 - New York: Routledge.
    This volume brings together a collection of new essays by leading scholars on the subject of causation in the early modern period, from Descartes to Lady Mary Shepherd. Aimed at researchers, graduate students and advanced undergraduates, the volume advances the understanding of early modern discussions of causation, and situates these discussions in the wider context of early modern philosophy and science. Specifically, the volume contains essays on key early modern thinkers, such as Descartes, Hobbes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Hume, Kant. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19. The secret connexion: causation, realism, and David Hume.Galen Strawson - 1989 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    It is widely supposed that David Hume invented and espoused the "regularity" theory of causation, holding that causal relations are nothing but a matter of one type of thing being regularly followed by another. It is also widely supposed that he was not only right about this, but that it was one of his greatest contributions to philosophy. Strawson here argues that the regularity theory of causation is indefensible, and that Hume never adopted it in any case. Strawson (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   118 citations  
  20.  28
    Aquinas on Efficient Causation and Causal Powers.Gloria Ruth Frost - 2022 - Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press.
    In this innovative book, Gloria Frost reconstructs and analyses Aquinas's theories on efficient causation and causal powers, focusing specifically on natural causal powers and efficient causation in nature. Frost presents each element of Aquinas's theories one by one, comparing them with other theories, as well as examining the philosophical and interpretive ambiguities in Aquinas's thought and proposing fresh solutions to conceptual difficulties. Her discussion includes explanations of Aquinas's technical scholastic terminology in jargon-free prose, as well as background on (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  21. Causation and laws of nature.Max Kistler - 2006 - London: Routledge. Edited by Michael Beaney.
    Causation is important. It is, as Hume said, the cement of the universe, and lies at the heart of our conceptual structure. Causation is one of the most fundamental tools we have for organizing our apprehension of the external world and ourselves. But philosophers' disagreement about the correct interpretation of causation is as limitless as their agreement about its importance. The history of attempts to elucidate the nature of this concept and to situate it with respect (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  22.  99
    Some aspects of causation in history.E. J. Tapp - 1952 - Journal of Philosophy 49 (3):67-79.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  23.  10
    Herder's Treatment of Causation and Continuity in History.F. M. Barnard - 1963 - Journal of the History of Ideas 24 (2):197.
  24. Causation.Douglas Kutach - 2014 - Malden, MA: Polity.
    In most academic and non-academic circles throughout history, the world and its operation have been viewed in terms of cause and effect. The principles of causation have been applied, fruitfully, across the sciences, law, medicine, and in everyday life, despite the lack of any agreed-upon framework for understanding what causation ultimately amounts to. In this engaging and accessible introduction to the topic, Douglas Kutach explains and analyses the most prominent theories and examples in the philosophy of (...). The book is organized so as to respect the various cross-cutting and interdisciplinary concerns about causation, such as the reducibility of causation, its application to scientific modeling, its connection to influence and laws of nature, and its role in causal explanation. Kutach begins by presenting the four recurring distinctions in the literature on causation, proceeding through an exploration of various accounts of causation including determination, difference making and probability-raising. He concludes by carefully considering their application to the mind-body problem. _Causation_ provides a straightforward and compact survey of contemporary approaches to causation and serves as a friendly and clear guide for anyone interested in exploring the complex jungle of ideas that surround this fundamental philosophical topic. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  25.  69
    Mental Causation: The Mind-Body Problem.Anthony Dardis - 2008 - Columbia University Press.
    Anthony Dardis shows how to unravel the knot. He traces its early appearance in the history of philosophical inquiry, specifically in the work of Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, and T. H. Huxley.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  26. Backwards Causation and the Chancy Past.John Cusbert - 2018 - Mind 127 (505):1-33.
    I argue that the past can be objectively chancy in cases of backwards causation, and defend a view of chance that allows for this. Using a case, I argue against the popular temporal view of chance, according to which chances are defined relative to times, and all chancy events must lie in the future. I then state and defend the causal view of chance, according to which chances are defined relative to causal histories, and all chancy events must lie (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  27. Interventionist Causation in Physical Science.Karen R. Zwier - 2014 - Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    The current consensus view of causation in physics, as commonly held by scientists and philosophers, has several serious problems. It fails to provide an epistemology for the causal knowledge that it claims physics to possess; it is inapplicable in a prominent area of physics (classical thermodynamics); and it is difficult to reconcile with our everyday use of causal concepts and claims. In this dissertation, I use historical examples and philosophical arguments to show that the interventionist account of causation (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. The Oxford Handbook of Causation.Helen Beebee, Christopher Hitchcock & Peter Menzies (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Causation is a central topic in many areas of philosophy. In metaphysics, philosophers want to know what causation is, and how it is related to laws of nature, probability, action, and freedom of the will. In epistemology, philosophers investigate how causal claims can be inferred from statistical data, and how causation is related to perception, knowledge and explanation. In the philosophy of mind, philosophers want to know whether and how the mind can be said to have causal (...)
  29. Causation and melanoma classification.Brendan Clarke - 2011 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (1):19-32.
    In this article, I begin by giving a brief history of melanoma causation. I then discuss the current manner in which malignant melanoma is classified. In general, these systems of classification do not take account of the manner of tumour causation. Instead, they are based on phenomenological features of the tumour, such as size, spread, and morphology. I go on to suggest that misclassification of melanoma is a major problem in clinical practice. I therefore outline an alternative (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  30.  57
    Causation in Psychology.John Campbell - 2020 - Harvard University Press.
    "A blab droid is a robot with a body shaped like a pizza box, a pair of treads, and a smiley face. Guided by an onboard video camera, it roams hotel lobbies and conference centers, asking questions in the voice of a seven-year-old. "Can you help me?" "What is the worst thing you've ever done?" "Who in the world do you love most?" People pour their hearts out in response. This droid prompts the question of what we can hope from (...)
  31. Mechanistic Causation: Difference-Making is Enough.Stathis Psillos & Stavros Ioannidis - 2019 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 3 (38):53-75.
    In this paper we defend the view that mechanisms are underpinned by networks of difference-making relations. First, we distinguish and criticise two different kinds of arguments in favour of an activity-based understanding of mechanism: Glennan’s metaphysics- first approach and Illari and Williamson’s science-first approach. Second, we present an alternative difference-making view of mechanism and illustrate it by looking at the history of the case of scurvy prevention. We use the case of scurvy to argue that evidence for a mechanism (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32. Probabilistic causation and the explanatory role of natural selection.Pablo Razeto-Barry & Ramiro Frick - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 42 (3):344-355.
    The explanatory role of natural selection is one of the long-term debates in evolutionary biology. Nevertheless, the consensus has been slippery because conceptual confusions and the absence of a unified, formal causal model that integrates different explanatory scopes of natural selection. In this study we attempt to examine two questions: (i) What can the theory of natural selection explain? and (ii) Is there a causal or explanatory model that integrates all natural selection explananda? For the first question, we argue that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  33.  89
    Causation in the sciences: An inferentialist account.Julian Reiss - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (4):769-777.
    I present an alternative account of causation in the biomedical and social sciences according to which the meaning of causal claims is given by their inferential relations to other claims. Specifically, I will argue that causal claims are inferentially related to certain evidential claims as well as claims about explanation, prediction, intervention and responsibility. I explain in some detail what it means for a claim to be inferentially related to another and finally derive some implication of the proposed account (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  34.  71
    Intrinsic Causation in Humean Supervenience.Daniel Kodaj - 2014 - Ratio 28 (2):135-152.
    The paper investigates whether causation is extrinsic in Humean Supervenience in the sense that "being caused by" is an intrinsic relation between token causes and effects. The underlying goal is to test whether causality is extrinsic for Humeans and intrinsic for anti-Humeans in this sense. I argue that causation is typically extrinsic in HS, but it is intrinsic to event pairs that collectively most of the universe's history.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. The properties of mental causation.David Robb - 1997 - Philosophical Quarterly 47 (187):178-94.
    Recent discussions of mental causation have focused on three principles: (1) Mental properties are (sometimes) causally relevant to physical effects; (2) mental properties are not physical properties; (3) every physical event has in its causal history only physical events and physical properties. Since these principles seem to be inconsistent, solutions have focused on rejecting one or more of them. But I argue that, in spite of appearances, (1)–(3) are not inconsistent. The reason is that 'properties' is used in (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   59 citations  
  36.  53
    Causation and Creation in Late Antiquity.Anna Marmodoro & Brian D. Prince (eds.) - 2015 - Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press.
    Written by a group of leading scholars, this unique collection of essays investigates the views of both pagan and Christian philosophers on causation and the creation of the cosmos. Structured in two parts, the volume first looks at divine agency and how late antique thinkers, including the Stoics, Plotinus, Porphyry, Simplicius, Philoponus and Gregory of Nyssa, tackled questions such as: is the cosmos eternal? Did it come from nothing or from something pre-existing? How was it caused to come into (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  5
    Causation in Historiography.Aviezer Tucker - 2008 - In A Companion to the Philosophy of History and Historiography. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 98–108.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Unificationist Accounts of Causation Conditional Theories Counterfactuals Causation as a Process Probability Exceptionalism Eliminativism Primitivism References.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  21
    Causation and gravitation in George Cheyne's Newtonian natural philosophy.Patrick J. Connolly - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 85 (C):145-154.
    This paper analyzes the metaphysical system developed in Cheyne’s Philosophical Principles of Religion. Cheyne was an early proponent of Newtonianism and tackled several philosophical questions raised by Newton’s work. The most pressing of these concerned the causal origin of gravitational attraction. Cheyne rejected the occasionalist explanations offered by several of his contemporaries in favor of a model on which God delegated special causal powers to bodies. Additionally, he developed an innovative approach to divine conservation. This allowed him to argue that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39. Inherence, Causation, and Conceivability in Spinoza.Yitzhak Y. Melamed - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    In this paper I suggest a new interpretation of the relations of inherence, causation and conception in Spinoza. I discuss the views of Don Garrett on this issue and argue against Della Rocca's recent suggestion that a strict endorsement of the PSR leads necessarily to the identification of the relations of inherence, causation and conception. I argue that Spinoza never endorsed this identity, and that Della Rocca's suggestion could not be considered as a legitimate reconstruction or friendly amendment (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40. Efficient Causation in Spinoza and Leibniz.Martin Lin - 2014 - In Tad Scmaltz (ed.), Efficient Causation: A History. pp. 165-191.
  41. Causation and models of disease in epidemiology.Alex Broadbent - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 40 (4):302-311.
    Nineteenth-century medical advances were entwined with a conceptual innovation: the idea that many cases of disease which were previously thought to have diverse causes could be explained by the action of a single kind of cause, for example a certain bacterial or parasitic infestation. The focus of modern epidemiology, however, is on chronic non-communicable diseases, which frequently do not seem to be attributable to any single causal factor. This paper is an effort to resolve the resulting tension. The paper criticises (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  42.  9
    Causation in historical events.Frederick John Teggart - 1942 - [n. p.,: [N. P..
  43. Divine Causation and Human Freedom in Aquinas.Brian J. Shanley - 1998 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 72 (1):99-122.
  44.  55
    Causation and Space-Time.Vincent Lam - 2005 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 27 (3/4):465 - 478.
    This paper considers the physical accounts of causation in terms of conserved quantities in the light of the theory of general relativity. As it is rather well-known among physicists, there are several difficulties with the notions of conservation and localization of the (gravitational) energy-momentum within general relativity. We first begin to review the so-called conserved quantity theory of causation mainly due to Dowe and Salmon, then we discuss some consequences of these difficulties for this physical account of (...). We argue that these difficulties are due to the fundamental nature of the space-time structure as described by GR, which the conserved quantity theory of causation does not account for. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  45.  15
    Causation: a Prematurely Deposed Monarch? [Huw Price and Richard Corry, eds., Causation, Physics, and the Constitution of Reality: Russell’s Republic Revisited ].Chad Trainer - 2008 - Russell: The Journal of Bertrand Russell Studies 28 (1):81-86.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:September 27, 2008 (1:09 pm) G:\WPData\TYPE2801\russell 28,1 048RED.wpd Reviews 81 CAUSATION: A PREMATURELY DEPOSED MONARCH? Chad Trainer 1006 Davids Run Phoenixville, pa 19460, usa stratof{[email protected] Huw Price and Richard Corry, eds. Causation, Physics, and the Constitution of Reality: Russell’s Republic Revisited. Oxford: Clarendon P.; New York: Oxford U. P., 2007. Pp. x, 403. isbn: 978-0-19-927819-0. £58 (hb); £19.99 (pb.). us$35 (pb). In 1911 the Aristotelian Society elected (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46.  38
    Causation, Extrinsic Relations, and Hume's Second Thoughts about Personal Identity.Louis E. Loeb - 1992 - Hume Studies 18 (2):219-231.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Causation, Extrinsic Relations, and Hume's Second Thoughts about Personal Identity Louis E. Loeb According to the account offered in Treatise 1.4.6, "Of personal identity," the identity of a mind over time consists in a sequence of perceptions related by causation. In both ofHume's two definitions of cause, causation is an external or extrinsic relation. Hume is explicit that this result is tolerable. If causation is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47.  23
    Probabilistic causation and the explanatory role of natural selection.Pablo Razeto-Barry & Ramiro Frick - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 42 (3):344-355.
  48.  9
    The Volitional Theory of Causation: From Berkeley to the Twentieth Century.W. J. Mander - 2023 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    This book presents a history of the volitional theory of causation—the philosophical proposal that volition, or will, of the same or broadly the same stamp as that which we experience in our own deliberate and voluntary doings, should be taken as the basis for all causality. Few today know much about the volitional theory of causation, and even fewer have given it any serious attention. But if current opinion regards this suggestion as an unusual one, of minor (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  78
    Indispensability, causation and explanation.Sorin Bangu - 2018 - Theoria : An International Journal for Theory, History and Fundations of Science 33 (2):219-232.
    When considering mathematical realism, some scientific realists reject it, and express sympathy for the opposite view, mathematical nominalism; moreover, many justify this option by invoking the causal inertness of mathematical objects. The main aim of this note is to show that the scientific realists’ endorsement of this causal mathematical nominalism is in tension with another position some of them also accept, the doctrine of methodological naturalism. By highlighting this conflict, I intend to tip the balance in favor of a rival (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Panpsychism and Causation: A New Argument and a Solution to the Combination Problem.Hedda Hassel Mørch - 2014 - Dissertation, Oslo
    Panpsychism is the view that every concrete and unified thing has some form of phenomenal consciousness or experience. It is an age-old doctrine, which, to the surprise of many, has recently taken on new life. In philosophy of mind, it has been put forth as a simple and radical solution to the mind–body problem (Chalmers 1996, 2003;Strawson 2006; Nagel 1979, 2012). In metaphysics and philosophy of science, it has been put forth as a solution to the problem of accounting for (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
1 — 50 / 998