Search results for 'Cecelia Lynch' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  31
    Cecelia Lynch (1994). Kant, the Republican Peace, and Moral Guidance in International Law. Ethics and International Affairs 8 (1):39–58.
    Lynch addresses the return to Immanuel Kant—a "prophet of progressive international reform"—and examines the relationship between the Kantian system of ethics and the development of international law in the post-Cold War era.
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  2.  11
    Cecelia Lynch (2000). Acting on Belief: Christian Perspectives on Suffering and Violence. Ethics and International Affairs 14 (1):83–97.
    Two types of Judeo-Christian perspective stress the imperative to act to relieve suffering and transcend violence: liberation theology and the "religious humanitarian perspective." Both link ethics and action; both influence political debate.
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  3.  19
    Kevin G. Lynch, Tridib Banerjee & Michael Southworth (1990). City Sense and City Design Writings and Projects of Kevin Lynch.
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  4.  33
    Filippo Ferrari, Michael P. Lynch & Douglas Edwards (2015). Truth and Naturalism. In Kelly J. Clark (ed.), Blackwell Companion to Naturalism. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Is truth itself natural? This is an important question for both those working on truth and those working on naturalism. For theorists of truth, answering the question of whether truth is natural will tell us more about the nature of truth (or lack of it), and the relations between truth and other properties of interest. For those working on naturalism, answering this question is of paramount importance to those who wish to have truth as part of the natural order. In (...)
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  5. Michael P. Lynch (2009). Truth as One and Many. Clarendon Press.
    What is truth? Michael Lynch defends a bold new answer to this question. Traditional theories of truth hold that truth has only a single uniform nature. All truths are true in the same way. More recent deflationary theories claim that truth has no nature at all; the concept of truth is of no real philosophical importance. In this concise and clearly written book, Lynch argues that we should reject both these extremes and hold that truth is a functional (...)
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  6.  10
    Michael P. Lynch (1998). Truth in Context: An Essay on Pluralism and Objectivity.
    A Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 1999 Academic debates about pluralism and truth have become increasingly polarized in recent years. One side embraces extreme relativism, deeming any talk of objective truth as philosophically naïve. The opposition, frequently arguing that any sort of relativism leads to nihilism, insists on an objective notion of truth according to which there is only one true story of the world. Both sides agree that there is no middle path. In Truth in Context, Michael Lynch (...)
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  7.  27
    William T. Lynch (2005). The Ghost of Wittgenstein: Forms of Life, Scientific Method, and Cultural Critique. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (2):139-174.
    In developing an "internal" sociology of science, the sociology of scientific knowledge drew on Wittgenstein’s later philosophy to reinterpret traditional epistemological topics in sociological terms. By construing scientific reasoning as rule following within a collective, sociologists David Bloor and Harry Collins effectively blocked outside criticism of a scientific field, whether scientific, philosophical, or political. Ethnomethodologist Michael Lynch developed an alternative, Wittgensteinian reading that similarly blocked philosophical or political critique, while also disallowing analytical appeals to historical or institutional contexts. I (...)
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  8.  3
    Lisa Lynch (2002). The Epidemiology of “Regrettable Kinship”: Gender, Epidemic, and Community in Todd Haynes' [Safe] and Richard Powers' Gain. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 23 (3-4):203-219.
    In “The Epidemiology of ‘Regrettable Kinship’: Gender, Epidemic, and Community in Todd Haynes' [Safe] and Richard Powers' Gain,” the author analyzes two contemporary cultural texts about women and environmentally-linked illnesses to rethink commonplace understandings of the relationship between gender, disease, and community formation. By reading these narratives side by side, Lynch is able to address difficult issues about gendered subjectivity and the fragile construction of collective political identity. While the female protagonists in the texts Lynch examines relate differently (...)
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  9.  3
    Michael P. Lynch (2014). In Praise of Reason: Why Rationality Matters for Democracy. MIT Press.
    Why does reason matter, if in the end everything comes down to blind faith or gut instinct? Why not just go with what you believe even if it contradicts the evidence? Why bother with rational explanation when name-calling, manipulation, and force are so much more effective in our current cultural and political landscape? Michael Lynch's In Praise of Reason offers a spirited defense of reason and rationality in an era of widespread skepticism--when, for example, people reject scientific evidence about (...)
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  10.  43
    Michael Lynch (1993). Scientific Practice and Ordinary Action: Ethnomethodology and Social Studies of Science. Cambridge University Press.
    Philosophers, historians, and sociologists of science have grown interested in the daily practices of scientists. Recent studies have drawn linkages between scientific innovations and more ordinary procedures, craft skills, and sources of sponsorship. These studies dispute the idea that science is the application of a unified method or the outgrowth of a progressive history of ideas. This book critically reviews arguments and empirical studies in two areas of sociology that have played a significant role in the 'sociological turn' in science (...)
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  11.  15
    Michael P. Lynch (2004). True to Life: Why Truth Matters. Cambridge: MIT Press.
  12.  4
    James C. Lynch (1980). The Functional Organization of Posterior Parietal Association Cortex. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (4):485.
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  13.  46
    Michael Lynch (forthcoming). Understanding and Coming to Understand. In Stephen Grimm (ed.), Making Sense of the World: New Essays on the Philosophy of Understanding. Oxford University Press.
    Many philosophers take understanding to be a distinctive kind of knowledge that involves grasping dependency relations; moreover, they hold it to be particularly valuable. This paper aims to investigate and address two well-known puzzles that arise from this conception: (1) the nature of understanding itself—in particular, the nature of “grasping”; (2) the source of understanding’s distinctive value. In what follows, I’ll argue that we can shed light on both puzzles by recognizing first, the importance of the distinction between the act (...)
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  14. Michael Lynch (2009). The Truth of Values and the Values of Truth'. In Pritchard, Haddock & MIllar (eds.), Epistemic Value. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
     
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  15. Michael P. Lynch (2006). Rewrighting Pluralism. The Monist 89 (1):63-84.
  16.  45
    Michael P. Lynch (ed.) (2001). The Nature of Truth: Classic and Contemporary Perspectives. MIT Press.
    These essays center around two questions: Does truth have an underlying nature? And if so, what sort of nature does it have?
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  17. Kevin Lynch (2016). Willful Ignorance and Self-Deception. Philosophical Studies 173 (2):505-523.
    Willful ignorance is an important concept in criminal law and jurisprudence, though it has not received much discussion in philosophy. When it is mentioned, however, it is regularly assumed to be a kind of self-deception. In this article I will argue that self-deception and willful ignorance are distinct psychological kinds. First, some examples of willful ignorance are presented and discussed, and an analysis of the phenomenon is developed. Then it is shown that current theories of self-deception give no support to (...)
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  18.  15
    K. Lynch (2014). New Managerialism, Neoliberalism and Ranking. Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 13 (2):141-153.
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  19.  97
    Michael P. Lynch (2004). Truth and Multiple Realizability. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (3):384 – 408.
    Pluralism about truth is the view that there is more than one way for a proposition to be true. When taken to imply that there is more than one concept and property of truth, this position faces a number of troubling objections. I argue that we can overcome these objections, and yet retain pluralism's key insight, by taking truth to be a multiply realizable property of propositions.
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  20. Jack Lynch (2000). Betwixt Two Ages Cast: Milton, Johnson, and the English Renaissance. Journal of the History of Ideas 61 (3):397-413.
  21. Edward Hackett, Olga Amsterdamska, Michael Lynch & Judy Wajcman (eds.) (2007). The Handbook of Science and Technology Studies. MIT Press.
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  22. Michael P. Lynch (2009). Truth, Value and Epistemic Expressivism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (1):76-97.
  23. Kevin Lynch (1962). The Image of the City. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 21 (1):91-91.
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  24. Kevin Lynch (2012). On the “Tension” Inherent in Self-Deception. Philosophical Psychology 25 (3):433-450.
    Alfred Mele's deflationary account of self-deception has frequently been criticised for being unable to explain the ?tension? inherent in self-deception. These critics maintain that rival theories can better account for this tension, such as theories which suppose self-deceivers to have contradictory beliefs. However, there are two ways in which the tension idea has been understood. In this article, it is argued that on one such understanding, Mele's deflationism can account for this tension better than its rivals, but only if we (...)
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  25. Ronald N. Giere, Michael Lynch & Steve Woolgar (1994). Representation in Scientific Practice. Biology and Philosophy 9 (1):113-120.
     
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  26. James A. Secord & John M. Lynch (2001). Victorian Sensation: The Extraordinary Publication, Reception, and Secret Authorship of "Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation". Journal of the History of Biology 34 (3):565-579.
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  27.  29
    Kevin Lynch (2016). The Myth of the Intuitive: Experimental Philosophy and Philosophical Method, by Max Deutsch (MIT Press, 2015). [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 29 (7):1088-1091.
  28. Elizabeth Kurtz Lynch (2003). John Wesley's Editorial Hand in Susanna Annesley Wesley's 1732 'Education'letter. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 85 (2):195-208.
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  29.  5
    M. Lynch (2000). Against Reflexivity as an Academic Virtue and Source of Privileged Knowledge. Theory, Culture and Society 17 (3):26-54.
    Reflexivity is a well-established theoretical and methodological concept in the human sciences, and yet it is used in a confusing variety of ways. The meaning of `reflexivity' and the virtues ascribed to the concept are relative to particular theoretical and methodological commitments. This article examines several versions of the concept, and critically focuses on treatments of reflexivity as a mark of distinction or source of methodological advantage. Although reflexivity often is associated with radical epistemologies, social scientists with more conventional leanings (...)
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  30. Kevin Lynch (2013). Self-Deception and Stubborn Belief. Erkenntnis 78 (6):1337-1345.
    Stubborn belief, like self-deception, is a species of motivated irrationality. The nature of stubborn belief, however, has not been investigated by philosophers, and it is something that poses a challenge to some prominent accounts of self-deception. In this paper, I argue that the case of stubborn belief constitutes a counterexample to Alfred Mele’s proposed set of sufficient conditions for self-deception, and I attempt to distinguish between the two. The recognition of this phenomenon should force an amendment in this account, and (...)
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  31.  36
    Michael P. Lynch (2012). In Praise of Reason. MIT Press.
    Can we give objective reasons for our most basic standards of reason-- our fundamental epistemic principles? I argue, against several forms of skepticism about reason, that we can, but that the reasons we can give for epistemic principles are ultimately practical, not epistemic.
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  32.  1
    William T. Lynch (2016). Social Epistemology Transformed: Steve Fuller’s Account of Knowledge as a Divine Spark for Human Domination. Symposion. Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 3 (2): 191-205.
    In his new book, Knowledge: The Philosophical Quest in History, Steve Fuller returns to core themes of his program of social epistemology that he first outlined in his 1988 book, Social Epistemology. He develops a new, unorthodox theology and philosophy building upon his testimony in Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District in defense of intelligent design, leading to a call for maximal human experimentation. Beginning from the theological premise rooted in the Abrahamic religious tradition that we are created in the (...)
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  33. Kevin Lynch (2014). Self-Deception and Shifts of Attention. Philosophical Explorations 17 (1):63-75.
    A prevalent assumption among philosophers who believe that people can intentionally deceive themselves (intentionalists) is that they accomplish this by controlling what evidence they attend to. This article is concerned primarily with the evaluation of this claim, which we may call ‘attentionalism’. According to attentionalism, when one justifiably believes/suspects that not-p but wishes to make oneself believe that p, one may do this by shifting attention away from the considerations supportive of the belief that not-p and onto considerations supportive of (...)
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  34.  98
    Richard A. Lynch (2008). The Alienating Mirror: Toward a Hegelian Critique of Lacan on Ego-Formation. Human Studies 31 (2):209-221.
    This article brings out certain philosophical difficulties in Lacan’s account of the mirror stage, the initial moment of the subject’s development. For Lacan, the “original organization of the forms of the ego” is “precipitated” in an infant’s self-recognition in a mirror image; this event is explicitly prior to any social interactions. A Hegelian objection to the Lacanian account argues that social interaction and recognition of others by infants are necessary prerequisites for infants’ capacity to recognize themselves in a mirror image. (...)
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  35. Michael P. Lynch (forthcoming). Epistemic Circularity and Epistemic Incommensurability. Social Epistemology:262--77.
  36.  58
    Michael Lynch (1988). The Externalized Retina: Selection and Mathematization in the Visual Documentation of Objects in the Life Sciences. [REVIEW] Human Studies 11 (2-3):201 - 234.
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  37.  20
    Michael P. Lynch (2013). Three Questions for Truth Pluralism. In Nikolaj Jang Lee Linding Pedersen & Cory Wright (eds.), Truth and Pluralism: Current Debates. Oxford University Press. pp. 21.
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  38.  11
    Michael P. Lynch (2004). Minimalism and the Value of Truth. Philosophical Quarterly 54 (217):497 - 517.
    Minimalists generally see themselves as engaged in a descriptive project. They maintain that they can explain everything we want to say about truth without appealing to anything other than the T-schema, i.e., the idea that the proposition that p is true iff p. I argue that despite recent claims to the contrary, minimalists cannot explain one important belief many people have about truth, namely, that truth is good. If that is so, then minimalism, and possibly deflationism as a whole, must (...)
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  39.  96
    Michael Lynch (2013). Epistemic Commitments, Epistemic Agency and Practical Reasons. Philosophical Issues 23 (1):343-362.
    In this paper, I raise two questions about epistemic commitments, and thus, indirectly, about our epistemic agency. Can we rationally defend such commitments when challenged to do so? And if so, how?
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  40. Michael P. Lynch (2010). Epistemic Circularity and Epistemic Disagreement. In Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.), Social Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
     
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  41.  95
    Kevin Lynch (2010). Self-Deception, Religious Belief, and the False Belief Condition. Heythrop Journal 51 (6):1073-1074.
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  42. M. Lynch (forthcoming). The Production of Scientific Images. Vision and Re-Vision, Philiosophy and Sociology of Science. Communication and Cognition: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly Journal.
     
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  43.  45
    Kevin Lynch (2016). Self‐Knowledge for Humans, by Quassim Cassam (Oxford University Press, 2014). [REVIEW] Dialectica 70 (1):113-119.
  44.  5
    John A. Lynch (2011). “Through a Glass Darkly”: Researcher Ethnocentrism and the Demonization of Research Participants. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (4):22-23.
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  45.  17
    K. Lynch & M. Ivancheva (2015). Academic Freedom and the Commercialisation of Universities: A Critical Ethical Analysis. Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 15 (1):1-15.
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  46. James C. Lynch (1978). The Command Function Concept in Studies of the Primate Nervous System. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):31.
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  47.  72
    Kevin Lynch (2015). Irrationality, by Lisa Bortolotti (Polity Press, 2014). [REVIEW] International Journal of Philosophical Studies 23 (4):605-609.
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  48.  68
    Kevin Lynch (2015). Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior, by Leonard Mlodinow (Vintage Books, 2013). [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 22 (9-10):229-234.
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  49.  57
    Michael P. Lynch (2005). Alethic Functionalism and Our Folk Theory of Truth: A Reply to Cory Wright. Synthese 145 (1):29-43.
    According to alethic functionalism, truth is a higher-order multiply realizable property of propositions. After briefly presenting the views main principles and motivations, I defend alethic functionalism from recent criticisms raised against it by Cory Wright. Wright argues that alethic functionalism will collapse either into deflationism or into a view that takes true as simply ambiguous. I reject both claims.
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  50.  77
    Kevin Lynch (2014). The Vagaries of Psychoanalytic Interpretation: An Investigation Into the Causes of the Consensus Problem in Psychoanalysis. Philosophia 42 (3):779-799.
    Though the psychoanalytic method of interpretation is seen by psychoanalysts as a reliable scientific tool for investigating the unconscious mind, its reputation has long been marred by what’s known as the consensus problem: where different analysts fail to reach agreement when they interpret the same phenomena. This has long been thought, by both practitioners and observers of psychoanalysis, to undermine its claim to scientific status. The causes of this problem, however, are dimly understood. In this paper I attempt to illuminate (...)
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