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Cecile Fabre
Oxford University
  1.  65
    Cosmopolitan War.Cécile Fabre - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
  2. An Ethical Framework for Global Vaccine Allocation.Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Govind Persad, Adam Kern, Allen E. Buchanan, Cecile Fabre, Daniel Halliday, Joseph Heath, Lisa M. Herzog, R. J. Leland, Ephrem T. Lemango, Florencia Luna, Matthew McCoy, Ole F. Norheim, Trygve Ottersen, G. Owen Schaefer, Kok-Chor Tan, Christopher Heath Wellman, Jonathan Wolff & Henry S. Richardson - 2020 - Science 1:DOI: 10.1126/science.abe2803.
    In this article, we propose the Fair Priority Model for COVID-19 vaccine distribution, and emphasize three fundamental values we believe should be considered when distributing a COVID-19 vaccine among countries: Benefiting people and limiting harm, prioritizing the disadvantaged, and equal moral concern for all individuals. The Priority Model addresses these values by focusing on mitigating three types of harms caused by COVID-19: death and permanent organ damage, indirect health consequences, such as health care system strain and stress, as well as (...)
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  3.  74
    Whose Body is It Anyway? Justice and the Integrity of the Person.Cécile Fabre - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Do we have the right to deny others access to our body? What if this would harm those who need personal services or body parts from us? Ccile Fabre examines the impact that arguments for distributive justice have on the rights we have over ourselves, and on such contentious issues as organ sales, prostitution, and surrogate motherhood.
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  4.  96
    Guns, Food, and Liability to Attack in War.Cécile Fabre - 2009 - Ethics 120 (1):36-63.
  5.  2
    Cosmopolitan Peace.Cécile Fabre - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This book articulates a cosmopolitan theory of the principles which ought to regulate belligerents' conduct in the aftermath of war. Throughout, it relies on the fundamental principle that all human beings, wherever they reside, have rights to the freedoms and resources which they need to lead a flourishing life, and that national and political borders are largely irrelevant to the conferral of those rights. With that principle in hand, the book provides a normative defence of restitutive and reparative justice, the (...)
  6.  47
    The Morality of Defensive War.Cécile Fabre & Seth Lazar (eds.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    International law and conventional morality grant that states may stand ready to defend their borders with lethal force. But what grounds the permission to kill for the sake of political sovereignty and territorial integrity? In this book leading theorists address this vexed issue, and set the terms of future debate over national defence.
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  7.  22
    Social Rights Under the Constitution: Government and the Decent Life.Cécile Fabre - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    The book theoretically examines the recent and topical debates over democracy and social rights, arguing that there are four fundamental rights that should be constitutionalized; minimum income; housing; healthcare; and education. The theoretical discussion is explored within an analysis of important legal cases.
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  8.  14
    On the Ethics of Vaccine Nationalism: The Case for the Fair Priority for Residents Framework.Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Allen Buchanan, Shuk Ying Chan, Cécile Fabre, Daniel Halliday, R. J. Leland, Florencia Luna, Matthew S. McCoy, Ole F. Norheim, G. Owen Schaefer, Kok-Chor Tan & Christopher Heath Wellman - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (4):543-562.
    COVID-19 vaccines are likely to be scarce for years to come. Many countries, from India to the U.K., have demonstrated vaccine nationalism. What are the ethical limits to this vaccine nationalism? Neither extreme nationalism nor extreme cosmopolitanism is ethically justifiable. Instead, we propose the fair priority for residents framework, in which governments can retain COVID-19 vaccine doses for their residents only to the extent that they are needed to maintain a noncrisis level of mortality while they are implementing reasonable public (...)
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  9.  67
    Mandatory Rescue Killings.Cécile Fabre - 2007 - Journal of Political Philosophy 15 (4):363–384.
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  10. What Are the Obligations of Pharmaceutical Companies in a Global Health Emergency?Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Allen Buchanan, Shuk Ying Chan, Cécile Fabre, Daniel Halliday, Joseph Heath, Lisa Herzog, R. J. Leland, Matthew S. McCoy, Ole F. Norheim, Carla Saenz, G. Owen Schaefer, Kok-Chor Tan, Christopher Heath Wellman, Jonathan Wolff & Govind Persad - 2021 - Lancet 398 (10304):1015.
    All parties involved in researching, developing, manufacturing, and distributing COVID-19 vaccines need guidance on their ethical obligations. We focus on pharmaceutical companies' obligations because their capacities to research, develop, manufacture, and distribute vaccines make them uniquely placed for stemming the pandemic. We argue that an ethical approach to COVID-19 vaccine production and distribution should satisfy four uncontroversial principles: optimising vaccine production, including development, testing, and manufacturing; fair distribution; sustainability; and accountability. All parties' obligations should be coordinated and mutually consistent. For (...)
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  11.  3
    War, Duties to Protect, and Military Abolitionism.Cécile Fabre - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (3):395-406.
    Just war theorists who argue that war is morally justified under certain circumstances infer implicitly that establishing the military institutions needed to wage war is also morally justified. In this paper, I mount a case in favor of a standing military establishment: to the extent that going to war is a way to discharge duties to protect fellow citizens and distant strangers from grievous harms, we have a duty to set up the institutions that enable us to discharge that duty. (...)
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  12.  49
    Justice in a Changing World.Cecile Fabre - 2007 - Polity.
    Should governments give special rights to ethnic and cultural minorities? Should rich countries open their borders to economic immigrants or transfer resources to poor countries? When framing and implementing economic and environmental policies, should current generations take into account the interests of future generations? If our political community committed a wrong against another group a hundred years ago, do we owe reparations to current members of that group? These are just some of the pressing questions which are fully explored in (...)
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  13.  3
    The Law Vs. The Sword: Arthur Ripstein’s Account of the Morality and Law of War.Cécile Fabre - 2021 - Criminal Justice Ethics 40 (3):256-268.
    Suppose that state A wages war against state D. We want to know at least three things. First, does state A have a moral and legal justification for going to war? Second, what may and must those sta...
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  14.  26
    Peace, Self‐Determination and Reckoning with the Past: A Reply to Butt, Lippert‐Rasmussen, Pasternak, Wellman and Stemplowska.Cécile Fabre - 2019 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 36 (3):391-404.
  15.  62
    Permissible Rescue Killings.Cécile Fabre - 2009 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 109 (1pt2):149-164.
    Many believe that agent-centred considerations, unlike agent-neutral reasons, cannot show that victims have the right to kill their attackers in self-defence, let alone establish that rescuers have the right to come to their help. In this paper, I argue that the right to kill in self- or other-defence is best supported by a hybrid set of reasons. In particular, agent-centred considerations account for the plausible intuition that victims have a special stake, which other parties lack, in being to thwart the (...)
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  16.  24
    War Exit.Cécile Fabre - 2015 - Ethics 125 (3):631-652.
    This article argues that we must sever the ethics of war termination from the ethics of war initiation: a belligerent who embarks on a just war at time t1 might be under a duty to sue for peace at t2 before it has achieved its just war aims; conversely, a belligerent who embarks on an unjust war at t1 might acquire a justification for continuing at t2. In the course of making that argument, the article evaluates the various ways in (...)
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  17. VIII-Permissible Rescue Killings.Cécile Fabre - 2009 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 109 (1pt2):149-164.
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  18. Distributive Justice and Freedom: Cohen on Money and Labour*: Cécile Fabre.Cécile Fabre - 2010 - Utilitas 22 (4):393-412.
    In his recent Rescuing Justice and Equality, G. A. Cohen mounts a sustained critique of coerced labour, against the background of a radical egalitarian conception of distributive justice. In this article, I argue that Cohenian egalitarians are committed to holding the talented under a moral duty to choose socially useful work for the sake of the less fortunate. As I also show, Cohen's arguments against coerced labour fail, particularly in the light of his commitment to coercive taxation. In the course (...)
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  19.  17
    The Morality of Treason.Cécile Fabre - 2020 - Law and Philosophy 39 (4):427-461.
    Treason is one of the most serious legal offences that there are, in most if not all jurisdictions. Laws against treason are rooted in deep-seated moral revulsion about acts which, in the political realm, are paradigmatic examples of breaches of loyalty. Yet, it is not altogether clear what treason consists in: someone’s traitor is often another’s loyalist. In this paper, my aim is twofold: to offer a plausible conceptual account of treason, and to partly rehabilitate traitors. I focus on informational (...)
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  20.  30
    Rights, Justice and War: A Reply.Cécile Fabre - 2014 - Law and Philosophy 33 (3):391-425.
    I offer a response to Rodin’s, Statman’s, Stilz’s, and Tadros’ papers on my book Cosmopolitan War.
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  21.  8
    Mandatory Rescue Killings &Ast.Cécile Fabre - 2007 - Journal of Political Philosophy 15 (4):363-384.
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  22.  70
    Global Distributive Justice: An Egalitarian Perspective.Cécile Fabre - 2005 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 31 (sup1):139-164.
    A good deal of political theory over the last fifteen years or so has been shaped by the realization that one cannot, and ought not, consider the distribution of resources within a country in isolation from the distribution of resources between countries. Thus, thinkers such as Charles Beitz and Thomas Pogge advocate extensive global distributive policies; others, such as Charles Jones and David Miller, explicitly reject the view that egalitarian principles of justice should apply globally and claim that national communities (...)
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  23.  4
    Economic Statecraft - Human Rights, Sanctions and Conditionality.Cecile Fabre - 2018 - Cambridge, MA, USA: Harvard University Press.
    At least since Athenian trade sanctions helped to spark the Peloponnesian War, economic coercion has been a prominent tool of foreign policy. In the modern era, sovereign states and multilateral institutions have imposed economic sanctions on dictatorial regimes or would-be nuclear powers as an alternative to waging war. They have conditioned offers of aid, loans, and debt relief on recipients’ willingness to implement market and governance reforms. Such methods interfere in freedom of trade and the internal affairs of sovereign states, (...)
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  24.  33
    III—Doxastic Wrongs, Non-Spurious Generalizations and Particularized Beliefs.Cécile Fabre - 2022 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 122 (1):47-69.
    According to the doxastic wrongs thesis, holding certain beliefs about others can be morally wrongful. Beliefs which take the form of stereotypes based on race and gender and which turn out to be false and are negatively valenced are prime candidates for the charge of doxastic wronging: it is no coincidence that most of the cases discussed in the literature involve false beliefs. My aim in this paper is to show that the thesis of doxastic wrongs does not turn on (...)
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  25.  53
    Obligations in a Global Health Emergency - Authors’ Reply.Ezekiel Emanuel, Cecile Fabre, Lisa M. Herzog, Ole F. Norheim, Govind Persad, G. Owen Schaefer & Kok-Chor Tan - 2021 - Lancet 398 (10316):2072.
  26. Internecine War Killings.Cécile Fabre - 2012 - Utilitas 24 (2):214-236.
    In his recent book Killing in War, McMahan develops a powerful argument for the view that soldiers on opposite sides of a conflict are not morally on a par once the war has started: whether they have the right to kill depends on the justness of their war. In line with just war theory in general, McMahan scrutinizes the ethics of killing the enemy. In this article, I accept McMahan's account, but bring it to bear on the entirely neglected, but (...)
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  27.  14
    In Defense of Mercenarism.Cecile Fabre - 2010 - British Journal of Political Science 40 (2010):539-559.
    The recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have been characterized by the deployment of large private military forces, under contract with the US administration. The use of so-called private military corporations and, more generally, of mercenaries, has long attracted criticisms. This article argues that under certain conditions, there is nothing inherently objectionable about mercenarism. It begins by exposing a weakness in the most obvious justification for mercenarism, to wit, the justification from freedom of occupational choice. It then deploys a less (...)
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  28.  40
    Justice, Fairness, and World Ownership.Cécile Fabre - 2002 - Law and Philosophy 21 (3):249-273.
    It is a central tenet of most contemporary theories of justice that the badly-off have a right to some of the resources of the well-off. In this paper, I take as my starting point two principles of justice, to wit, the principle of sufficiency, whereby individuals have a right to the material resources they need in order to lead a decent life, and the principle of autonomy, whereby once everybody has such a life, individuals should be allowed to pursue their (...)
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  29.  57
    Good Samaritanism : A Matter of Justice.Cécile Fabre - 2002 - In Jonathan Seglow (ed.), Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy. F. Cass Publishers. pp. 128-144.
    Liberal theorists of justice hardly ever study duties of Good Samaritanism. This is not to say that they regard a failure to be a Good Samaritan as morally acceptable: indeed, most of them think that it is morally wrong. But they tend not to think that it is morally wrong on the grounds that it constitutes a violation of a duty of justice. Rather, they condemn it as a failure to perform a duty of charity, or as a failure to (...)
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  30.  34
    Preparing for Politics: Judith Butler's Ethical Dispositions.Cécile Fabre - 2010 - Contemporary Political Theory 9 (3):284-303.
    The question of Judith Butler's ‘politics’ and their normative justification has been raised by critics and supporters alike for some time. The number of recent texts dedicated to this topic suggests that it remains an unresolved and still pressing question. I argue that in order to identify and evaluate the political implications of Butler's work, we must first recognize the relationship and distinction between four vectors of her thinking: her diagnosis of the human condition, her expression of specific normative aspirations, (...)
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  31. 10. Neil MacCormick, Practical Reason in Law and Morality Neil MacCormick, Practical Reason in Law and Morality (Pp. 192-196).Henry S. Richardson, Cécile Fabre, Joshua Glasgow, Alison Hills, Kieran Setiya & Hallie Rose Liberto - 2009 - In John Hawthorne (ed.), Ethics. Wiley Periodicals.
  32.  10
    Good Samaritanism: A Matter of Justice.Cécile Fabre - 2002 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 5 (4):128-144.
  33. Posthumous Rights.Cecile Fabre - 2008 - In Matthew H. Kramer (ed.), The Legacy of H.L.A. Hart: Legal, Political, and Moral Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
  34. Preconception Rights.Cécile Fabre - 2009 - In Stephen De Wijze, Matthew H. Kramer & Ian Carter (eds.), Hillel Steiner and the Anatomy of Justice: Themes and Challenges. Routledge. pp. 16--53.
  35.  8
    Justice, Fairness, and World Ownership.Cécile Fabre - 2002 - Law and Philosophy 21 (3):249-273.
    It is a central tenet of most contemporary theories of justice that the badly-off have a right to some of the resources of the well-off. In this paper, I take as my starting point two principles of justice, to wit, the principle of sufficiency, whereby individuals have a right to the material resources they need in order to lead a decent life, and the principle of autonomy, whereby once everybody has such a life, individuals should be allowed to pursue their (...)
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  36. Justice and the Compulsory Taking of Live Body Parts.Cécile Fabre - 2003 - Utilitas 15 (2):127.
    This paper argues that, if one thinks that the needy have a right to the material resources they need in order to lead decent lives, one must be committed, in some cases, to conferring on the sick a right that the healthy give them some of the body parts they need to lead such a life. I then assess two objections against that view, to wit: to confer on the sick a right to the live body parts of the healthy (...)
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  37.  27
    Territorial Sovereignty and Humankind's Common Heritage☆.Cécile Fabre - 2021 - Journal of Social Philosophy 52 (1):17-23.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  38. To Deliberate or to Discourse.Cécile Fabre - 2003 - European Journal of Political Theory 2 (1):107-115.
  39. Against Body Exceptionalism: A Reply to Eyal.Cécile Fabre - 2009 - Utilitas 21 (2):246-248.
    It is hard to do justice, in a short reply, to Eyal's excellent review. Accordingly, I will focus on what I take to be its central claim – namely that I fail to give proper consideration to the extent to which the forced extraction of body parts undermines individuals' opportunities for self-respect. According to Eyal, ‘body exceptionalism’ can be defended on the following grounds: ‘People usually see trespass into a person and into objects they associate with a person – especially (...)
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  40.  12
    Harming, Rescuing and the Necessity Constraint on Defensive Force.Cécile Fabre - 2022 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 16 (3):525-538.
    In _The Morality of Defensive Force_, Quong defends a powerful account of the grounds and conditions under which an agent may justifiably inflict serious harm on another person. In this paper, I examine Quong's account of the necessity constraint on permissible harming—the RESCUE account. I argue that RESCUE does not succeed. Section 2 describes RESCUE. Section 3 raises some worries about Quong's conceptual construal of the right to be rescued and its attendant duties. Section 4 argues that RESCUE does not (...)
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  41.  2
    Introduction to the Symposium on War By Agreement by Yitzhak Benbaji and Daniel Statman.Janina Dill & Cécile Fabre - 2022 - Law and Philosophy 41 (6):663-669.
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  42.  6
    Justice and Doxastic Handicaps.Cécile Fabre - 2021 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 38 (5):753-759.
  43.  44
    Is the Body Special? Review of Cecile Fabre, Whose Body is It Anyway? Justice and the Integrity of the Person.Cécile Fabre - 2009 - Utilitas 21 (2).
  44. Rights and Non-Existence.Cécile Fabre - 2008 - In Matthew Kramer, Claire Grant, Ben Colburn & Antony Hatzistavrou (eds.), The Legacy of H.L.A. Hart: Legal, Political and Moral Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
  45. Ian Carter is Associate Professor of Political Philosophy at the Univer-Sity of Pavia, Italy. His Principal Books Include A Measure of Freedom (1999) and La Liberta Eguale (2005). He and Hillel Steiner and Mat-Thew Kramer Have Recently Edited Freedom: A Philosophical Anthology (2007). [REVIEW]G. A. Cohen, Cecile Fabre & Norman Geras - 2009 - In Stephen De Wijze, Matthew H. Kramer & Ian Carter (eds.), Hillel Steiner and the Anatomy of Justice: Themes and Challenges. Routledge. pp. 16--259.
     
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  46.  2
    Spying Through a Glass Darkly: The Ethics of Espionage and Counter-Intelligence.Cécile Fabre - 2022 - Oxford University Press.
    Cécile Fabre draws back the curtain on the ethics of espionage and counterintelligence. In a book rich with historical examples she argues that spying is only justified to protect against ongoing violations of fundamental rights. Blackmail, bribery, mass surveillance, cyberespionage, treason, and other nefarious activities are considered.
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  47.  57
    Reply to Wilkinson.Cécile Fabre - 2008 - Res Publica 14 (2):137-140.
    In his review of my book Whose Body is It Anyway, Wilkinson criticises the view (which I defend) that confiscating live body parts for the sake of the needy is (under some circumstances) a requirement of justice. Wilkinson makes the following three points: (a) the confiscation thesis is problematic on its own terms; (b) there is a way to justify coercive resource transfers without being committed to it; (c) the thesis rests on a highly questionable approach to the status of (...)
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  48.  29
    Nigel Biggar’s Just War: Reflections on Jus Ad Bellum.Cécile Fabre - 2015 - Studies in Christian Ethics 28 (3):292-297.
    This paper raises some questions about Biggar’s accounts of the just cause and proportionality criteria for a just war. With respect to just cause, it argues that Biggar is committed to a broader range of justifications for war than one might think. Regarding proportionality, it claims that his account thereof invites reflection on the morality of conscription, and, more important still, given the book’s main aim—to refute Christian pacifism—in fact should lead him to embrace pacifism.
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  49.  20
    Review: Dworkin and His Critics, Justine Burley . Blackwell, 2004, Xiii + 412 Pp. [REVIEW]Cécile Fabre - 2006 - Economics and Philosophy 22 (2):288-289.
  50.  20
    An Introduction to Rights. [REVIEW]Cecile Fabre - 2006 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (1):108-109.
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