Results for 'Ceding, Get'

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  1.  13
    Getting a `Get' – the Limits of Law's Authority? N. V. N. (Jurisdiction: Pre-Nuptial Agreement) [1999] 2 F.L.R. 745. [REVIEW]Adrienne Barnett - 2000 - Feminist Legal Studies 8 (2):241-254.
    This note examines the decision of the Family Division of the High Court in N. v. N. (Jurisdiction: Pre-Nuptial Agreement) in which, in the context of Jewish divorce proceedings, the Court found that it had no jurisdiction to order a husband, by specific performance of a marriage agreement, to go through the procedure to obtain a ‘get’ (a hand-written bill of divorcement) allowing his wife to remarry. First, discussion of the case is contextualised broadly within the debate on the (de)merits (...)
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  2. How We Get Along.J. David Velleman - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    In How We Get Along, philosopher David Velleman compares our social interactions to the interactions among improvisational actors on stage. He argues that we play ourselves - not artificially but authentically, by doing what would make sense coming from us as we really are. And, like improvisational actors, we deal with one another in dual capacities: both as characters within the social drama and as players contributing to the shared performance. In this conception of social intercourse, Velleman finds rational grounds (...)
  3.  19
    A Capacity to Get Things Right: Gilbert Ryle on Knowledge.Michael Kremer - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):25-46.
    Gilbert Ryle's distinction between knowledge-how and knowledge-that faces a significant challenge: accounting for the unity of knowledge. Jason Stanley, an ‘intellectualist’ opponent of Ryle's, brings out this problem by arguing that Ryleans must treat ‘know’ as an ambiguous word and must distinguish knowledge proper from knowledge-how, which is ‘knowledge’ only so-called. I develop the challenge and show that underlying Ryle's distinction is a unified vision of knowledge as ‘a capacity to get things right’, covering both knowledge-how and knowledge-that. I show (...)
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  4.  15
    A Capacity to Get Things Right: Gilbert Ryle on Knowledge.Michael Kremer - 2016 - European Journal of Philosophy 24 (4).
    Gilbert Ryle's distinction between knowledge-how and knowledge-that faces a significant challenge: accounting for the unity of knowledge. Jason Stanley, an ‘intellectualist’ opponent of Ryle's, brings out this problem by arguing that Ryleans must treat ‘know’ as an ambiguous word and must distinguish knowledge proper from knowledge-how, which is ‘knowledge’ only so-called. I develop the challenge and show that underlying Ryle's distinction is a unified vision of knowledge as ‘a capacity to get things right’, covering both knowledge-how and knowledge-that. I show (...)
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  5. Do the Self-Deceived Get What They Want?Eric Funkhouser - 2005 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 86 (3):295-312.
    Two of the most basic questions regarding self-deception remain unsettled: What do self-deceivers want? What do self-deceivers get? I argue that self-deceivers are motivated by a desire to believe. However, in significant contrast with Alfred Mele’s account of self-deception, I argue that self-deceivers do not satisfy this desire. Instead, the end-state of self-deception is a false higher-order belief. This shows all self-deception to be a failure of self-knowledge.
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  6. Do CEOs Get Paid Too Much?Jeffrey Moriarty - 2005 - Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (2):257-281.
    In 2003, CEOs of the 365 largest U.S. corporations were paid on average $8 million, 301 times as much as factory workers. This paper asks whether CEOs get paid too much. Appealing to widely recognized moral values, I distinguish three views of justice in wages: the agreement view, the desert view, and the utility view. I argue that, no matter which view is correct, CEOs get paid too much. I conclude by offering two ways CEO pay might be reduced.
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  7. Speaking of Economics: How to Get in the Conversation.Arjo Klamer - 2007 - Routledge.
    Making sense of economists and their world in a persuasive and entertaining style, Arjo Klamer, the author of a number of influential books including _Conversation with Economists_ and _The Consequences of Economic Rhetoric_, shows that economics is as much about how people interact as it is about the models, the mathematics, the econometrics, the theories and the ideas that come from the enormous aggregate of economics literature. Knowing and understanding economics requires both bookwork and mingling with other economists. Viewing the (...)
     
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  8. Where Do You Get Your Protein? Or: Biochemical Realization.Tuomas E. Tahko - 2018 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
    Biochemical kinds such as proteins pose interesting problems for philosophers of science, as they can be studied from the points of view of both biology and chemistry. The relationship between the biological functions of biochemical kinds and the microstructures that they are related to is the key question. This leads us to a more general discussion about ontological reductionism, microstructuralism, and multiple realization at the biology-chemistry interface. On the face of it, biochemical kinds seem to pose a challenge for ontological (...)
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  9.  58
    How to Get It. Diagrammatic Reasoning as a Tool of Knowledge Development and its Pragmatic Dimension.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 2004 - Foundations of Science 9 (3):285-305.
    Discussions concerning belief revision, theorydevelopment, and ``creativity'' in philosophy andAI, reveal a growing interest in Peirce'sconcept of abduction. Peirce introducedabduction in an attempt to providetheoretical dignity and clarification to thedifficult problem of knowledge generation. Hewrote that ``An Abduction is Originary inrespect to being the only kind of argumentwhich starts a new idea'' (Peirce, CP 2.26).These discussions, however, led to considerabledebates about the precise way in which Peirce'sabduction can be used to explain knowledgegeneration (cf. Magnani, 1999; Hoffmann, 1999).The crucial question is (...)
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  10.  82
    Everything is Knowable – How to Get to Know Whether a Proposition is True.Hans van Ditmarsch, Wiebe van der Hoek & Petar Iliev - 2012 - Theoria 78 (2):93-114.
    Fitch showed that not every true proposition can be known in due time; in other words, that not every proposition is knowable. Moore showed that certain propositions cannot be consistently believed. A more recent dynamic phrasing of Moore-sentences is that not all propositions are known after their announcement, i.e., not every proposition is successful. Fitch's and Moore's results are related, as they equally apply to standard notions of knowledge and belief (S 5 and KD45, respectively). If we interpret ‘successful’ as (...)
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  11.  16
    Get Into Reading as an Intervention for Common Mental Health Problems: Exploring Catalysts for Change.C. Dowrick, J. Billington, J. Robinson, A. Hamer & C. Williams - 2012 - Medical Humanities 38 (1):15-20.
    There is increasing evidence for the efficacy of non-medical strategies to improve mental health and well-being. Get into Reading is a shared reading intervention which has demonstrable acceptability and feasibility. This paper explores potential catalysts for change resulting from Get into Reading. Two weekly reading groups ran for 12 months, in a GP surgery and a mental health drop-in centre, for people with a GP diagnosis of depression and a validated severity measure. Data collection included quantitative measures at the outset (...)
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  12.  7
    Female Access to Fertile Land and Other Inputs in Zambia: Why Women Get Lower Yields.William J. Burke, Serena Li & Dingiswayo Banda - 2018 - Agriculture and Human Values 35 (4):761-775.
    Throughout the developing world, it is a well-documented fact that women farmers tend to get lower yields than their male counterparts. Typically this is attributed to disproportionate access to high-quality inputs and labor, with some even arguing there could be a skills-gap stemming from unbalanced access to training and education. This article examines the gender-based yield gap in the context of Zambian maize producers. In addition to the usual drivers, we argue that Zambia’s patriarchal and multi-tiered land distribution system could (...)
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  13. How Do We Ever Get Up? On the Proximate Causation of Actions and Events.Geert Keil - 2001 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 61 (1):43-62.
    Many candidates have been tried out as proximate causes of actions: belief-desire pairs, volitions, motives, intentions, and other kinds of pro-attitudes. None of these mental states or events, however, seems to be able to do the trick, that is, to get things going. Each of them may occur without an appropriate action ensuing. After reviewing several attempts at closing the alleged “causal gap”, it is argued that on a correct analysis, there is no missing link waiting to be discovered. On (...)
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  14. Why You Don’T Want to Get in the Box with Schrödinger's Cat.David Papineau - 2003 - Analysis 63 (1):51–58.
    By way of an example, Lewis imagines your being invited to join Schrödinger’s cat in its box for an hour. This box will either fill up with deadly poison fumes or not, depending on whether or not some radioactive atom decays, the probability of decay within an hour being 50%. The invitation is accompanied with some further incentive to comply (Lewis sets it up so there is a significant chance of some pretty bad but not life-threatening punishment if you don’t (...)
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  15. How Do We Ever Get Up? On the Proximate Causation of Actions and Events.Grazer Philosophise he Studien - 2001 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 61 (1):43.
    Many candidates have been tried out as proximate causes of actions: belief-desire pairs, volitions, motives, intentions, and other kinds of pro-attitudes. None of these mental states or events, however, seems to be able to do the trick, that is, to get things going. Each of them may occur without an appropriate action ensuing. After reviewing several attempts at closing the alleged “causal gap”, it is argued that on a correct analysis, there is no missing link waiting to be discovered. On (...)
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  16.  25
    The Role of Business Schools in Managing the Incongruence Between Doing What is Right and Doing What It Takes to Get Ahead.Robert H. Schwartz, Sami Kassem & Dean Ludwig - 1991 - Journal of Business Ethics 10 (6):465 - 469.
    This paper accepts as given that business students want to get ahead. It criticizes business schools for their failure to reduce the incongruence between doing what is right and doing what it takes to get ahead. Because of this failure business school graduates carry negative ideas, attitudes and behaviors vis-à-vis social responsibility from business schools into the business world. Recommendations are made for increasing the social responsibility of business schools.
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  17.  68
    Who Needs Stories If You Can Get the Data? ISPs in the Era of Big Number Crunching.Mireille Hildebrandt - 2011 - Philosophy and Technology 24 (4):371-390.
    Who Needs Stories if You Can Get the Data? ISPs in the Era of Big Number Crunching Content Type Journal Article Category Special Issue Pages 371-390 DOI 10.1007/s13347-011-0041-8 Authors Mireille Hildebrandt, Institute of Computer and Information Sciences (ICIS), Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, the Netherlands Journal Philosophy & Technology Online ISSN 2210-5441 Print ISSN 2210-5433 Journal Volume Volume 24 Journal Issue Volume 24, Number 4.
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  18.  37
    How Can We Get Students to Think Critically About Intransigent Beliefs?Tracy Bowell & Justine Kingsbury - 2017 - Teaching Philosophy 40 (4):395-405.
    Part of the job of the philosophy teacher, and in particular the critical thinking teacher, is to encourage students to critically examine their own beliefs. There are some beliefs that are difficult to think critically about, even for those who have critical thinking skills and are committed to applying them to their own beliefs. These resistant beliefs are not all of a kind, and so a range of different strategies may be needed to get students to think critically about them. (...)
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  19.  24
    Why Can't We All Just Get Along? A Comment on Turner's Plea to Social Scientists and Bioethicists.Raymond de Vries - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (1):43.
    Okay, Professor Turner is not Rodney King. He is not responding to bioethicists and social scientists running amuck, setting automobiles aflame, and pelting each other with rocks and broken bottles. He does not come right out and ask, “Why can't we all just get along?” But in its academic way, Turner's essay is an effort to negotiate a truce in the interdisciplinary squabbles that plague bioethics, a plea to move bioethics beyond the “misleading” and “unhelpful” “demarcation of disciplinary goals” that (...)
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  20.  23
    What Exactly is the Scientific Method and Why Do so Many People Get It Wrong?Peter Ellerton - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 125:14.
    Ellerton, Peter So what is the scientific method, and why do so many people, sometimes including those trained in science, get it so wrong? The first thing to understand is that there is no one method in science, no one way of doing things. This is intimately connected with how we reason in general.
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  21.  26
    'Do You Get Some Funny Looks When You Tell People What You Do?' Muddling Through Some Angsts and Ethics of (Being a Male) Researching with Children.John Horton - 2001 - Ethics, Place and Environment 4 (2):159 – 166.
    This paper is an attempt - and a plea - to get real about the ethics of practising social science 'with children rather than on or for children'. It is written from and in response to a troubling question: why (when I am 'police cleared' and my research is 'ethical' in terms of legality, professional codes of practice and notions of.
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  22.  18
    Single Payers and Multiple Lists: Must Everyone Get the Same Coverage in a Universal Health Plan?Robert M. Veatch - 1997 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 7 (2):153-169.
    : In spite of recent political setbacks for the movement toward universal health insurance, considerable support remains for the idea. Among those supporting such plans, most assume that a universal insurance system, especially if it is a single-payer system, would offer a single list of basic covered services. This paper challenges that assumption and argues for the availability of multiple lists of services in a universal insurance system. The claim is made that multiple lists will be both more efficient and (...)
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  23.  20
    'Do You Get Some Funny Looks When You Tell People What You Do?' Muddling Through Some Angsts and Ethics of Researching with Children.John Horton - 2001 - Ethics, Place and Environment 4 (2):159-166.
    This paper is an attempt - and a plea - to get real about the ethics of practising social science 'with children rather than on or for children'. It is written from and in response to a troubling question: why (when I am 'police cleared' and my research is 'ethical' in terms of legality, professional codes of practice and notions of.
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  24. You Do an Empirical Experiment and You Get an Empirical Result. What Can Any Anthropologist Tell Me That Could Change That?Charles Whitehead - 2008 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (10-11):7-41.
    Do you think the quotation in my title is reasonable or unreasonable? I find it unreasonable, but I know that many will not. Two people can react to the same idea, opinion, or data in opposite ways, and the reasons for this are often ideological. Ideology always has a political origin — in this case perhaps reflecting turf wars, career promotion, self-legitimation, the privileged status of science in post-industrial societies, and the need to say the right things in order to (...)
     
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  25.  28
    The Semantic and Syntactic Decomposition of Get: An Interaction Between Verb Meaning and Particle Placement.Andrew McIntyre - 2005 - Journal of Semantics 22 (4):401-438.
    VPs with get and a PP/particle provide an argument for lexical decomposition in syntax. Get (and German kriegen) has a ‘hindrance’ reading, which does not denote causative events and resembles manage in that the result is portrayed as hard to achieve, and in that possibility operators do not affect the meaning under negation: I didn't (=couldn't) get the key in. These effects surprisingly follow from an analysis where hindrance-get VPs are nothing more than inchoatives of have-VPs of the type have (...)
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  26.  30
    Using Language to Get Outside Language.John Post - manuscript
    They say it can't be done . You can't use language to get outside language . The very idea . Thus Putnam : "our language cannot be divided up into two parts, a part that describes the world `as it is anyway,' and a part that describes our conceptual contribution," in order..
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  27.  7
    “If I Get Deported Back to Iraq…I Will Be Dead”.Amir Rashid - unknown
    for income tax evasion, but it cannot be defended for pursuing otherwise innocent people. The man responsible for bringing these four cases, Roanoke U.S. Attorney John Brownlee, has defended his actions (Rocktown Weekly, April 27-May 3, 2006, p. 11): “We have to properly track money going overseas so it’s not going to the wrong places.” But, this could be done without this law. Even though 12 agencies investigated these money transfers, led by the FBI, none charged that any went to (...)
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  28.  10
    “If I Get Deported Back to Iraq…I Will Be Dead”.Barkley Rosser - unknown
    Nobody has died yet as a result of the ongoing trials for transferring money internationally without a license of four Harrisonburg men from Kurdish parts of Iraq: Rashid Qambari, Ahmed Abdullah, Amir Rashid, and Fadhil Noroly. However, before coming here they were threatened because of their work for groups associated with the United States, and they were brought here by the United States government as part of Operation Pacific Haven. Saddam Hussein killed members of local Kurdish families. Qambari, convicted on (...)
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  29.  31
    How to Get Philosophy Students Talking: An Instructor's Toolkit.Andrew Fisher & Jonathan Tallant - 2015 - Routledge.
    Engaging undergraduate students and instigating debate within philosophy seminars is one of the greatest challenges faced by instructors on a daily basis. _How to Get Philosophy Students Talking: An Instructor’s Toolkit _is an innovative and original resource designed for use by academics looking to help students of all abilities get the most out of their time spent in group discussions. Each chapter features thought experiments, discussion questions and further readings on topics within the following core areas of philosophy: Metaphysics Epistemology (...)
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  30. Oh, Wait-Now I Get It: Essays in Popular Philosophy.Peter Heinegg - 2007 - Hamilton Books.
    Like war and politics, philosophy is too important to be left to professionals. Oh Wait_Now I Get It illustrates this basic truth by tackling a broad spectrum of issues, which include: history, religion, government, sex, family, and death. In fact, the entire contemporary cultural scene from the perspective of a thoughtful amateur philosopher is brought forth within this book. Recalling Neitzsche's dictum that all philosophy is also confession, Professor Peter Heinegg begins with some autobiographical pieces on his background, which include (...)
     
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  31. You Can’t Get There from Here: Reflections on the Beijing Consensus.David Schweickart - 2006 - In Yu Keping (ed.), China Model and the Beijing Consensus. Beijing, China: pp. 72-98.
    You Can’t Get There from Here: Reflections on the Beijing Consensus.
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  32.  7
    Is It Still Cheating If I Don't Get Caught?Bruce D. Weinstein - 2009 - Roaring Brook Press.
    The Basics. Life is like whac-a-mole -- Ethics : the art of doing the right thing -- The five principles ; Bringing the principles to life. "BFF!" Part 1 : Trash talk, promises, and cookies that, um, don't taste so good -- Winning on and off the field -- Meetups, hookups, and breakups -- Self-defense : bullies, pushers, and critics -- Getting tangled in the World Wide Web -- "Gotcha!" : spoiling, cheating, and taking advantage of another's mistake -- "BFF!" (...)
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  33.  8
    Get 'Em All! Kill 'Em!: Genocide, Terrorism, Righteous Communities.Bruce Wilshire - 2004 - Lexington Books.
    Why do groups become genocidal and try to incapacitate all members of an alien group, even sometimes killing fetuses? Prematurely alluding to evil or to the Devil blocks the possibility for further inquiry. Get 'Em All! Kill 'Em! is the first systematic attempt to explain what, up until now, has seemed to be inexplicable phenomena.
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  34. Get 'Em All! Kill 'Em!: Genocide, Terrorism, Righteous Communities.Bruce Wilshire - 2004 - Lexington Books.
    Why do groups become genocidal and try to incapacitate all members of an alien group, even sometimes killing fetuses? Prematurely alluding to evil or to the Devil blocks the possibility for further inquiry. Get 'Em All! Kill 'Em! is the first systematic attempt to explain what, up until now, has seemed to be inexplicable phenomena.
     
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  35. Who Should Get In? The Ethics of Immigration Admissions.Joseph H. Carens - 2003 - Ethics and International Affairs 17 (1):95-110.
    This article explores normative questions about what legal rights settled immigrants should have in liberal democratic states. It argues that liberal democratic justice, properly understood, greatly constrains the distinctions that can be made between citizens and residents.
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  36.  14
    Using Bayes to Get the Most Out of Non-Significant Results.Zoltan Dienes - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  37.  10
    Going From Evidence to Recommendations: Can GRADE Get Us There?Mathew Mercuri, Brian Baigrie & Ross E. G. Upshur - 2018 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 24 (5):1232-1239.
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  38. A Posteriori Physicalists Get Our Phenomenal Concepts Wrong.Philip Goff - 2011 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (2):191 - 209.
    Dualists say plausible things about our mental concepts: there is a way of thinking of pain, in terms of how it feels, which is independent of causal role. Physicalists make attractive ontological claims: the world is wholly physical. The attraction of a posteriori physicalism is that it has seemed to do both: to agree with the dualist about our mental concepts, whilst retaining a physicalist ontology. In this paper I argue that, in fact, a posteriori physicalism departs from the dualist's (...)
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  39. Do a Posteriori Physicalists Get Our Phenomenal Concepts Wrong?E. Diaz‐Leon - 2014 - Ratio 27 (1):1-16.
    A posteriori physicalism is the combination of two appealing views: physicalism (i.e. the view that all facts are either physical or entailed by the physical), and conceptual dualism (i.e. the view that phenomenal truths are not entailed a priori by physical truths). Recently, some philosophers such as Goff (2011), Levine (2007) and Nida-Rümelin (2007), among others, have suggested that a posteriori physicalism cannot explain how phenomenal concepts can reveal the nature of phenomenal properties. In this paper, I wish to defend (...)
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  40. Why We Get Sick the New Science of Darwinian Medicine.Randolph M. Nesse & George C. Williams - 1994
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  41. Measuring Complexity: Things That Go Wrong and How to Get It Right.Vincent Vesterby - 2008 - Emergence: Complexity and Organization 10 (2):90-102.
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  42.  21
    If You Want to Get Ahead, Get a Theory.Annette Karmiloff-Smith & Bärbel Inhelder - 1974 - Cognition 3 (3):195-212.
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  43.  5
    It's How You Get There: Walking Down a Virtual Alley Activates Premotor and Parietal Areas.Johanna Wagner, Teodoro Solis-Escalante, Reinhold Scherer, Christa Neuper & Gernot Müller-Putz - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  44. You Can’T Always Get What You Want: Some Considerations Regarding Conditional Probabilities.Wayne C. Myrvold - 2015 - Erkenntnis 80 (3):573-603.
    The standard treatment of conditional probability leaves conditional probability undefined when the conditioning proposition has zero probability. Nonetheless, some find the option of extending the scope of conditional probability to include zero-probability conditions attractive or even compelling. This article reviews some of the pitfalls associated with this move, and concludes that, for the most part, probabilities conditional on zero-probability propositions are more trouble than they are worth.
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  45. Siegel’s Get Rich Quick Scheme.Jesse Prinz - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 163 (3):827-835.
  46.  54
    Do Ethical Leaders Get Ahead? Exploring Ethical Leadership and Promotability.Michael E. Brown - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (2):215-236.
    Despite sustained attention to ethical leadership in organizations, scholarship remains largely descriptive. This study employs an empirical approach to examine the consequences of ethical leadership on leader promotability. From a sample of ninety-six managers from two independent organizations, we found that ethical leaders were increasingly likely to be rated by their superior as exhibiting potential to reach senior leadership positions. However, leaders who displayed increased ethical leadership were no more likely to be viewed as promotable in the near-term compared to (...)
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  47.  20
    Nothing Personal: What Psychologists Get Wrong About Identity.Christina Starmans & Paul Bloom - 2018 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 22 (7):566-568.
  48.  67
    Why 'Ought' Detaches: Or, Why You Ought to Get with My Friends (If You Want to Be My Lover).Alex Silk - 2014 - Philosophers' Imprint 14.
    This paper argues that a standard analysis of modals from formal semantics suggests a solution to the detaching problem — the problem of whether un-embedded 'ought'-claims can "detach" (be derived) from hypothetical imperatives and their antecedent conditions. On a broadly Kratzerian analysis, modals have a skeletal conventional meaning and receive a particular reading (e.g., deontic, epistemic, teleological) only relative to certain forms of contextual supplementation. I argue that 'ought'-claims can detach — subject to an important qualification — but only as (...)
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  49. Kant’s Derivation of the Formula of the Categorical Imperative: How to Get It Right.Jacqueline Mariña - 1998 - Kant-Studien 89 (2):167-178.
    This paper explores the charge by Bruce Aune and Allen Wood that a gap exists in Kant's derivation of the Categorical Imperative. I show that properly understood, no such gap exists, and that the deduction of the Categorical Imperative is successful as it stands.
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  50.  19
    Why Does Board Gender Diversity Matter and How Do We Get There? The Role of Shareholder Activism in Deinstitutionalizing Old Boys’ Networks.Elise Perrault - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (1):149-165.
    This essay bridges together social network and institutional perspectives to examine how women on boards, by breaking up directors’ homophilous networks, contribute to board effectiveness. It proposes that through real and symbolic representations, women enhance perceptions of the board’s instrumental, relational, and moral legitimacy, leading to increased perceptions of the board’s trustworthiness which in turn fosters shareholders’ trust in the firm. Envisioning the gender diversification of boards as an event of institutional change, this article considers the critical role of shareholder (...)
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