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  1.  23
    Descartes on Seeing: Epistemology and Visual Perception.Celia Wolf-Devine - 1993 - Southern Illinois University.
    In this first book-length examination of the Cartesian theory of visual perception, Celia Wolf-Devine explores the many philosophical implications of Descartes’ theory, concluding that he ultimately failed to provide a completely mechanistic theory of visual perception. Wolf-Devine traces the development of Descartes’ thought about visual perception against the backdrop of the transition from Aristotelianism to the new mechanistic science—the major scientific paradigm shift taking place in the seventeenth century. She considers the philosopher’s work in terms of its background in Aristotelian (...)
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  2. Abortion: Three Perspectives.Michael Tooley, Celia Wolf-Devine, Philip E. Devine & Alison M. Jaggar - 2009 - Oup Usa.
    The newest addition to the Point/Counterpoint Series, Abortion: Three Perspectives features a debate between four noted philosophers - Michael Tooley, Celia Wolf-Devine, Philip E. Devine, and Alison M. Jaggar - presenting different perspectives on one of the most socially and politically argued issues of the past 30 years. The three main arguments include the "liberal" pro-choice approach, the "communitarian" pro-life approach, and the "gender justice" approach. Divided into two parts, the text features the authors' ideas, developed in depth, and their (...)
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  3.  44
    An Inequity in Affirmative Action.Celia Wolf-Devine - 1988 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 5 (1):107-108.
  4.  43
    Sex and Gender: A Spectrum of Views.Philip E. Devine & Celia Wolf-Devine - 2003 - Wadsworth Publishing.
    SEX AND GENDER: A SPECTRUM OF VIEWS provides a medium for discussion and debate about today's most provocative issues concerning human sexuality and the relationships between masculinity and femininity. Including a spectrum of views that ranges from the stridently conservative to the progressively feminist, this anthology engages students in these subjects using a wider range of standpoints than is typical of such readers.
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  5.  34
    Letters to the Editor.J. B. Schneewind, Paul Humphreys, Leonard Katz, Celia Wolf-Devine, George Graham, Daniel P. Anderson, Mary Ellen Waithe, Tibor R. Machan & Jonathan E. Adler - 1996 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 69 (5):141 - 150.
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  6.  30
    Letters to the Editor.W. F. Vallicella, Virginia Held, John Davenport, John J. Stuhr, John McCumber, Celia Wolf-Devine, Albert Cinelli, Henry Simoni-Wastila, Eugene Kelly & Brian Leiter - 1997 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 71 (2):107 - 122.
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  7.  88
    Countering the ‘Nothing But’ Argument.Celia Wolf-Devine - 2005 - Faith and Philosophy 22 (4):482-495.
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  8.  5
    Countering the ‘Nothing But’ Argument.Celia Wolf-Devine - 2005 - Faith and Philosophy 22 (4):482-495.
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  9.  6
    Diversity and Community in the Academy: Affirmative Action in Faculty Appointments.Celia Wolf-Devine - 1997 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In the wake of court rulings that have forced university administrators to reevaluate affirmative action policies, this balanced, thoughtful book examines three typical defenses of those policies: that affirmative action compensates for past discrimination; that it provides role models and ensures diversity; and that it corrects for systemic bias against women and racial minorities.
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  10.  17
    Moral Boundaries: A Political Argument for an Ethic of Care.Celia Wolf-Devine - 1995 - International Philosophical Quarterly 35 (1):115-117.
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  11.  16
    Sutton, John. Philosophy and Memory Traces: Descartes to Connectionism.Celia Wolf-Devine - 2000 - Review of Metaphysics 54 (2):459-461.
  12.  8
    Welcoming the Unborn: Toward a Politics of Inclusion.Celia Wolf-Devine - 2018 - In David Boonin, Katrina L. Sifferd, Tyler K. Fagan, Valerie Gray Hardcastle, Michael Huemer, Daniel Wodak, Derk Pereboom, Stephen J. Morse, Sarah Tyson, Mark Zelcer, Garrett VanPelt, Devin Casey, Philip E. Devine, David K. Chan, Maarten Boudry, Christopher Freiman, Hrishikesh Joshi, Shelley Wilcox, Jason Brennan, Eric Wiland, Ryan Muldoon, Mark Alfano, Philip Robichaud, Kevin Timpe, David Livingstone Smith, Francis J. Beckwith, Dan Hooley, Russell Blackford, John Corvino, Corey McCall, Dan Demetriou, Ajume Wingo, Michael Shermer, Ole Martin Moen, Aksel Braanen Sterri, Teresa Blankmeyer Burke, Jeppe von Platz, John Thrasher, Mary Hawkesworth, William MacAskill, Daniel Halliday, Janine O’Flynn, Yoaav Isaacs, Jason Iuliano, Claire Pickard, Arvin M. Gouw, Tina Rulli, Justin Caouette, Allen Habib, Brian D. Earp, Andrew Vierra, Subrena E. Smith, Danielle M. Wenner, Lisa Diependaele, Sigrid Sterckx, G. Owen Schaefer, Markus K. Labude, Harisan Unais Nasir, Udo Schuklenk, Benjamin Zolf & Woolwine (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of Philosophy and Public Policy. Springer Verlag. pp. 677-689.
    I here present a feminine voice version of the moral case against abortion and draw from it some conclusions for public policy. My motto is solidarity with the last and least. The unborn individual is “one of us”—to be welcomed, not dismissed as a burden on society. Abortion, I argue, is bad for women, bad for children, and bad for the rest of us. Public policy should reflect these conclusions.
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  13.  24
    Descartes' Philosophy Interpreted According to the Order of Reasons. [REVIEW]Celia Wolf-Devine - 1986 - Review of Metaphysics 40 (2):380-382.
    This work by one of the foremost French Cartesian scholars, first published in the 1950's, is now at last available in English. In it Gueroult applies a method which he calls "analysis of structures" to the Meditations, treating the first five meditations in Volume I and the Sixth Meditation in Volume II. This method attempts to grasp the essentials of Descartes' metaphysics by obeying his directive to attend above all to the sequence and linkage of reasons. Since the Meditations follow (...)
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  14.  9
    Moral Boundaries: A Political Argument for an Ethic of Care. [REVIEW]Celia Wolf-Devine - 1995 - International Philosophical Quarterly 35 (1):115-117.
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  15.  19
    Sutton, John. Philosophy and Memory Traces: Descartes to Connectionism. [REVIEW]Celia Wolf-Devine - 2000 - Review of Metaphysics 54 (2):459-461.
    This book will be valuable predominantly to specialists who are already familiar with the literature on the subject. It bristles with scholarly references, and includes a 43 page bibliography. Sutton’s approach is an interdisciplinary one, drawing on cognitive science, medicine, and neurophysiology as well as literature, psychology, and philosophy. The purpose of the book is to describe and defend a set of theories of autobiographical memory, both historical and contemporary, which view memories as dynamic patterns rather than static archives, fragmentary (...)
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  16.  20
    The Concept of Woman. [REVIEW]Celia Wolf-Devine - 1999 - Review of Metaphysics 52 (4):925-926.
  17.  14
    The Concept of Woman. [REVIEW]Celia Wolf-Devine - 1999 - Review of Metaphysics 52 (4):925-926.
    This book is the fruit of an enormous amount of impassioned and careful historical research into the way in which Western philosophers have thought about the concept of woman and her relationship to man. To me the most refreshing thing about it is the absence of the sort of rancor and partisanship that one frequently finds in works on this subject. Allen tries to present a fair and balanced account of all the people she treats, and includes numerous quotations from (...)
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  18.  17
    The Suspicion of Virtue. [REVIEW]Celia Wolf-Devine - 2004 - International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (3):448-450.
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