Results for 'Changing Coalitions'

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  1. Ikuo Kabashima Faculty of Law, Tokyo University, E-Mail: Kabashima@ Ju-Tokyo. Ac. Jp Steven R. Reed Faculty of Policy Studies, Chuo University, E-Mail: SReed@ Fps. Chuo-U. Ac. Jp. [REVIEW]Changing Coalitions - 2000 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 1 (2):229-248.
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  2.  15
    Voter Reactions to 'Strange Bedfellows': The Japanese Voter Faces a Kaleidoscope of Changing Coalitions.Ikuo Kabashima & Steven R. Reed - 2000 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 1 (2):229-248.
    On 30 June 1994 the Social Democratic Party of Japan (SDPJ, formerly the Japan Socialist Party) joined its historic enemy, the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), to form a coalition government in a Japanese equivalent of Italy's . Competition between the conservative LDP and the progressive socialists had defined the Japanese party system since 1955. In this paper we analyze voter reactions to this and other confusing events surrounding the end of the LDP's 38-year dominance. We find, first, that the Japanese (...)
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  3.  34
    Coalition Governments, Party Switching, and the Rise and Decline of Parties: Changing Japanese Party Politics Since 1993.Junko Kato & Yuto Kannon - 2008 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 9 (3):341-365.
    Since 1993, coalition governments have replaced the 38-year-long, one-party dominance of the Liberal Democratic Party (the LDP) in Japan. Except for one year, from 1993 to 1994, the LDP has remained a key party in successive governing coalitions, but the dynamics of party competition has been completely transformed since the period of the LDP's dominance. Although the LDP has survived to form a variety of coalitions ranging from a minority to an over-sized majority, since 1998 the Democratic Party (...)
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  4. Identity Categories as Potential Coalitions.Anna Carastathis - 2013 - Signs 38 (4):941-965.
    Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw ends her landmark essay “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence against Women of Color” with a normative claim about coalitions. She suggests that we should reconceptualize identity groups as “in fact coalitions,” or at least as “potential coalitions waiting to be formed.” In this essay, I explore this largely overlooked claim by combining philosophical analysis with archival research I conducted at the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Historical Society Archive in San Francisco (...)
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  5.  27
    Hormonal Mechanisms for Regulation of Aggression in Human Coalitions.Mark V. Flinn, Davide Ponzi & Michael P. Muehlenbein - 2012 - Human Nature 23 (1):68-88.
    Coalitions and alliances are core aspects of human behavior. All societies recognize alliances among communities, usually based in part on kinship and marriage. Aggression between groups is ubiquitous, often deadly, fueled by revenge, and can have devastating effects on general human welfare. Given its significance, it is surprising how little we know about the neurobiological and hormonal mechanisms that underpin human coalitionary behavior. Here we first briefly review a model of human coalitionary behavior based on a process of runaway (...)
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  6. On the Puzzle of the Changing Past.Andrea Iacona - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (1):137-142.
    In the intriguing article The puzzle of the changing past, Barlassina and Del Prete argue that, if one grants a platitude about truth and accepts a simple story that they tell, one is forced to conclude that the past has changed. I will suggest that there is a coherent way to resist that conclusion. The platitude about truth is in fact a platitude, but the story is not exactly as they tell it.
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  7.  4
    Arrow's Decisive Coalitions.Wesley H. Holliday & Eric Pacuit - forthcoming - Social Choice and Welfare.
    In his classic monograph, Social Choice and Individual Values, Arrow introduced the notion of a decisive coalition of voters as part of his mathematical framework for social choice theory. The subsequent literature on Arrow’s Impossibility Theorem has shown the importance for social choice theory of reasoning about coalitions of voters with different grades of decisiveness. The goal of this paper is a fine-grained analysis of reasoning about decisive coalitions, formalizing how the concept of a decisive coalition gives rise (...)
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  8. Are 'Coalitions of the Willing' Moral Agents?Stephanie Collins - 2014 - Ethics and International Affairs 28 (1):online only.
    In this reply to an article of Toni Erskine's, I argue that coalitions of the willing are moral agents. They can therefore bear responsibility in their own right.
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  9.  44
    Local Food Policy Coalitions: Evaluation Issues as Seen by Academics, Project Organizers, and Funders. [REVIEW]Karen L. Webb, David Pelletier, Audrey N. Maretzki & Jennifer Wilkins - 1998 - Agriculture and Human Values 15 (1):65-75.
    Several different evaluation issuesare perceived as important by people involved withinnovative projects intended to improve local food andnutrition systems; particularly the establishment oflocal food policy coalitions. Several such coalitionshave been formed in North America, Europe, andAustralia with the goal of improving community foodsecurity and promoting sustainable local food systems.Pioneer coalitions have served as models, yet therehas been little systematic evaluation of thesemodels. A qualitative study was conducted to identifyfactors that may hinder evaluation efforts. In grouptelephone interviews, we sought (...)
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  10.  65
    An Alternative Model of the Formation of Political Coalitions.Jan-Willem Van Der Rijt - 2008 - Theory and Decision 64 (1):81-101.
    Most models of the formation of political coalitions use either Euclidean spaces or rely purely on game theory. This limits their applicability. In this article, a single model is presented which is more broadly applicable. In principle any kind of set can be used as a policy space. The model is also able to incorporate different kinds of party motivations: both rent-seeking and idealism. The model uses party preferences and power to identify stable coalitions and predict government policy (...)
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  11.  58
    Effectivity Functions and Efficient Coalitions in Boolean Games.Elise Bonzon, Marie-Christine Lagasquie-Schiex & Jérôme Lang - 2012 - Synthese 187 (S1):73-103.
    Boolean games are a logical setting for representing strategic games in a succinct way, taking advantage of the expressive power and conciseness of propositional logic. A Boolean game consists of a set of players, each of which controls a set of propositional variables and has a specific goal expressed by a propositional formula. We show here that Boolean games are a very simple setting, yet sophisticated enough, for analysing the formation of coalitions. Due to the fact that players have (...)
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  12.  8
    Changing Doctors' Behaviours: An Educational Program to Disseminate a New Clinical Pathway for the Hospital Management of Hip Fractures in Elderly Patients in the Lazio Region, Italy.Alma Ciaschi, Andrea Caprara, Francesca Gillespie, Giacomo Furnari & Sílvia Mamede - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (4):811-818.
  13.  12
    Manipulating the Attractiveness of a Gamble Without Changing its Expected Value.Paul Slovic - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 79 (1p1):139.
  14.  13
    Retrieval of Repeated Items Embedded in Changing Lists.Herman Buschke, Walter Ritter & Marion Gindes - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (4):726.
  15.  10
    Keeping Track of Changing Variables: Effects of Rehearsal Training and Rehearsal Prevention in Normal and Retarded Adolescents.Ann L. Brown, Joseph C. Campione, Norman W. Bray & Barbara L. Wilcox - 1973 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 101 (1):123.
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  16.  4
    An Experimental Analysis of Set in Rote Learning: Retroactive Inhibition as a Function of Changing Set.William O. Jenkins & Leo Postman - 1949 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (1):69.
  17.  80
    Changing Order: Replication and Induction in Scientific Practice.H. M. Collins - 1985 - University of Chicago Press.
    This fascinating study in the sociology of science explores the way scientists conduct, and draw conclusions from, their experiments. The book is organized around three case studies: replication of the TEA-laser, detecting gravitational rotation, and some experiments in the paranormal. "In his superb book, Collins shows why the quest for certainty is disappointed. He shows that standards of replication are, of course, social, and that there is consequently no outside standard, no Archimedean point beyond society from which we can lever (...)
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  18.  25
    Changing the Conversation About Brain Death.Robert D. Truog & Franklin G. Miller - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (8):9-14.
    We seek to change the conversation about brain death by highlighting the distinction between brain death as a biological concept versus brain death as a legal status. The fact that brain death does not cohere with any biologically plausible definition of death has been known for decades. Nevertheless, this fact has not threatened the acceptance of brain death as a legal status that permits individuals to be treated as if they are dead. The similarities between “legally dead” and “legally blind” (...)
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  19.  52
    The Fixation of Belief and its Undoing: Changing Beliefs Through Inquiry.Isaac Levi - 1991 - Cambridge University Press.
    Isaac Levi's new book is concerned with how one can justify changing one's beliefs. The discussion is deeply informed by the belief-doubt model advocated by C. S. Peirce and John Dewey, of which the book provides a substantial analysis. Professor Levi then addresses the conceptual framework of potential changes available to an inquirer. A structural approach to propositional attitudes is proposed, which rejects the conventional view that a propositional attitude involves a relation between an agent and either a linguistic (...)
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  20.  91
    Avoiding or Changing the Past?G. C. Goddu - 2011 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 92 (1):11-17.
    Some philosophers argue that any attempt to model changing the past will either be contradictory or really model avoiding the past. Using Nicholas Smith's (1997) argument as a basis, I formulate a generic version of this Avoidance Argument. I argue that the Avoidance Argument fails because (i) it involves an equivocation of what is meant by ‘bifurcation of the time of an event’ and (ii) resolving the equivocation results in the falsity of at least one of the premises. Hence, (...)
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  21. Will the Global Crisis Lead to Global Transformations? 2. The Coming Epoch of New Coalitions.Leonid Grinin & Andrey Korotayev - 2010 - Journal of Globalization Studies 1 (2):166-183.
    This article presents possible answers, and their respective probabilities, to the question, ‘What are the consequences of the present global crisis in the proximate future of the World System?’ It also attempts to describe the basic characteristics of the forthcoming ‘Epoch of New Coalitions’ and to forecast certain future conditions. Among the problems analyzed in this paper are the following: What does the weakening of the economic role of the USA as the World System centre mean? Will there be (...)
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  22.  14
    Changing Funding Arrangements and the Production of Scientific Knowledge: Introduction to the Special Issue.Jochen Gläser & Kathia Serrano Velarde - 2018 - Minerva 56 (1):1-10.
    With this special issue, we would like to promote research on changes in the funding of the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Since funding secures the livelihood of researchers and the means to do research, it is an indispensable condition for almost all research; as funding arrangements are undergoing dramatic changes, we think it timely to renew the science studies community’s efforts to understand the funding of research. Changes in the governance of science have garnered considerable attention from science studies (...)
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  23.  26
    The Changing Role of Business in Global Society.Ingo Pies - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (3):375-401.
    This article introduces an “ordonomic” approach to corporate citizenship. We believe that ordonomics offers a conceptual framework for analyzing both the social structure and the semantics of moral commitments. We claim that such an analysis can provide theoretical guidance for the changing role of business in society, especially in regard to the expectation and trend that businesses take a political role and act as corporate citizens. The systematic raison d’être of corporate citizenship is that business firms can and—judged by (...)
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  24. The Changing Role of Governments in Corporate Social Responsibility: Drivers and Responses.Laura Albareda, Josep M. Lozano, Antonio Tencati, Atle Midttun & Francesco Perrini - 2008 - Business Ethics 17 (4):347-363.
    The aim of this article is to contribute to understanding the changing role of government in promoting corporate social responsibility (CSR). Over the last decade, governments have joined other stakeholders in assuming a relevant role as drivers of CSR, working together with intergovernmental organizations and recognizing that public policies are key in encouraging a greater sense of CSR. This paper focuses on the analysis of the new strategies adopted by governments in order to promote, and encourage businesses to adopt, (...)
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  25. Time Travel and Changing the Past: (Or How to Kill Yourself and Live to Tell the Tale).G. C. Goddu - 2003 - Ratio 16 (1):16–32.
    According to the prevailing sentiment, changing the past is logically impossible. The prevailing sentiment is wrong. In this paper, I argue that the claim that changing the past entails a contradiction ultimately rests upon an empirical assumption, and so the conclusion that changing the past is logically impossible is to be resisted. I then present and discuss a model of time which drops the empirical assumption and coherently models changing the past. Finally, I defend the model, (...)
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  26.  42
    The Revenge of Ecological Rationality: Strategy-Selection by Meta-Induction Within Changing Environments.Gerhard Schurz & Paul D. Thorn - 2016 - Minds and Machines 26 (1-2):31-59.
    According to the paradigm of adaptive rationality, successful inference and prediction methods tend to be local and frugal. As a complement to work within this paradigm, we investigate the problem of selecting an optimal combination of prediction methods from a given toolbox of such local methods, in the context of changing environments. These selection methods are called meta-inductive strategies, if they are based on the success-records of the toolbox-methods. No absolutely optimal MI strategy exists—a fact that we call the (...)
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  27.  14
    The Side Effects of Deemed Consent: Changing Defaults in Organ Donation.David M. Shaw - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (7):435-439.
    In this Current Controversy article, I describe and analyse the imminent move to a system of deemed consent for deceased organ donation in England and similar planned changes in Scotland, in light of evidence from Wales, where the system changed in 2015. Although the media has tended to focus on the potential benefits and ethical issues relating to the main change from an opt-in default to an opt-out one, other defaults will also change, while some will remain the same. Interaction (...)
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  28. The Changing Character of Civil Wars, 1800–2009.Stathis N. Kalyvas - 2011 - In Hew Strachan & Sibylle Scheipers (eds.), The Changing Character of War. Oxford University Press. pp. 202--219.
  29. Richness of Indian Symbolism and Changing Perspectives.Balaganapathi Devarakonda - 2009 - In Paata Chkheidze, Hoang Thi To & Yaroslav Pasko (eds.), Symbols in Cultures and Identities in a Time of Global Interaction.
    My aim in this paper is to explicate the diversity of Indian Symbolism and to show the changing patterns of symbols. The first part is mostly descriptive and interpretative and tries to bring out the different forms of Indian Symbolism. The second part tries to bring out the different kinds of changes that are possible with regard to symbols.
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  30. Changing an Organization's Culture Under New Leadership.Ronald R. Sims - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 25 (1):65 - 78.
    Turning around and changing an organization's culture does not happen by chance. The purpose of this paper is to offer insights into what is needed for an organization to successfully transform itself from a culture and experience that does not support individual ethical behavior. The recent bond trading scandal at Salomon Brothers will be used to demonstrate that a successful ethical turnaround does not just happen spontaneously. In particular, we argue that new leadership, altering policies, structure, behavior, and beliefs (...)
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  31. Changing the Criminal Character: Nanotechnology and Criminal Punishment.Katrina Sifferd - 2012 - In A. Santosuosso (ed.), Proceedings of the 2011 Law and Science Young Scholars Symposium. Pavia University Press.
    This chapter examines how advances in nanotechnology might impact criminal sentencing. While many scholars have considered the ethical implications of emerging technologies, such as nanotechnology, few have considered their potential impact on crucial institutions such as our criminal justice system. Specifically, I will discuss the implications of two types of technological advances for criminal sentencing: advanced tracking devices enabled by nanotechnology, and nano-neuroscience, including neural implants. The key justifications for criminal punishment- including incapacitation, deterrence, rehabilitation, and retribution – apply very (...)
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  32.  48
    The Coming Epoch of New Coalitions: Possible Scenarios of the Near Future.Leonid Grinin & Andrey Korotayev - 2011 - World Futures 67 (8):531 - 563.
    This article analyzes some important aspects of socioeconomic and political development of the world in the near future. The future always stems from the present. The first part of the article is devoted to the study of some crucial events of the present, which could be regarded as precursors of forthcoming fundamental changes. In particular, it is shown that the turbulent events of late 2010 and 2011 in the Arab World may well be regarded as a start of the global (...)
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  33.  34
    Descartes's Changing Mind.Peter K. Machamer - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    This is the first book to focus on Descartes's changing views, and it is welcome."--Roger Ariew, University of South Florida.
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  34.  73
    Changing One's Mind: Self‐Conscious Belief and Rational Endorsement.Adam Leite - 2018 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 97 (1):150-171.
    Self-consciously attempting to shape one's beliefs through deliberation and reasoning requires that one stand in a relation to those beliefs that might be signaled by saying that one must inhabit one's beliefs as one's own view. What does this amount to? A broad swath of philosophical thinking about self-knowledge, norms of belief, self-consciousness, and related areas assumes that this relation requires one to endorse, or be rationally committed to endorsing, one's beliefs. In fact, however, fully self-conscious adherence to epistemic norms (...)
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  35. On the Origin of the Typological/Population Distinction in Ernst Mayr's Changing Views of Species, 1942-1959.Carl Chung - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (2):277-296.
    Ernst Mayr's typological/population distinction is a conceptual thread that runs throughout much of his work in systematics, evolutionary biology, and the history and philosophy of biology. Mayr himself claims that typological thinking originated in the philosophy of Plato and that population thinking was first introduced by Charles Darwin and field naturalists. A more proximate origin of the typological/population thinking, however, is found in Mayr's own work on species. This paper traces the antecedents of the typological/population distinction by detailing Mayr's (...) views of species between 1942 and 1955. During this period, Mayr struggles to refine the biological species concept in the face of tensions that exist between studying species locally and studying them as geographically distributed collections of variable populations. The typological/population distinction is first formulated in 1955, when Mayr generalizes from the type concept versus the population concept in taxonomy to typological versus population thinking in biology more generally. Mayr's appeal to the more general distinction between typological and population thinking coincides with the waning status of natural history and evolutionary biology that occurs in the early 1950s and the distinction plays an important role in Mayr's efforts to legitimate the natural historical sciences. (shrink)
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  36. Changing the Subject: Psychology, Social Regulation and Subjectivity.Julian Henriques, Wendy Hollway, Cathy Urwin, Couze Venn & Valerie Walkerdine - 1998 - Routledge.
    _Changing the Subject_ is a classic critique of traditional psychology in which the foundations of critical and feminist psychology are laid down. Pioneering and foundational, it is still _the _groundbreaking text crucial to furthering the new psychology in both teaching and research. Now reissued with a new foreword describing the changes which have taken place over the last few years, _Changing the Subject _will continue to have a significant impact on thinking about psychology and social theory.
     
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  37. Social Capital, Social Inclusion and Changing School Contexts: A Scottish Perspective.James McGonigal, Robert Doherty, Julie Allan, Sarah Mills, Ralph Catts, Morag Redford, Andy McDonald, Jane Mott & Christine Buckley - 2007 - British Journal of Educational Studies 55 (1):77-94.
    This paper synthesises a collaborative review of social capital theory, with particular regard for its relevance to the changing educational landscape within Scotland. The review considers the common and distinctive elements of social capital, developed by the founding fathers-Putnam, Bourdieu and Coleman-and explores how these might help to understand the changing contexts and pursue opportunities for growth.
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  38. Changing the Rules: Architecture and the New Millennium.David Kirsh - 2001 - Convergence 7 (2):113-125.
    Architecture is about to enter its first magical phase: a time when buildings actively co-operate with their inhabitants; when objects know what they are, where they are, what is near them; when social and physical space lose their type coupling; when wall and partitions change with mood and task. As engineers and scientists explore how to digitse the world around us, the classical constraints of design, ruled so long by the physics of space, time, and materials, are starting to crumble. (...)
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  39.  23
    Multiple Realities: The Changing Life Worlds of Actors.Charlotte L. Doyle - 2016 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 47 (2):107-133.
    This is an empirical phenomenological interview study into the experiences of professional actors as they create and perform roles for the stage. Prior research was inadequate for capturing actors’ changing life worlds over time. Analyzing the interviews using the descriptive phenomenological method yielded general structural descriptions and pointed to the relevance of Schütz’s description of multiple realities. Being cast in a role changes the pace and goals of actors’ everyday worlds and leads the actors intermittently and with intention to (...)
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  40. Theorising Web 3.0: ICTs in a Changing Society.David Kreps & Kai Kimppa - 2015 - Information Technology and People 28 (4):726-741.
    Abstract: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyse the broad phases of web development: the read-only Web 1.0, the read-write Web 2.0, and the collaborative and Internet of Things Web 3.0, are examined for the theoretical lenses through which they have been understood and critiqued. Design/methodology/approach – This is a conceptual piece, in the tradition of drawing on theorising from outside the Information Systems field, to shed light on developments in information communication technologies (ICTs). Findings – Along (...)
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  41.  36
    Executive Pay and Legitimacy: Changing Discursive Battles Over the Morality of Excessive Manager Compensation. [REVIEW]Maria Joutsenvirta - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (3):459-477.
    How is the (il)legitimacy of manager compensation constructed in social interaction? This study investigated discursive processes through which heavily contested executive pay schemes of the Finnish energy giant Fortum were constructed as (il)legitimate in public during 2005–2009. The critical discursive analysis of media texts identified five legitimation strategies through which politicians, journalists, and other social actors contested these schemes and, at the same time, constructed subject positions for managers, politicians, and citizens. The comparison of two debate periods surrounding the 2007–2008 (...)
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  42.  3
    The Evolution of Shared Concepts in Changing Populations.Jungkyu Park, Sean Tauber, Kimberly A. Jameson & Louis Narens - 2019 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 10 (3):479-498.
    The evolution of color categorization systems is investigated by simulating categorization games played by a population of artificial agents. The constraints placed on individual agent’s perception and cognition are minimal and involve limited color discriminability and learning through reinforcement. The main dynamic mechanism for population evolution is pragmatic in nature: There is a pragmatic need for communication between agents, and if the results of such communications have positive consequences in their shared world then the agents involved are positively rewarded, whereas (...)
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  43. Defending the Criminal Law: Reflections on the Changing Character of Crime, Procedure, and Sanctions.Andrew Ashworth & Lucia Zedner - 2008 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 2 (1):21-51.
    Recent years have seen mounting challenge to the model of the criminal trial on the grounds it is not cost-effective, not preventive, not necessary, not appropriate, or not effective. These challenges have led to changes in the scope of the criminal law, in criminal procedure, and in the nature and use of criminal trials. These changes include greater use of diversion, of fixed penalties, of summary trials, of hybrid civil–criminal processes, of strict liability, of incentives to plead guilty, and of (...)
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  44. Learning in a Changing Environment.David R. Shanks - unknown
    Multiple cue probability learning studies have typically focused on stationary environments. We present three experiments investigating learning in changing environments. A fine-grained analysis of the learning dynamics shows that participants were responsive to both abrupt and gradual changes in cue-outcome relations. We found no evidence that participants adapted to these types of change in qualitatively different ways. Also, in contrast to earlier claims that these tasks are learned implicitly, participants showed good insight into what they learned. By fitting formal (...)
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  45.  14
    Mbas' Changing Attitudes Toward Marketing Dilemmas: 1981–1987. [REVIEW]George M. Zinkhan, Michael Bisesi & Mary Jane Saxton - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (12):963 - 974.
    This study investigates the reactions of 561 MBA students to ethical marketing dilemmas. An analysis is conducted across time to determine how MBA students' attitudes about ethical marketing issues have been changing over the course of the 1980s. The findings show some support for the notion that MBA students in the late 1980s are somewhat less likely to use moral idealism when resolving an ethical dilemma and more likely to justify the decision in terms of its outcomes as compared (...)
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  46.  7
    Equivalent Theories and Changing Hamiltonian Observables in General Relativity.J. Brian Pitts - 2018 - Foundations of Physics 48 (5):579-590.
    Change and local spatial variation are missing in Hamiltonian general relativity according to the most common definition of observables as having 0 Poisson bracket with all first-class constraints. But other definitions of observables have been proposed. In pursuit of Hamiltonian–Lagrangian equivalence, Pons, Salisbury and Sundermeyer use the Anderson–Bergmann–Castellani gauge generator G, a tuned sum of first-class constraints. Kuchař waived the 0 Poisson bracket condition for the Hamiltonian constraint to achieve changing observables. A systematic combination of the two reforms might (...)
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  47. Extending, Changing, and Explaining the Brain.Mazviita Chirimuuta - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (4):613-638.
    This paper addresses concerns raised recently by Datteri (Biol Philos 24:301–324, 2009) and Craver (Philos Sci 77(5):840–851, 2010) about the use of brain-extending prosthetics in experimental neuroscience. Since the operation of the implant induces plastic changes in neural circuits, it is reasonable to worry that operational knowledge of the hybrid system will not be an accurate basis for generalisation when modelling the unextended brain. I argue, however, that Datteri’s no-plasticity constraint unwittingly rules out numerous experimental paradigms in behavioural and systems (...)
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  48.  12
    How Research on Microbiomes is Changing Biology: A Discussion on the Concept of the Organism.Adrian Stencel & Agnieszka M. Proszewska - 2018 - Foundations of Science 23 (4):603-620.
    Multicellular organisms contain numerous symbiotic microorganisms, collectively called microbiomes. Recently, microbiomic research has shown that these microorganisms are responsible for the proper functioning of many of the systems of multicellular organisms. This has inclined some scholars to argue that it is about time to reconceptualise the organism and to develop a concept that would place the greatest emphasis on the vital role of microorganisms in the life of plants and animals. We believe that, unfortunately, there is a problem with this (...)
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  49.  12
    Readiness of Ethics Review Systems for a Changing Public Health Landscape in the WHO African Region.Marion Motari, Martin Okechukwu Ota & Joses Muthuri Kirigia - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-9.
    BackgroundThe increasing emphasis on research, development and innovation for health in providing solutions to the high burden of diseases in the African Region has warranted a proliferation of studies including clinical trials. This changing public health landscape requires that countries develop adequate ethics review capacities to protect and minimize risks to study participants. Therefore, this study assessed the readiness of national ethics committees to respond to challenges posed by a globalized biomedical research system which is constantly challenged by new (...)
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  50.  19
    ‘Transforming’ Self and World: A Phenomenological Study of a Changing Lifeworld Following a Cochlear Implant. [REVIEW]Linda Finlay & Patricia Molano-Fisher - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (3):255-267.
    After 50 years of being profoundly deaf, Patricia finds her world ‘transformed’—literally and metaphorically—when she receives a cochlear implant. Her sense of self and the taken-for-granted, comfortable world she knew before surgery disappear and she is thrown into an alien, surreal existence full of hyper-noise. Entry into this new world of sounds proves a mixed blessing as Pat struggles to come to terms with her changing relationships, not only with others but also with herself. On good days, she is (...)
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