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  1.  32
    Lineage, Sex, and Wealth as Moderators of Kin Investment.Gregory D. Webster, Angela Bryan, Charles B. Crawford, Lisa McCarthy & Brandy H. Cohen - 2008 - Human Nature 19 (2):189-210.
    Supporting Hamilton’s inclusive fitness theory, archival analyses of inheritance patterns in wills have revealed that people invest more of their estates in kin of closer genetic relatedness. Recent classroom experiments have shown that this genetic relatedness effect is stronger for relatives of direct lineage (children, grandchildren) than for relatives of collateral lineage (siblings, nieces, nephews). In the present research, multilevel modeling of more than 1,000 British Columbian wills revealed a positive effect of genetic relatedness on proportions of estates allocated to (...)
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  2.  6
    Modeling Costs and Benefits of Adolescent Weight Control as a Mechanism for Reproductive Suppression.Judith L. Anderson & Charles B. Crawford - 1992 - Human Nature 3 (4):299-334.
    The “reproductive suppression hypothesis” states that the strong desire of adolescent girls in our culture to control their weight may reflect the operation of an adaptive mechanism by which ancestral women controlled the timing of their sexual maturation and hence first reproduction, in response to cues about the probable success of reproduction in the current situation. We develop a model based on this hypothesis and explore its behavior and evolutionary and psychological implications across a range of parameter values. We use (...)
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  3.  12
    Trivers-Willard Rules for Sex Allocation.Judith L. Anderson & Charles B. Crawford - 1993 - Human Nature 4 (2):137-174.
    We present a quantitative model of sex allocation to investigate whether the simple “rules of thumb” suggested by Trivers and Willard (1973) would really maximize numbers of grandchildren in human populations. Using demographic data from the !Kung of southern Africa and the basic assumptions of the Trivers-Willard hypothesis, we calculate expected numbers of grandchildren based on age- and sex-specific reproductive value. Patterns of parental investment that would maximize numbers of expected grandchildren often differ from the Trivers-Willard rules. In particular, the (...)
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  4.  11
    Stigmatizing Women's Aggressive Behavior: Who Does It Benefit and Why?Marc A. Johnston & Charles B. Crawford - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):226-227.
    Why is female violence a taboo? We suggest that both men and women actively contribute to the creation of this stigma. Men may benefit because nonaggressive women may make better mothers and be more faithful and fertile. Females may benefit by downplaying their aggressive nature because they will be perceived as more valuable mates and because they will be more accepted within female social groups.
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