14 found
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Charles Hermes [8]Charles M. Hermes [6]
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Charles Hermes
University of Texas at Arlington
  1. Truthmakers and the Direct Argument.Charles Hermes - 2013 - Philosophical Studies (2):401-418.
    The truthmaker literature has recently come to the consensus that the logic of truthmaking is distinct from classical propositional logic. This development has huge implications for the free will literature. Since free will and moral responsibility are primarily ontological concerns (and not semantic concerns) the logic of truthmaking ought to be central to the free will debate. I shall demonstrate that counterexamples to transfer principles employed in the direct argument occur precisely where a plausible logic of truthmaking diverges from classical (...)
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  2.  54
    A Counterexample to A.Charles Hermes - 2014 - Philosophia 42 (2):387-389.
    The Direct Argument is an important argument for demonstrating that moral responsibility is incompatible with determinism because it makes no presuppositions about the nature of free will. One of the inference rules employed in the Direct Argument is rule A: If a proposition is broadly logically necessary, then it is true and no one is, nor ever has been, even partially morally responsible for the fact that the proposition is true. While inference rule A is assumed by all parties to (...)
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  3.  91
    More Trouble for Direct Source Incompatibilism: Reply to Yang. [REVIEW]Charles Hermes & Joe Campbell - 2012 - Acta Analytica 27 (3):335-344.
    Direct source incompatibilism (DSI) is the conjunction of two claims: SI-F: there are genuine Frankfurt-style counterexamples (FSCs); SI-D: there is a sound version of the direct argument (DA). Eric Yang ( 2012 ) responds to a recent criticism of DSI (Campbell 2006 ). We show that Yang misses the mark. One can accept Yang’s criticisms and get the same result: there is a deep tension between FSCs and DA, between SI-F and SI-D. Thus, DSI is untenable. In this essay, we (...)
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  4.  76
    Functions and Altered States in Dispositional Analysis: A Reply to Vihvelin.Charles Hermes - 2012 - Philosophical Studies (1):1-7.
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  5.  49
    Two Concepts of Nomic Accessibility.Charles M. Hermes - 2004 - Southwest Philosophy Review 20 (2):87-94.
    Almost everyone agrees, under some interpretation, that a world is nomologically accessible if and only if it obeys the laws of the base world. This surface agreement, however, has led many to attach little importance to different interpretations, thereby conflating two distinct concepts of nomological accessibility. According to the Shared Law Account (hereafter SL), a target world is nomologically accessible from the base world if, and only if, all and only the laws of the base world are laws at the (...)
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  6.  11
    Functions and Altered States in Dispositinal Analysis: A Reply to Vihvelin.Charles Hermes - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 169 (1):97-103.
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  7. Scientific Essentialism and the Lewis/Ramsey Account of Laws of Nature.Charles M. Hermes - unknown
    Humean interpretations claim that laws of nature merely summarize events. Non-Humean interpretations claim that laws force events to occur in certain patterns. First, I show that the Lewis/Ramsey account of lawhood, which claims that laws are axioms or theorems of the simplest strongest summary of events, provides the best Humean interpretation of laws. The strongest non-Humean account, the scientific essentialist position, grounds laws of nature in essential non-reducible dispositional properties held by natural kinds. The scientific essentialist account entails that laws (...)
     
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  8. Truthmakers and the Consequence Argument.Charles Hermes - manuscript
    Recent work in the truthmakers literature demonstrates that the logic of truthmaking is distinct from classical logic. Since free will is an ontological issue, and not merely a semantic issue, arguments about free will ought to be sensitive to these developments. In Truthmakers and the Direct Argument, Hermes argues that one of the main arguments for incompatibiilsm fails precisely where the truthmakers literature would predict. Here, I argue that similar problems make the Consequence Argument untenable.
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  9.  82
    Does Attempting to Try to A Imply Trying to A?Charles Hermes - 2006 - Southwest Philosophy Review 22 (2):63-70.
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  10.  55
    The Overdetermination Argument Against Eliminativism.Charles M. Hermes - 2006 - Southwest Philosophy Review 22 (1):113-119.
  11. Cognitive Peers and Self-Deception.Charles M. Hermes - 2007 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 26 (3):123-130.
     
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  12.  23
    Forms of Thought: A Study in Philosophical Logic. [REVIEW]Charles Hermes - 2014 - Philosophical Quarterly 64 (255):352-354.
  13.  7
    The Overdetermination Argument Against Eliminativism.Charles M. Hermes - 2006 - Southwest Philosophy Review 22 (1):113-119.
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  14.  5
    Two Concepts of Nomlc Accessibility.Charles M. Hermes - 2004 - Southwest Philosophy Review 20 (2):87-94.
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