12 found
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Charles A. Heywood [11]Charles Heywood [1]
  1.  37
    Spatial Attention Speeds Discrimination Without Awareness in Blindsight.Robert W. Kentridge, Charles A. Heywood & Lawrence Weiskrantz - 2004 - Neuropsychologia 42 (6):831-835.
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  2.  73
    Attention Without Awareness in Blindsight.Robert W. Kentridge, Charles A. Heywood & Lawrence Weiskrantz - 1999 - Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 266:1805-11.
  3.  19
    Exogenous Attention to Unseen Objects?Liam J. Norman, Charles A. Heywood & Robert W. Kentridge - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 35:319-329.
  4.  29
    Cortical Color Blindness is Not ''Blindsight for Color''.Charles A. Heywood, Robert W. Kentridge & Alan Cowey - 1998 - Consciousness and Cognition 7 (3):410-423.
    Cortical color blindness, or cerebral achromatopsia, has been likened by some authors to ''blindsight'' for color or an instance of ''covert'' processing of color. Recently, it has been shown that, although such patients are unable to identify or discriminate hue differences, they nevertheless show a striking ability to process wavelength differences, which can result in preserved sensitivity to chromatic contrast and motion in equiluminant displays. Moreover, visually evoked cortical potentials can still be elicited in response to chromatic stimuli. We suggest (...)
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  5. Attention and Alerting: Cognitive Processes Spared in Blindsight.Robert W. Kentridge & Charles A. Heywood - 2001 - In Beatrice De Gelder, Edward H. F. De Haan & Charles A. Heywood (eds.), Out of Mind: Varieties of Unconscious Processes. Oxford University Press. pp. 163-181.
  6.  21
    Chromatic Discrimination in a Cortically Colour-Blind Observer.Charles A. Heywood, Alan Cowey & F. Newcombe - 1991 - European Journal of Neuroscience 3:802-12.
  7.  37
    The Status of Blindsight: Near-Threshold Vision, Islands of Cortex and the Riddoch Phenomenon.Robert W. Kentridge & Charles A. Heywood - 1999 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (5):3-11.
    In this introductory paper, we assess the current status of blindsight -- the phenomenon in which patients with damage to their primary visual cortex retain the ability to detect, discriminate and localize visual stimuli presented in areas of their visual field in which they report that they are subjectively blind. Blindsight has garnered a great deal of interest and critical research, in part because of its important implications for the philosophy of mind. We briefly consider why this is so, and (...)
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  8.  75
    Metacognition and Awareness.Robert W. Kentridge & Charles A. Heywood - 2000 - Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):308-312.
    It is tempting to assume that metacognitive processes necessarily evoke awareness. We review a number of experiments in which cognitive schema have been shown to develop without awareness. Implicit learning of a novel schema may not involve metacognitive regulation per se. Substitution of one automatic process by another as a result of the inadequacy of the former as circumstances change does, however, clearly involve metacognitive and executive processes of error correction and schema selection. We describe a recently published study in (...)
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  9. Out of Mind: Varieties of Unconscious Processes.Beatrice de Gelder, Edward de Haan & Charles Heywood (eds.) - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    Can we learn without consciousness? When the eminent neuropsychologist, Lawrence Weiskrantz first coined the term 'blindsight' to describe a condition whereby a patient could demonstrate that they were aware of some object, yet insist that they were completely unaware of its existence, the response from some in the scientific community was one of extreme skepticism. Even now, there are those who question the existence of unconscious learning, and the topic remains one of the most actively researched and debated in psychology. (...)
     
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  10. Colour and the Cortex: Wavelength Processing in Cortical Achromatopsia.Charles A. Heywood, Robert W. Kentridge & Alan Cowey - 2001 - In Beatrice De Gelder, Edward H. F. De Haan & Charles A. Heywood (eds.), Out of Mind: Varieties of Unconscious Processes. Oxford University Press. pp. 52-68.
  11.  61
    Affective Blindsight?Charles A. Heywood & Robert W. Kentridge - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (4):125-126.
  12.  31
    Cerebral Achromatopsia: Colour Blindness Despite Wavelength Processing.Alan Cowey & Charles A. Heywood - 1997 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (4):133-139.