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Charles W. Kalish [12]Charles Kalish [6]
  1.  13
    The Role of Covariation Versus Mechanism Information in Causal Attribution.Woo-Kyoung Ahn, Charles W. Kalish, Douglas L. Medin & Susan A. Gelman - 1995 - Cognition 54 (3):299-352.
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  2.  34
    Why Essences Are Essential in the Psychology of Concepts.Woo-Kyoung Ahn, Charles Kalish, Susan A. Gelman, Douglas L. Medin, Christian Luhmann, Scott Atran, John D. Coley & Patrick Shafto - 2001 - Cognition 82 (1):59-69.
  3.  2
    Temporal Dynamics of Categorization: Forgetting as the Basis of Abstraction and Generalization.Haley A. Vlach & Charles W. Kalish - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  4.  9
    Causal Status Effect in Children's Categorization.Woo-Kyoung Ahn, Susan A. Gelman, Jennifer A. Amsterlaw, Jill Hohenstein & Charles W. Kalish - 2000 - Cognition 76 (2):B35-B43.
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  5.  24
    Can Semi-Supervised Learning Explain Incorrect Beliefs About Categories?Charles W. Kalish, Timothy T. Rogers, Jonathan Lang & Xiaojin Zhu - 2011 - Cognition 120 (1):106-118.
    Three experiments with 88 college-aged participants explored how unlabeled experiences—learning episodes in which people encounter objects without information about their category membership—influence beliefs about category structure. Participants performed a simple one-dimensional categorization task in a brief supervised learning phase, then made a large number of unsupervised categorization decisions about new items. In all three experiments, the unsupervised experience altered participants’ implicit and explicit mental category boundaries, their explicit beliefs about the most representative members of each category, and even their memory (...)
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  6.  30
    Becoming Status Conscious.Charles Kalish - 2005 - Philosophical Explorations 8 (3):245 – 263.
    This paper explores the cognitive developments underlying conventionalized social phenomena such as language and ownership. What do children make of the claims that, 'This is mine' or 'That is called "water"?' Understanding these features of social reality involves appreciating status as a system of normative prescriptions. Research on children's theories of intentional agency suggests important constraints on the development of status systems. Key insights are that prescriptions affect behavior only via representations, and that the norms involved in prescriptions are distinct (...)
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  7.  1
    Leave Her Out of It: Person‐Presentation of Strategies is Harmful for Transfer.Anne E. Riggs, Martha W. Alibali & Charles W. Kalish - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (8):1965-1978.
    A common practice in textbooks is to introduce concepts or strategies in association with specific people. This practice aligns with research suggesting that using “real-world” contexts in textbooks increases students’ motivation and engagement. However, other research suggests this practice may interfere with transfer by distracting students or leading them to tie new knowledge too closely to the original learning context. The current study investigates the effects on learning and transfer of connecting mathematics strategies to specific people. A total of 180 (...)
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  8. Semi-Supervised Learning is Observed in a Speeded but Not an Unspeeded 2D Categorization Task.Timothy T. Rogers, Charles Kalish, Bryan R. Gibson, Joseph Harrison & Xiaojin Zhu - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
  9.  4
    Property Content Guides Children’s Memory for Social Learning Episodes.Anne E. Riggs, Charles W. Kalish & Martha W. Alibali - 2014 - Cognition 131 (2):243-253.
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  10.  87
    Negative Evidence and Inductive Generalisation.Charles W. Kalish & Christopher A. Lawson - 2007 - Thinking and Reasoning 13 (4):394-425.
    How do people use past experience to generalise to novel cases? This paper reports four experiments exploring the significance on one class of past experiences: encounters with negative or contrasting cases. In trying to decide whether all ravens are black, what is the effect of learning about a non-raven that is not black? Two experiments with preschool-aged, young school-aged, and adult participants revealed that providing a negative example in addition to a positive example supports generalisation. Two additional experiments went on (...)
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  11.  14
    How Children Use Examples to Make Conditional Predictions.Charles W. Kalish - 2010 - Cognition 116 (1):1-14.
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  12.  7
    The Role of Maltreatment Experience in Children's Understanding of the Antecedents of Emotion.Susan B. Perlman, Charles W. Kalish & Seth D. Pollak - 2008 - Cognition and Emotion 22 (4):651-670.
  13.  19
    Gold, Jade, and Emeruby: The Value of Naturalness for Theories of Concepts and Categories.Charles Kalish - 2002 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 22 (1):45-66.
    Researchers studying the psychology of concepts frequently draw distinctions between artificial and natural concepts. Unfortunately, there is a lack of consensus regarding the foundations and implications of the distinction. This paper provides a review and evaluation of the different ways researchers have approached the question of conceptual naturalness. Accounts may be divided into 2 approaches described as psychologically or externally based. These characterizations motivate distinctive sets of research questions. In addition to the particular implications, the author also considers the general (...)
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  14.  7
    The Rocky Road From Acts to Dispositions: Insights for Attribution Theory From Developmental Research on Theories of Mind.Andrea D. Rosati, Eric D. Knowles, Charles W. Kalish, Alison Gopnik, Daniel R. Ames & Michael W. Morris - 2001 - In Bertram Malle, L. J. Moses & Dare Baldwin (eds.), Intentions and Intentionality: Foundations of Social Cognition. MIT Press.
  15.  41
    How Young Children Learn From Examples: Descriptive and Inferential Problems.Charles W. Kalish, Sunae Kim & Andrew G. Young - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (8):1427-1448.
    Three experiments with preschool- and young school-aged children (N = 75 and 53) explored the kinds of relations children detect in samples of instances (descriptive problem) and how they generalize those relations to new instances (inferential problem). Each experiment initially presented a perfect biconditional relation between two features (e.g., all and only frogs are blue). Additional examples undermined one of the component conditional relations (not all frogs are blue) but supported another (only frogs are blue). Preschool-aged children did not distinguish (...)
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  16.  12
    The Social Folk Theorist: Insights From Social and Cultural Psychology on The.Daniel R. Ames, Eric D. Knowles, Michael W. Morris, Charles W. Kalish, Andrea D. Rosati & Alison Gopnik - 2001 - In Bertram Malle, L. J. Moses & Dare Baldwin (eds.), Intentions and Intentionality: Foundations of Social Cognition. MIT Press.
  17. Integrating Normative and Psychological Knowledge.Charles Kalish - manuscript
    Human beings live in an incredibly complex social environment. Understanding the cognitive abilities that produce and sustain this environment is among the central goals of psychological research. Given the scope of the phenomena involved it is inevitable that research has become organized into subfields that explore different aspects of social cognition. As necessary as such a division of research labor might be, it is also necessary to keep in mind the bigger questions and think about how the pieces of the (...)
     
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