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  1.  29
    Conflicting Varieties of Realism: Causal Powers and the Problems of Social Structure.Charles R. Varela & Rom Harré - 1996 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 26 (3):313-325.
    Proponents of the view that social structures are ontologically distinct from the people in whose actions they are immanent have assumed that structures can stand in causal relations to individual practices. Were causality to be no more than Humean concomitance correlations between structure and practices would be unproblematic. But two prominent advocates of the ontological account of structures, Bhaskar and Giddens, have also espoused a powers theory of causality. According to that theory causation is brought about by the activity of (...)
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  2.  28
    Science for Humanism: The Recovery of Human Agency.Charles R. Varela - 2009 - Routledge.
    In the 18th century, the pre-modern Judeo-Greco-Christian problem of freedom and determinism is transformed by Kant into the modern problem of the freedom of human agency in the natural and cultural worlds of deterministic structures; it is this version of the freedom and determinism issue which centres the Science and Humanism debates, and thus marks the history of the social sciences. Anthony Giddens is credited with providing the new vocabulary of ‘structure’ and ‘agency’ in order to formulate the problem of (...)
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  3.  25
    Biological Structure and Embodied Human Agency: The Problem of Instinctivism.Charles R. Varela - 2003 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 33 (1):95–122.
    Hebb's conception of instinctive behavior permits the conclusion that it is just not human nature to be instinctive: while the ant brain is built for instinctive behavior, the human brain is built for intelligent behavior. Since drives cannot be instincts, even when a human driver becomes driven, human motives are not instincts either. This understanding allows us to dismiss the determinism of the old instinctivism found in Freud's bio-psychological unconscious, and of the new instinctivism, exemplified by Wilson's sociobiology. The latter (...)
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  4.  25
    The Second Somatic Revolution1.Brenda Farnell & Charles R. Varela - 2008 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 38 (3):215-240.
    This paper proposes a dynamic theory of embodiment that aims to get beyond the absent moving body in embodied social theory. The first somatic revolution, inspired by Merleau Ponty, provided theories based on the feeling and experience of the body. The theory of dynamic embodiment focuses instead on the doing itself as embodied social action, in which the embodied person is fore-grounded as a complex resource for meaning making. This represents a theoretical enrichment of the earlier turn to the body (...)
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  5.  9
    The Impossibility of Which Naturalism? A Response and a Reply.Charles R. Varela - 2002 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 32 (1):105–111.
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  6.  19
    Ethogenic Theory and Psychoanalysis: The Unconscious as a Social Construction and a Failed Explanatory Concept.Charles R. Varela - 1995 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 25 (4):363–385.
  7.  40
    Harré and Merleau-Ponty: Beyond the Absent Moving Body in Embodied Social Theory.Charles R. Varela - 1994 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 24 (2):167–185.
  8.  24
    The Romantic Realism of Michel Foucault Returning to Kant.Charles R. Varela - 2013 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 43 (2):226-245.
    Beatrice Han argues that the theories of subjection (determinism: structure) and subjectivation (freedom: agency) are the “the blind spot of Foucault's work:” to the very end of his life, in being transcendental and historical theories, respectively, they were in irresolvable conflict. In part I, I have argued that Foucault encourages us to situate the theories of the subject in an un-thematized reach for a metaphysics of realism which, in effect, was to ground his uncertain complementary reach for a naturalist conduct (...)
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  9.  16
    The Romantic Realism of Michel Foucault The Scientific Temptation.Charles R. Varela - 2013 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 43 (1):1-22.
    Beatrice Han has argued that the theories of subjection (determinism: structure) and subjectivation (freedom: agency) are the “the blind spot[s] of Foucault's work.” Furthermore, she continues, as historical and transcendental theories, respectively, Foucault left them in a state of irresolvable conflict. In the Scientific Temptation I have shown that, as a practicing researcher, Foucault encourages us to situate the theories of the subject in the context of his un-thematized search for a metaphysics of realism, the purpose of which was to (...)
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