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  1.  55
    Highway Bridges and Feasts: Heidegger and Borgmann on How to Affirm Technology. [REVIEW]Hubert L. Dreyus & Charles Spinosa - 1997 - Man and World 30 (2):159-178.
    Borgmann's views seem to clarify and elaborate Heidegger's. Both thinkers understand technology as a way of coping with people and things that reveals them, viz. makes them intelligible. Both thinkers also claim that technological coping could devastate not only our environment and communal ties but more importantly the historical, world-opening being that has defined Westerners since the Greeks. Both think that this devastation can be prevented by attending to the practices for coping with simple things like family meals and footbridges. (...)
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  2. Coping with Things-in-Themselves: A Practice-Based Phenomenological Argument for Realism.Hubert L. Dreyfus & Charles Spinosa - 1999 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 42 (1):49-78.
    Against Davidsonian (or deflationary) realism, it is argued that it is coherent to believe that science can in principle give us access to the functional components of the universe as they are in themselves in distinction from how they appear to us on the basis of our quotidian concerns or sensory capacities. The first section presents the deflationary realist's argument against independence. The second section then shows that, although Heidegger pioneered the deflationary realist account of the everyday, he sought to (...)
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  3.  52
    Disclosing New Worlds: Entrepreneurship, Democratic Action, and the Cultivation of Solidarity.Charles Spinosa, Fernando Flores & Hubert Dreyfus - 1995 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 38 (1 & 2):3 – 63.
    Both the commonsensical and leading theoretical accounts of entrepreneurship, democracy, and solidarity fail to describe adequately entrepreneurial, democratic, and solidarity?building practices. These accounts are inadequate because they assume a faulty description of human being. In this article we develop an interpretation of entrepreneurship, democratic action, and solidarity?building that relies on understanding human beings as neither primarily thinking nor desiring but as skillful beings. Western human beings are at their best when they are engaged in producing large?scale cultural or historical changes (...)
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  4.  7
    Two Kinds of Antiessentialism and Their Consequences.Charles Spinosa & Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1996 - Critical Inquiry 22 (4):735-763.
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  5.  51
    Robust Intelligibility: Response to Our Critics.Charles Spinosa & Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1999 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 42 (2):177-194.
    Robust realism is defended by developing further the account in Inquiry 42 (1999), pp. 49-78 of how human beings make things and people intelligible. Incommensurate worlds imply a violation of the principle of noncontradiction, but this violation does not have the consequences normally feared. Given our capacities to make things intelligible, some things, like human action, are most intelligible when they are understood as contradictory (e.g. free and determined). Things-in-themselves need not have contradictory features for multiple orders of nature to (...)
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  6.  38
    Skills, Historical Disclosing, and the End of History: A Response to Our Critics.Charles Spinosa, Fernando Flores & Hubert Dreyfus - 1995 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 38 (1 & 2):157 – 197.
    We appreciate the thoughtful responses we have received on ?Disclosing New Worlds?. We will respond to the concerns raised by grouping them under three general themes. First, a number of questions arise from lack of clarity about how the matters we undertook to discuss ? especially solidarity ? appear when one starts by thinking about the primacy of skills and practices. Under this heading we consider (a) whether we need more case studies to make our points, and (b) whether national (...)
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  7.  10
    And Now for Something Completely Different: From Heidegger to EntrepreneurshipDisclosing New Worlds: Entrepreneurship, Democratic Action, and the Cultivation of Solidarity.Robert C. Solomon, Charles Spinosa, Fernando Flores & Hubert Dreyfus - 1999 - Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (1):169.
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  8.  13
    Shylock and Debt and Contract in "The Merchant of Venice".Charles Spinosa - 1993 - Cardozo Studies in Law and Literature 5 (1):65-85.
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  9.  3
    Single-World Versus Plural-World Antiessentialism: A Reply to Tim Dean.Charles Spinosa & Hubert L. Dreyfus - 1997 - Critical Inquiry 23 (4):921-932.
  10.  1
    Zwei Arten des Antiessentialismus und ihre Konsequenzen.Hubert Dreyfus & Charles Spinosa - 1997 - Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 45 (1):23-50.
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